Student Affairs Report

Criterion Two: Preparing for the Future

 

Admissions

  1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?
     
    When CSC Admissions Representatives are in the field recruiting, they complete evaluation forms about each high school visit, college fair, transfer fair and community information drop they complete. These evaluation forms include the number, grade and receptivity of the students who visited with the Representative, the size of the senior class, the size of the junior class, the date of the school’s honor night and the date of graduation.

A.     By gathering this information the Admissions Office can plan to meet the needs of the upcoming classes and plan with the Financial Aid Office for the timely printing and distribution of scholarship certificates. The correct spelling of the high school counselor’s name, address of the school, phone number, e-mail address and best hours to meet are recorded by each Representative in a database so that future appointments can easily be completed. The Representatives also receive feedback (and occasionally referrals with prospect names) from alumni. This information is forwarded, as needed to the Admission Director/CSC Alumni Office.

B.     Representatives also conduct regular environmental scanning. For example when a Representative sees an advertising opportunity in a high school or a mall, they collect pertinent information such as the cost(s) and point of contact name. Upon returning to the Admissions Office, discuss the opportunities with the Director. If further research is needed, it is conducted, then a decision is made about return on investment and funds may be allocated for the opportunity from the operating budget.

C.     We have written a request and received funding of $6,000 for a new tour cart. This has made a positive impact upon campus visitors. A proposal was also written requesting funds for a holographic poster. This project was not funded. The Admissions Office is quite involved in the One-Stop student services shop planned for Crites Hall. This project has been supported by Vision 2011 funds. We plan to write a request for a plasma announcement board on which to list the names of our visitors and other announcements for visitors to view while they are waiting in the Crites Lobby.

 

  1. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

The success of our plans and initiatives are assessed in: staff meetings, orientation planning meetings, staff evaluations, and recruiting meetings such as the “Fall Wrap Up”. We analyze student, parent and staff evaluations of Orientation. We ask our student tour guides and assistants for feedback regarding various Admissions initiatives and we consider their comments when planning future efforts. In this way, improvements can be based on the best possible customer service for the students and not staff opinions alone. Campus tour evaluations are shared with Representatives and faculty members.

A.     The 8-10 regional high school counselors who serve on our CSC Advisory Council meet with the Director and other Student Services personnel twice a year and provide feedback about the quality of CSC programs and services, as told to them by their students or from their firsthand experience. Currently no other evaluation processes are conducted with constituencies off campus.

B.     Assessment data is stored as Word document files by the Director, Office Assistants, Admissions Representatives and Admissions Coordinators. Formal assessments are forwarded to the Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Management.

 

 3. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

Our unit is aware of the growing number of home-schooled students in our region and we have made plans to attract this demographic by placing information in the Western Nebraska Home School newsletter and purchasing exhibit space at the Homeschoolers of Wyoming annual convention in Douglas, Wyoming in May 2006.

A.     Our unit is aware of the importance of maintaining and increasing diversity among our student body and so we are involved with hosting numerous groups such as Upward Bound on campus. We are also a sponsor and vendor at the Youth Leadership Conference in Rapid City, South Dakota each spring.

B.     As far as reaching students through technology we participate in the Hobsons and Petersons web sites, participated in Chat University chat rooms and e-mail blasts. We have also researched the future possibilities regarding “pod-casting” and instant messaging (IM) in the realm of recruiting. By utilizing the EMAS software technology, we are reaching our prospects in a more consistent manner (letter, phone and e-mail).

C.     As a staff we have conducted research into the “millennials” which are the demographic we are attempting to attract in our incoming class. We utilize this knowledge: for example, millennials tend to interpret printed materials “literally” so we, in turn, spell out many more details for this generation than we did in the past.

D.     In an attempt to draw more enrollment from Colorado, a full-time Representative was placed in Colorado from 2001-2004. No additional enrollment was realized from this move. There were additional expenses related to creating a satellite office. Also training, communication and supervision issues hindered the potential of this effort.

E.      In the past, we have offered $5 gasoline vouchers for campus visitors. The funding for this was prohibitive and controlling the distribution of the vouchers was problematic, so this practice has been discontinued currently.

F.      The 2006 Orientation session will feature: “Seniors: Bring a Junior, both get in for half price”. This new feature creates an economic incentive as well as creating excitement in the class of Fall 2007.

Chadron State College Layout Image

Athletics

1.      What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

Purpose: The Chadron State College Athletic Department is dedicated to competing in a wide variety of NCAA sports with postsecondary institutions of similar size and missions. Chadron State College is currently a member of the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference. Perceived future needs of the department include: reliable and safety related travel arrangements, increased scholarship funding, facility upgrades, an increase in coaching staff numbers, and possible addition of a female sport.

 

Planning process to continue to meet this purpose and mission in the future:

            Budget implications will require a strategic fund raising plan to include outside interests who have a genuine interest in the success and longevity of the athletic program.

            Continue to provide the college and community with highly competitive athletic teams. This accomplishment will directly increase the avenues of funding to support athletic initiatives.

            Support the plan to upgrade current facilities.

            These initiatives include the continuation of our compliance with Title IX and Gender Equity issues as described in the Athletic Departments Vision 2011 statement.

 

  1. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

Assessment process and it’s improvements on the functioning of the athletic unit:

      Formal assessment process involves a comparison of budgets from past years. This being the first year of a strategic fund raising plan and the change in the Director of Athletics job description there will be no data for comparison until one year from this date.

      Facilities are currently being upgraded with new offices to meet the needs of additional female sports and a renovated strength and weight conditioning room to provide more room for all sports.

      Additional sport of women’s softball brings us in line with both Criteria two and three of the OCR demonstrated compliance mechanisms.

 

Are the results shared with regional constituents or other campus units?

      Results of the Athletic Department’s data are shared with the Nebraska State College Board of Trustees, the Federal government through the IPED report, and all campus units who make a request to review.

      Data is stored with the Office of Institutional Research as well as in the Director of Athletics’ office.

 

3.      Does the Athletic Department have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

Regional Demographics- Regional needs

      The athletic teams are highly visible thru the media in our region. This visibility provides exposure to the region and an outlet for regional entertainment and pride.

Economic Development:

      Home athletic events draw tremendous support from the area and these events provide a strong economic boost to our community and campus.

 

Child Development Center

1.      A. How do you plan for future changes, initiatives and goals on a one, five and ten year basis?

 

The Laboratory reviews and updates a five year strategic plan on a yearly basis emphasizing the role and mission of the program and supporting the long term vision for both the program and the campus.

B. Give a specific example to illustrate how this process has worked in the past.

 

The strategic planning process has assisted with the overall academic function of the Laboratory for insuring that the development of the daily routine, curriculum and assessment process follows the trends in early childhood education and supports the educational content of courses taught through the Family & Consumer Sciences program.

 

C. Explain how Vision 2011 has impacted your planning process.

 

The vision serves as a guide to the academic preparation of students and a support to the role and mission of the Laboratory. It is a vital function of the expected student learner outcomes and serves as a necessary component in the application of knowledge and skills.

 

 

2. A. Describe how your unit measures the success of plans and initiatives.

 

The main staff in the CSC Child Development Center Laboratory ask students to complete a packet of information including a self-study at the onset of involvement in the program.

 

Throughout the time the student is actively engaged in the day to day routine of the program, on-going evaluation is completed including anecdotal notes supporting the observation of the student in action. Weekly reports are shared with the student along with on-going training and support.

 

Staff trainings are held on a weekly basis and include topics that will support the needs of students in their daily learning process.

 

Student evaluations are completed and presented at staff conferences at least twice a year. All records including photos, videotapes and documentation of student outcomes are kept on file in the Laboratory.

 

B. How has this assessment process, using data, helped you achieve your unit goals?

 

Information from the assessments are evaluated each semester and each year. The outcomes from those assessments are used to support yearly strategic planning efforts and to update records, reports, files and support documents for the program.

 

All information is used to assist in the up-dating of the five year strategic plan and business plan developed for the Laboratory.

C. How are the results of your assessment shared, and with whom do you share them?

 

Currently, results from assessments are shared with the student and main staff. At times, faculty become involved with the information as needed to determine knowledge and skill development and/or the need for changes in the program.

 

D. In what media do you store this data?

The information is stored in staff file folders and Microsoft Word documents.

 

 

 

 

E. Where is it stored, and how can it be accessed?

 

All information is stored in the CSC Child Development Center Laboratory and can be accessed by contacting the Center director.

 

 

3. List your unit’s specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development, or regional needs.

 

Specific initiatives for promoting the use of the Laboratory consist of the following:

-         Development of a Communications and Marketing notebook complete with power point presentation, advertisements, website, CD, videotape, posters, brochures and historical review.

-         Development of a new brochure (2006) for the Laboratory

-         Development of a Marketing and Recruitment tool with Applied Sciences department including brochures, videotapes, DVD, website and additional packets of information for students

-         Development of a business plan for CSC administrators

-         Development of a power point presentation for presenting the business plan

-         Collaboration with CSC admissions

-         Advertisements with the Chadron Child Care Providers Association

-         Appearances on radio, parades and newspaper

-         Active involvement in regional, state and national organizations as director of the CSC Child Development Center

 

Cultural Programs & College Relations

1.      A. How do you plan for future changes, initiatives and goals on a one, five and ten year basis?

 

College Relations is actively committed to changes in technology and the transfer of information for timely reports in the information age.

 

B. Give a specific example to illustrate how this process has worked in the past.

 

The College Relations team has informally helped train employees across campus in advances in technology, communication and advertising.

 

C. Explain how Vision 2011 has impacted your planning process.

 

Vision 2011 has given voice to the needs and goals of the campus. College Relations has reacted by creating ways to develop visibility and pride from within the campus.

1)      Advertising shirts for all employees

2)      Creating a mascot in a specially decorated classic VW to be in regional parades and events

3)      Unifying publications with identity standards

4)      Sponsoring events designed to build spirit and camaraderie

 

  1. A. Describe how your unit measures the success of plans and initiatives.

 

College Relations has a clipping service and keeps track of the numbers of articles printed in specific publications. Personnel have made personal visits to regional newspapers to thank them for their responses to press releases and to give them some piece of CSC marketing “gifts”.

 

Cultural programming assesses success by the number of people attending events and the follow-up comments that are made. Cultural Programming has no formal assessment.

 

B. How has this assessment process, using data, helped you achieve your unit goals?

 

Attempts are being made to trace responses to radio and newspaper advertising by asking people to respond to a specific name for each type of advertising. This is a new venture with little data to judge.

 

C. How are the results of your assessment shared, and with whom do you share them?

Within the team.

 

D. In what media do you store this data?

 

Clippings are kept in binders.

 

E. Where is it stored, and how can it be accessed?

 

The binders are stored in Kline 231 storage area.

 

  1. List your unit’s specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development, or regional needs.

 

Cultural programming is in the process of collecting information from employees in all sectors of the campus to be listed in a Speakers Bureau. The list will offer special expertise to interested communities and organizations to use Chadron State personnel as a resource for regional needs and interests.

 

 

Extended Campus Programs

  1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

The Asst. Vice President for Extended Campus sits on the Vice President for Academic Affairs’ Council and meets routinely with school deans, academic department chairs, and student service department heads. The AVP periodically conducts staff meetings with all or selected members of ECP. Based on evidence from various assessments, focus groups throughout the service region, anecdotal evidence from former, current, and prospective students, enrollment data, and current trends and literature, decisions are made about existing and prospective programs, delivery methods, student services, policies, and procedures. The mission of CSC and ECP, as well as the vision detailed in Vision 2011, establishes the goals and objectives for ECP. Departmental budget allocations are made and adjusted as needed to meet departmental and institutional goals and objectives. When appropriate, funds are requested from Vision 2011 and other general fund sources.

 

  1. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and accessed?

 

Historically, regular assessment of students and faculty have helped improve delivery of ITV, correspondence, and online classes. Results of the assessments have been shared with members of the unit and with others who were involved in subsequent decision-making processes. Student and faculty assessments have resulted in many changes within the unit, including

        Upgrading audio/video in ITV

        Adopting online delivery

        Making subsequent changes in online course management software

        Adding and deleting programs and courses offered via distance learning, including degree completion programs

        Creating opportunities for faculty training

        Employing a distance learning student services coordinator

        Numerous policy and procedural changes

 

Future plans for assessment are described in Criteria One.

 

Currently, assessment data is not routinely shared with campus or regional constituents unless requested. Historically, assessment data has been stored by each sub unit in both hard and computer files. In the future, all assessment data will be collated by the AVP and will be available to interested internal and external constituencies.

 

  1. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development, or regional needs?

 

Extended Campus Programs primarily focuses on meeting regional needs for academic programming. The emphasis of most initiatives is on access to, and the variety, delivery, and usefulness of, academic courses and degree programs that meet the needs of CSC’s geo-political service region. ECP has, and continues, to participate in economic development initiatives as requested and when opportunities exist. Regional demographics are addressed through the variety of programs, delivery modalities and alternative learning opportunities of through ECP.

 

 

 

Financial Aid

1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

Each year in January, the Financial Aid Office receives software updates for our integrated system (SIS+) that incorporate changes for the upcoming awarding cycle. These changes are usually driven by the United States Department of Education. Our software provider will submit new enhancements to SIS+ and the student services component (Campus Pipeline) at this same time. Each year, we review the technical enhancements of our student services component and implement changes that compliment our recruitment and retention efforts. In addition, our professional staff regularly attends training opportunities provided by the United States Department of Education which covers both technical and compliance topics, SCT (software provider) training and regional and state conferences. Our support staff attends professional development training sessions when the opportunities exist. These training opportunities enhance the skills and knowledge of our staff which allows us to better serve our clientele and maintain the integrity and compliance of the programs. Our budget is supportive of our training needs. In the past, we have also received financial support for training opportunities from our campus Professional Staff organization. These opportunities connect with Vision 2011 in the fact it enriches the quality of life of our staff and those we serve.

 

2.      Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

The Financial Aid Office annually submits the fiscal year end report to the United States Department of Education. The State of Nebraska conducts an annual audit of several financial aid files and procedures for a number of compliance requirements. As a result, the annual audit report prepared by the State of Nebraska is then submitted to the United States Department of Education for review. Our past eight audits have been reported with no findings. We continue to analyze our Scholarship yield rates and make changes to packaging philosophy if necessary provided funds are available. We continue to monitor the timeframes in which our financial aid applicants apply and send notices to those who have not yet applied. These notices are sent via email with the first being mailed May 1, the second June1, and third and final July 1. Since we have started this effort in 2004-05 compared to 2005-06, the numbers of those who had not applied decreased from the previous year, so fewer notices were obviously mailed out. Each year we review our financial aid packaging philosophy. Our current philosophy is to target federal/state grants to freshmen and sophomore students with Expected Family Contributions of $2000 or less. These students are considered to be our neediest students and do not have the ability to borrow at the levels of the juniors and seniors. Goal is to help fill the gap for covering educational expenses without increasing the need for additional student and parent loans.

 

Target Nebraska Tuition Waiver (need based waiver) to juniors and seniors with need and who have at least a 3.0 grade point average. Goal is to provide need based gift assistance, acknowledge their academic accomplishments, and to fill the gap of available scholarship dollars for the upperclassmen.

 

Student loans are not automatically packaged unless the students request consideration for student loans (part of the CSC Financial Aid Application). This philosophy is different from other institutions. Our goal is to help students keep their debt loads to manageable levels. Last calculated, our graduating students have an average of $11,900 in student loan debt. These debt levels appear to be very manageable as our current Default Rate is 2.2% which equates to 97.8% of our students are repaying their student loans on time.

 

We are also in the process of developing a customer satisfaction student survey.

 

 3. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

The Financial Aid Office has approximately 10 local off campus organizations in which we contract with to provide work study opportunities for our students each year. Several of these sites are designated as Community Service sites. In addition, several work study students participate in the America Reads Programs which is a reading tutor program geared to assist third grade and younger students in reading activities. These sites include the Chadron City Schools, C-Pride after school program, the Child development Center and the local public library.

 

The Financial Aid Office continues to enhance the on-line financial aid services. Currently, all students can complete the financial aid process on-line from our Financial Aid web page and through their personalized Campus Pipeline accounts. This allows students at a distance, the opportunity to complete the process without visiting the office/campus. Our Financial Aid Counselor also visits our extended campus sites in the Fall and Spring semesters to meet with our distance students in a one-on-one environment.

 

Health Services

1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

The planning for this area involves data collection related to number and types of visits. This is an ongoing process of trying new approaches or ideas and assessing the success based on attendance, feedback through surveys, impact on the campus, etc. I also try to stay connected with peers to stay abreast of the types of services and programs they are offering and how those may benefit our students. The budgeting is planned in response to anticipated needs. For example, we recently started the CSC Clinic and the providers for the clinic are contracted for 2 hours daily so that initiative drives that budget. The statistics of how many students we have need to do tests such as strep, mono, pregnancy, etc. helps plan the budget for testing supplies. The statistics or data collected is key to planning.

The planning is connected to Vision 2011 in many ways:

Institutional Community – Student Recruitment and Retention

I am well aware of the need to have services that are needed and attractive to incoming students and parents. I am also aware that large medical bills and chronic health problems can be a barrier to continuing to attend classes.

Institutional Community – Under-represented Populations

Health Services are available to all students regardless of finances, age etc. Students without insurance or with free access to health care but with transportation barriers (such as Native American students and IHS) are all equally able to access care at Health Services and the CSC Clinic.

 

Public Relations – Community Relations

I have to be aware of how the services I offer impact the community resources. I never want CSC to be viewed as a competitor. I also need to be aware of things that I could offer that would decrease the strain on our local resources. I need to stay updated on what those resources are and how and if they want to receive referrals from CSC.

 

Regional Service – Collaboration

The need to collaborate with local resources is great in order to increase efficiency of the health dollars spent by our students.

 

Regional Service – Responsiveness

The demographic of our students is important to the planning of services. For example, we have some out-of-state students with HMO plans that are wonderful in their state but are not accepted here. We have many students from self-employed agricultural families that may not have insurance or only have a major medical plan with a very high deductible. We also have many non-traditional students that may have had insurance through an employer in the past but are now full-time students and are without coverage. So it is important to know what types of students are attending CSC and to factor their probable situations into the services that are needed.

 

  1. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

The assessment of plans and initiatives in Health Services are primarily based on numbers served. For instance, I keep a daily log of visits and based on the previous semesters numbers I was able to track the increase number of visits and request an Office Assistant to help with the increased workload documented by the daily log. I also keep track of the number of immunizations given and if a certain vaccine was found to not be in demand and I have had to destroy vaccine because of out-dating then I would discontinue offering that vaccine and research the local resources where I could refer the occasional request for that vaccine. I also keep track of visits to the CSC Clinic and statistics on what days of the week are utilized less or more in the event that we would need to cut down our days because of lack of provider interest or other reasons. I also request a survey from students that visit the CSC Clinic and compile the data from the survey.

 

The assessment has improved the functioning by giving a way to document use of services. Most recently the data was used to document the need for an increase of staff by showing a 62% increase in visits.

 

The result of the assessment is shared with the Dean of Students. I am unaware of who else may receive the data. The results are shared verbally and with written reports at times.

 

The assessment data is mostly stored on spreadsheets. They are very simple and basically the data is entered for ease of sorting and for the purpose of reporting.

 

  1. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

The CSC clinic was a Vision 2011 initiative in 2004-2005 and was related to regional demographics and regional needs.

 

Housing & Residence Life Office

1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

The Residence Life Office compiles a report that gives summary of all programs offered during the academic year. This report is reviewed and discussed to make appropriate changes for future programming. During the academic year, the Assistant Director of Residence Life Programs, the Residence Hall Directors, and Residence Hall Coordinator meet on a weekly basis specifically to discuss programming progress and programming toward any student needs that arise. Also during the academic year, the Residence Hall Directors and Residence Hall Coordinator meet with their staff on a weekly basis, the Resident Advisors of the respective buildings, and discuss programming. During each of these meetings, resources for offering these programs, including budgets, are discussed.

 

The Residence Life Staff parallels the Vision 2011 focus areas in multiple ways.

        Institutional Community Residence Life Staff follows the programming model, which includes focusing on developing character, citizenship, civility, and diversity through programming. Residence Life Staff also promotes an environment where students can live, learn, and excel by building community on the floors in each residence hall.

        Public Relations Residence Life Staff assists in the recruitment of new students by offering show rooms for visiting students and families to see. Again, Residence Life Staff promotes an environment where students can live, learn, and excel in their whole academic experience.

        Regional Service Residence Life Staff offers a Honors Fair annually in collaboration with the Chadron Middle School to encourage the education of young people and provide mentoring opportunities for current students. Other individual programs also offer service to the region, including the Blankets for the Needy program offered this year as well as several Blood Drives brought to campus by Residence Life Staff.

        Research, Scholarly and Creative Activity Residence Life Staff offers educational opportunities outside of the classroom. Because students are not required to attend these events, creative programming is necessary to reach students. For example, Sunday Sundae, was a diversity program offered to show cultural differences in how sundaes are topped differently in different countries.

        Resources and Facilities programming offered by the Residence Life Staff encourages a healthy safe learning environment. In a few specific cases, programs have been directed purposely toward improving kitchen and study room areas.

        Teaching and Learning Residence Life Staff offer educational opportunities outside of the classroom through programming. These programs are offered to enrich the holistic learning experience of students by implementing the Residence Life programming model.

 

2. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

The Residence Life Department currently assesses the success of programming through program evaluations, discussions at weekly programming meetings, and annual programming reports. These evaluations and discussions allow staff to adjust and/or modify programs, presentation of programs, and offering of programs to meet student’s needs. A program report is compiled annually and submitted to the Director of Housing and Residence Life. Results of Residence Life programming is also shared at the Senate Finance Committee budget hearings annually. Successful and unsuccessful programming ideas are also shared with peers on a regional and national level through list serves in which staff posts comments, ideas, and questions to. The program evaluations and program reports are currently stored in three-ring binders in the Housing and Residence Life Offices.

 

3. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

The Residence Life Staff offers several programs that are related to these needs. Examples of such programs include:

        Honors Fair – collaborates with the Chadron Middle Schools to mentor students and develop a project.

        Blood Drives – collaborates with regional groups such as CSC Health Services, United Blood Services, and the Red Cross to collect donated blood for blood banks.

        Women’s Leadership Series – programming designed to educate and enhance women’s skills and leadership abilities.

        Peace by Piece – program to educate people about diversity, specifically dealing with racial discrimination, gender, and sexual orientations.

        Residence Life offers programming on Scholastic’s Day to offer students a fun, safe, alcohol-free atmosphere to interact in.

 

Institutional Research

1.      A. How do you plan for future changes, initiatives and goals on a one, five and ten year basis?

Since I am new to the position, I am still gathering information to begin planning. However, I have determined that the published CSC Fact Book and the IR web site very much out of date and am working to update them. In addition, I have determined that there has not been a master calendar of cyclical reports and requests and I am making one of these as well to aid in planning of work load. In addition, will be using other technology tools such as Tableau, Excel and other software to query, organize and present data.

B. Give a specific example to illustrate how this process has worked in the past.

No example available.

 

C. Explain how Vision 2011 has impacted your planning process.

No specific IR examples, I have a good understanding of Vision 2011 and so will continue to use it to guide my planning processes.

 

  1. A. Describe how your unit measures the success of plans and initiatives.

Since I am getting news each week of upcoming reports and deadlines, the only measures of success so far has been meeting those deadlines. However, have developed some ideas to improve information presentation and access that have been shared with internal leaders for future projects.

B. How has this assessment process, using data, helped you achieve your unit goals?

I don’t personally have any knowledge of previous IR assessment.

C. How are the results of your assessment shared, and with whom do you share them?

D. In what media do you store this data?

E. Where is it stored, and how can it be accessed?

 

  1. List your unit’s specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development, or regional needs.

 

No initiatives have been developed so far but will most likely be supporting other areas that have developed such initiatives.

 

 

International Student Program

  1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

International student enrollment has been a part of the overall planning of the unit see response to Criterion 1 Question 3.

 

  1. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning on your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and accessed?

 

Plans and initiatives relating to enrollment of international students are assessed through the change of admissions application completions and enrollments as described in response to Criterion 1. In addition, input from current CSC students and alumni as well as staff who work with international students is sought with regard to how to improve services. This is generally captured within the minutes of the International Student’s Committee minutes and report that is submitted to the President’s office as an appointed committee. The 2004-05 report is attached for your review.

 

  1. Does your unit have any specific initiatives relating to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

Goals relating to international students generally focus outside of the U.S. because CSC is only authorized to accept students with F-1 visas and not J-1 visas which high school exchange students typically have. However, there has been some focus on working with service organizations such as Rotary to communicate enrollment opportunities at CSC. In addition, work has been done to connect with regional community colleges to encourage transfer students to enroll at CSC. See International Students Committee 2004-05 report for more information.

 

Internships & Career Services

1.      A. How do you plan for future changes, initiatives and goals on a one, five and ten year basis?

No formal goal planning on the unit level has taken place since Internship & Career Services merged; however changes are implemented on an on-going basis in response to needs as they arise.

B. Give a specific example to illustrate how this process has worked in the past. Unknown

C. Explain how Vision 2011 has impacted your planning process.

Assessment plans for both Internship & Career Services have been developed and are included with this report.

 

  1. A. Describe how your unit measures the success of plans and initiatives.

Satisfaction survey, placement survey, and enrollment tracking.

B. How has this assessment process, using data, helped you achieve your unit goals?

Satisfaction surveys assist in making administrative changes, placement survey could be used in recruiting new students or to help departments make curriculum changes. Enrollment tracking could assist in marketing the internship program.

C. How are the results of your assessment shared, and with whom do you share them?

Enrollment tracking has been shared with my supervisor (previously Steve Taylor). Placement Report is available to anyone at our web page, and satisfaction survey data is used internally by our unit.

D. In what media do you store this data?

Enrollment data is on an Excel spreadsheet, Placement Report is available on our web page, and satisfaction surveys are compiled as hard copies.

E. Where is it stored, and how can it be accessed?

Enrollment data spreadsheet is on Deborah’s computer, Placement Report data is stored by Janet, and satisfaction surveys are stored by the Director.

 

  1. List your unit’s specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development, or regional needs.

Specific initiatives for internship are:

- to continue working closely with area businesses and agencies who frequently have interns, some of which rely on them heavily

- to make internship easily coordinated and performed from a distance location by increasing availability of forms and information on-line

Specific initiatives for career services are:

- to market career services available to local and area businesses and agencies

- to create a career development “curriculum”

- to increase availability of career services to distance students by making more available on-line

 

Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center

1.      A. How do you plan for future changes, initiatives and goals on a one, five and ten year basis?

B. Give a specific example to illustrate how this process has worked in the past.

C. Explain how Vision 2011 has impacted your planning process.

The center plans exhibits early enough to allow for teachers to incorporate it into class and allow more student involvement. An annual report which contains the previous year’s budget, events, and attendance also assists in the planning process. The Center Director is currently beginning the process of writing a new strategic plan for the unit. The staff takes into consideration feedback from visitors and any other concerns noted, taking into consideration goals for Vision 2011.

 

Vision 2011

CSC Strategic Plan

MSHPHC Mission

And

Applied History

Focus Area:

Institutional Community

 

Academic Freedom

and Responsibility

The MSHPHC aids to the academic freedom and responsibility of the college by

  • Hosting scholarly and professional conferences
  • Providing an avenue for artistic and cultural exhibitions

Building a Culture of Innovation

The MSHPHC continues to

  • Evaluate and improve temporary, permanent, and traveling exhibition through a variety of methods. The MSHPHC also works with other departments and units on campus to provide support and innovation to their curricula.
  • Revise its documents and policies in order to keep current with the needs and expectations of its constituents

Environment

While it is difficult to document the MSHPHC institutional culture of support and respect, the Center does

  • Host the now annual “Snack and Study” event during Finals Week. This event is to provide a safe and quiet environment to assist in student learning and convey to students that the MSHPHC does support their learning
  • Assist with the construction and distribution of the Finals Week gift bags assembled by the White Buffalo Club for Native-American Students at Chadron State College
  • Encourage students and employees to display family photographs and mementoes in staff areas

Focus Area:

Institutional Community

 

Ethics

The MSHPHC works to foster personal and profession integrity and ethics by

  • Insuring that the subject of ethics are covered in all Applied History courses
  • Introduction and establishment of Collections Access Forms and requirements for all employees to be educated in the ethics of working with collections
  • Selection of Gift Shop materials which include issues of ethics and diverse populations.

 

Professional Development

The MSHPHC participates in the

  • State Historic Records Advisory Board, including the Director serving as a Board Member
  • Nebraska Museums Association, including hosting the 2004 Annual Meeting and the Director serving as the organization’s President
  • Mountain-Plains Museums Association, a ten-state regional museums association
  • American Association for State and Local History
  • Association of College and University Museums and Galleries
  • Pioneers and Indians Tourism Group
  • Western Nebraska Tourism Coalition

Recognizing Achievement

The MSHPHC recognizes institutional and student achievement by

  • Featuring institutional awards in entry areas
  • Using the work of students in research and development of exhibits
  • Entering publications and materials produced by students in regional competitions
  • Posting clippings and announcements of student and staff achievement on the Staff Bulletin Board

Student Recruitment and Retention

The MSHPHC assists with student recruitment and retention by

  • Assisting with facility tours to perspective students and student’s families.
  • Assisting with Native-American Welcome Day
  • Accompanying admissions to Oglala Lakota College to work on collaborative efforts to assist both institutions with retention and recruitment
  • Hosting “Snack and Study” events during finals week. By providing a clearly designated place to study, we are aiding in retention by giving students a supportive learning environment
  • Promoting the Applied History program at Chadron State College. This program is currently the only program in the State of Nebraska offering museum training.
  • Providing materials to the Admissions for mailings to perspective students. These materials demonstrate to students that Chadron State College has unique features and demonstrates its niche in the marketplace. These materials also represent the facilities and opportunities at Chadron State College
  • Responding to requests of students for information for their projects at not only the collegiate level, but also the high school and elementary school level. By responding in a timely and positive manner, these students will have a favorable impression of Chadron State College and will aid in recruitment and retention efforts.
  • Working with area youth groups.
  • Sandoz Festival

Under-represented populations

The MSHPHC works with Underrepresented populations by

  • Beginning to work with Oglala Lakota College to promote understanding and educate individuals about the Lakota culture
  • Being home to the Chadron State College Tiyospaye Room, which is a gathering place for Chadron State College students
  • Support of the White Buffalo Club
  • Development and distribution of an African-American History month calendar, which has lead to the development of the Chadron State College Diversity Calendar
  • Working with Diversity Committee - Hispanic Month sub-committee on developing an exhibition in 2005-2006 school year

Focus Area: Public Relations

  •  

Alumni Relations

The MSHPHC works with Alumni and Development Office by

  • Serving as a facility for Class Reunions
  • Including the Office on our distribution lists for events being held at the Center
  • Featuring exhibitions by Chadron State College Alumni
  • Creating and exhibiting an exhibit on the history of Chadron State College, this exhibit was researched and constructed by students.

Community Relations

The MSHPHC works to maintain positive relations with the local and regional community by

  • Featuring events of local and regional interest which are open to the public at little or no cost
  • Encouraging volunteerism at the MSHPHC
  • Making our facilities available to the public at little cost for private events
  • Collaborating with other organizations and business and informing the public about these collaborations

Fiscal Accountability

The MSHPHC demonstrates fiscal accountability by

  • Distributing Annual Reports, which include financial information and graphs, to constituent groups and College administration
  • Contacting endowment and account donors at the end of the fiscal year detailing the expenditure of funds from the interest of the investments made on behalf of the Center
  • Annual audit of all State of Nebraska funds conducted by the State of Nebraska auditors

Marketing

The MSHPHC works to promote itself through

  • Development and publication of new brochures, and distributing those locally, regionally, and statewide
  • Partnership with Chadron State College and Chadron State College students, developing a new web-site for MSHPHC and developing new content for said site
  • Participation in Professional Organizations
  • State and regional media articles
  • Development and distribution of invitations and posters promoting upcoming events and exhibits
  • Establishment of a MSHPHC newsletter
  • Development and circulation of traveling exhibitions

Focus Area: Regional Service

 

Collaboration

The MSHPHC works to be of service to the region through collaboration with the

  • Nebraska Humanities Council
  • Nebraska Environmental Trust
  • Nebraska State Historical Society
  • Nebraska Statewide Arboretum
  • Nebraska Museums Association

 

The Center also works to provide service to the region by

  • Bringing “Key Ingredients” from the Smithsonian Institution, through the Nebraska Humanities Council, and related programming to local and regional schools and community groups
  • Assisting students with History Day projects. History Day is sponsored on the Chadron State College Campus by the Social Science and Justice Studies Department
  • Providing guided tours and working with tour operators
  • Working with other institutions to produce and provide traveling exhibits

Distributed Learning

The MSHPHC works to provide distributed learning through

  • No Child Left Behind Classes in conjunction with other departments. The majority of these classes will be hybrid classes with students participating on-line and on campus for just a few day
  • Workshops hosted by the MSHPHC, including quilt preservation and grant writing, which will becoming up in the fall 2005
  • Internships. The MSHPHC has helped to distribute information about the internship programs offered at Chadron State College to museums and archives throughout Nebraska. These diverse experiences will help to make our students well rounded and marketable.

Leadership

The MSHPHC has been a leader in our region through

  • Education in the field in museum work
  • Establishment of digital imaging laboratory

 

MSHPHC staff has shown leadership in the region by

  • Serving as President of the Nebraska Museums Association
  • Serving as a State Historical Records Advisory Board Member

Responsiveness

The MSHPHC has shown responsiveness to the region and market factors by

  • Establishing and developing the Applied History program
  • Working with the Chadron State College Internship Program to find placements for students; providing internship placements for students; and offering endowed internship positions
  • Working with local and regional tourism promotion groups including Pioneers and Indians Tourism Coalition, which is a tourism group made up of organizations from South Dakota and Nebraska
  • Working with the Reta King Library to place the MSHPHC library materials on-line to make these materials more accessible to researchers and the general public
  • Evaluating the feasibility of creating virtual exhibits for the MSHPHC website. These exhibits would be two-fold. First, the MSHPHC would place collections that are currently not on display in the Center on display, via the web. This will increase the number of people who have access to the collection. Secondly, we think that this will be a service to distance students who are unable to come to the MSHPHC to see the exhibits that are on display, allowing them to have a fuller collegiate experience.

Focus Area:

Research, Scholarly, and

Creative Activity

 

Collaboration

The MSHPHC is working in collaboration with various academic units including Social Science, Family and Consumer Science, Art, Botany, Geography, and Paleontology to bring exhibits to campus that complement the curricula of these and other departments on campus. The Center is also working to with these departments to provide research opportunities to students.

 

Funding

The MSHPHC utilizes funding to promote research, scholarship, and creativity by

  • Bring exhibits from other organizations to campus to help broaden discussions and perspectives
  • Providing internship to Chadron State College students to conduct research on the collections housed at the MSHPHC
  • Working to place the collections housed at the MSHPHC on-line

Support

The MSHPHC supports research, scholarship, and creativity by

  • Providing Endowed Internships
  • Providing accesses and resources for various research endeavors
  • Using the ITV connections at the MSHPHC for various teleconferences featuring topics such diverse topics as student retention and literature

Focus Area:

Resources and Facilities

 

Allocation of Resources

Usage of the facilities and resources and the allocation of those resources can be found in the Sandoz Center Annual Reports

Facilities

Facilities added to or a part of the MSHPHC which add to the Campus include

  • Heritage Trail/Alternative Transportation Trail from the west side of the Center through the Thompson Nature Preserve. The trail serves as not only as an outdoor learning laboratory, but also a recreational area on campus and for the community
  • ITV Classroom, used for teleconferences, as well as educational classroom needs
  • Integration into the Campus Maintenance Plan. This integration will help the facilities maintain its attractiveness and safety
  • Integration into the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum. This also adds not only to the interpretation of Mari Sandoz and her family, but also a reference for botanical collections and other departments, scholars, and visitors
  • Retrofitting the building during remodeling for ADA compliance

Funding Sources

The Center is not currently actively involved in looking for additional funding sources.

Personnel Recruitment and Retention

The Center is not directly involved in personnel recruitment and retention

Technology and Equipment

The MSHPHC provides current teaching and learning – related technology and equipment by housing the/a/an

  • Octavo Lab
  • Light Meter
  • Daylight Lamp
  • HEPA Vacuum
  • Hygrothermograph

Focus Area:

Teaching and Learning

 

Alternative Learning Opportunities

  • Internships
  • Employment at Center
  • Workshops
  • Students having the option to volunteer at the Center for course credit

Assessment

  • Program Review and Revisions was slated for Summer of 05 (delayed due to administrative changes)

Breadth and Depth of Knowledge

  • Program Review

Broad Perspective

  • Applied History – History and Philospohy
  • The study of historic museum innovators
  • Definition of Center, purpose to promote history of region
  • Native-American exhibits

Diversity

  • Administration, Exhibits, Collections
  • MSHPHC Exhibit Planning
  • Diversity Committee
  • Ty Christian Presentation
  • NPS Speaker
  • Gift Shop – support materials for classes

Enriched and Supportive Learning Environment

  • Multiple forms of evaluation
  • Internship

Information Literacy

  • Electronic and paper-based
  • Objects based
  • Microfilm
  • Videos

Student Advising and Career Services

  • One-on-One consultation
  • Career Services
  • Post internship and job announcements

Student Centered Learning

  • Grant Writing
  • Exhibit Proposals
  • Internships
  • Employment

Teaching and Learning Technology

  • Evaluation of Move to On-line program and Courses

 

  1. A. Describe how your unit measures the success of plans and initiatives.

B. How has this assessment process, using data, helped you achieve your unit goals?

C. How are the results of your assessment shared, and with whom do you share them?

D. In what media do you store this data?

E. Where is it stored, and how can it be accessed?

The Center evaluates the success of events and exhibits by utilizing comments from a suggestion box and keeping an attendance record. The Sandoz staff members study an employee training manual and are available and prepared to answer questions from visitors.

  1. List your unit’s specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development, or regional needs.

The center explores regional demographics and regional needs by serving as a resource for education. It specializes in topics concerning Native Americans. Information about the center is also found through the internet and can be accessed from all over the region.

Nelson Physical Activity Center (NPAC)

1.      A. How do you plan for future changes, initiatives and goals on a one, five and ten year basis?

Enforce all users have current ID’s to use the facility. This will generate some funding to update and maintain facility.

B. Give a specific example to illustrate how this process has worked in the past.

Replacement and maintenance of machines encourage users to come back. Offer a number of events for the students to participate in.

C. Explain how Vision 2011 has impacted your planning process.

 

 

  1. A. Describe how your unit measures the success of plans and initiatives.

Year end reports in intramurals to see which events were successful. Surveys to the students and NPAC users.

B. How has this assessment process, using data, helped you achieve your unit goals? Determine the wants and needs of users.

C. How are the results of your assessment shared, and with whom do you share them? Supervisors, colleagues

D. In what media do you store this data? Not sure

E. Where is it stored, and how can it be accessed? Not sure

 

  1. List your unit’s specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development, or regional needs.

 

Not Answered

 

Reta E. King Library

1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

There are collegial staff meetings at least once a month to discuss all aspects of the library: each member is considered an expert in certain facets of library operations and shares that knowledge during the planning process (e.g., technical services, electronic resources, reference, circulation, budgeting, etc.). Each member describes needs, costs, and alternatives. Whenever possible, a consensus of expenditures is sought. A list of desiderata is created and prioritized. The librarians contribute daily to the overall Vision 2011, especially regarding improved information literacy, student-centered learning, continuous assessment of our users, improved information-access technology (e.g., wireless) and making the library (both virtually and physically) into a one-stop information service.

 

2. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

A noted professional library consultant, Ben Wakashige, was employed in 2003-04 to interview and survey the campus community regarding the relevancy of the King Library to the overall college mission and goals. His Benchmark Study suggested several areas in which the Library could improve its campus-wide effectiveness, visibility and resources (materials, building and personnel). From this document, a King Library Strategic Plan (2004) was created. Then, when a new Director was hired in August of 2005, he worked with the librarians and staff to create an Implementation Plan (2005). All of this has been shared with the college administration and those teaching faculty who were interested. All documents are saved on computer disks in the office of the Library Director and available upon request.

 

3. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

The King Library works closely (shares a common computerized circulation system) with the two other colleges (Peru and Wayne) in the Nebraska State College System. The King Library works with the Chadron Public Library, the Sandoz Center, the Dawes County Historical Society, and with the Nebraska Library Commission as well as the Nebraska Panhandle Library Association. The King Library constantly looks for opportunities to cooperate with other libraries and cultural associations for the betterment of all information institutions, the college, and the community.

 

Student Activities Office/Campus Activities Board (CAB)

1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

The Senate Finance Committee allocates money to the various groups to be used for programming. The Campus Activities Board (CAB) receives the bulk of the money from the budget. During the academic school year, members of CAB meet weekly to plan the programs. Since CAB is made up from representatives of different clubs and organizations on campus, there is a good cross section of constituents. Money is allocated only if there is a majority vote in favor of the program.

 

The Campus Activities Board parallels the Vision 2011 focus areas in a multiple of ways.

        Institutional Community – The Office of Student Activities promotes an environment that encourages and assists students, faculty, and staff in realizing their potential and reaching their aspirations.

        Public Relations - The Office of Student Activities builds strong public and political support by promoting Chadron State College as a place where students can live, learn, and excel during their college career.

        Regional Service – The Office of Student Activities aspires to improve the quality of services to the western High Plains states by providing information, activities, and opportunities for the current activities.

        Research, Scholarly, and Creative Activity – The Office of Student Activities offers educational opportunities outside the classroom that provides the students an environment leading to self –actualization and to develop the “whole person.”

        Resource and Facilities – The Office of Student Activities encourages a healthy safe learning environment and strive to expand and effectiveness of resource and facilities such as the Student Center.

        Teaching and Learning – The Office of Student Activities offers educational opportunities outside of the classroom by providing activities and events that are geared toward a “teachable moments.”

 

2.      Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

The Office of Student Activities currently assess the success of its programs by weekly meeting of the Campus Activities Board and surveying people who have attended the events on what they liked and did not like and what the members would like to see in the future.

 

3. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional

demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

The Office of Student Activities helps with various groups such as the Diversity Committee in providing funding, activities, and support for such events as the annual Powwow, during Native American Month, Black History Month events such as speakers and co-sponsored with the Pine Ridge Job Corps, A Haunted House with a Historical Twist held at Fort Robinson State Park, co sponsorship of street dances, Good Morning Chadron, “Uptown on Campus” where the local businesses are invited to campus to showcase their wares and services with the local Chamber of Commerce and open houses for the Native American high schools.

 

Student Academic Success Services

Advising

    1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

a.       Currently a focus group (sub committee from the Enrollment Management/Student Services committee) is developing a proposal to present to the committee and forward on to the Vice President of Academic affairs with a focus on undecided/undeclared students. This newly developed group of individuals will receive training and the tools needed to assist students through the Advising Center. NACADA is conducting a conference on March 17, 2006 on Lucky To Be In Advising. This conference is in Cheyenne, WY with a registration fee of $45. Topics include (a) Advising underprepared students, (b)Probationary/suspension student advising, (c) Legal issues in advising, (d) Advising via email, (e) Faculty advising best practices, (f) Creative methods of advising or working with students.

b.      Letters are currently going out to students on probation (first time), letters will also be developed to help advice students that are on continued probation and suspended.

c.       Staff from SASS and the Advising Center will be set up in the Student Center on a weekly basic for “Update Your Data”. This gives all students an opportunity to check about their demographics (address, major, and advisor). This activity will assist in keeping students on the right rotation for their course work.

d.      Non-Tradional Students: Recognizing the needs of the Non-Tradional Student, notices and meetings have informed this population of the availability of the computers in the Advising Center.

e.       Understanding the individual student and population the Advising Center and Advising standards fits with the Vision in aspiring to be a premiere Center by providing service to these populations.

f.        Students are assigned Academic Advisors once the application process is complete. Students are then notified of their Advisor, their location and phone number. Advisors are sent Advisee files with information about the student, (copy of transcripts, ACT scores, photo of the student, and other introductory information).

g.       Funds are budgeted to contract faculty to staff the center in the summer months, for operational costs, training and maintenance.

h.       The Center was funded through the first VISION 2011 Strategic, allowing an Office Assistant to be hired to coordinate staffing, schedule appointments, process Self Directed Searches, take student I.D. photos. Funding was also allocated to hire and staff the Center during the summer months with faculty advisors.

i.         Faculty that are aware of the services have used them in their classrooms (i.e. Dr. Sally Blomstrom had her students fill out the SDS).

j.        Dr. Yvonne Moody has brought her class over for tours of the services.

k.      Prospective students are given brochures about the center.

 

2.      Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

a.       A log is kept of students using the center and brief notes of the contact from the advisor.

b.      Placement testing is logged with required/recommended course work.

c.       One advisor from the center is included in group traveling to Atlanta for the First Year Experience conference.

d.      Schedule of advisors and disciplines are shared on posters, advertised in the Eagle Newspaper, and up to date on the Advising Website (www.csc.edu/sass)

e.       Assessment is stored electronically and hardcopy.

 

3.      Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

Web page sample:

CSC - Building Futures Every Day

Student Academic Success Services at Chadron State College

Go to Chadron State College Home Page

Academic Advising Center

SASS Home

Major Exploration

Major Exploration

First Year Seminar

First Year Seminar

Counseling & Disability Services

Counseling & Disability Services

Multicultural Services

Multicultural Services

Advising Center

Advising Center

Tutoring Services

Tutoring Services

Supplemental Instruction (SI)

Supplemental Instruction (SI)

Writing & Speaking Center

Writing & Speaking Center

Early Alerts

Early Alert Forms

Documents

Documents

I.D. Cards

I.D. Cards

Staff & Contact Info

Staff & Contact Information

CSC Home

Go to Chadron State College Home Page

Crites Hall Third Floor
(308) 432-6461

Mission Statement on Academic Advising

"Based on a system of shared responsibility, Chadron State College seeks to assist students in the development of meaningful educational plans that are compatible with career goals and instill a desire for lifelong learning." 
-Chadron State College Advising Committee

Academic Advising Center

Academic Advising is assisting students to share the responsibility for academic planning with the faculty advisors. The goal is to encourage students to find their own answers and utilize their advisors as sounding boards for their educational goals.

Current Advising Center Schedule

Dr. Monty Fickel, Professor of Mathematical Sciences works with a student at the Center.

Advisee Responsibilities

  • Gather relevant decision-making information
  • Clarify, goals, interests and values
  • Become knowledgeable about programs, policies, requirements and procedures
  • Accept responsibility for decisions

Advisor Responsibilities

  • Help students define and develop realistic goals
  • Identify special needs
  • Connect students to available resources
  • Assist students to plan consistent with their goals, interests, aptitudes and limitations
  • Monitor progress toward goals
  • Discuss linkage between academic preparation and careers

 

 

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Chadron State College Layout Image

CSC - Building Futures Every Day

Student Academic Success Services at Chadron State College

Go to Chadron State College Home Page

Advising Center Schedule

SASS Home

Major Exploration

Major Exploration

First Year Seminar

First Year Seminar

Counseling & Disability Services

Counseling & Disability Services

Multicultural Services

Multicultural Services

Advising Center

Advising Center

Tutoring Services

Tutoring Services

Supplemental Instruction (SI)

Supplemental Instruction (SI)

Writing & Speaking Center

Writing & Speaking Center

Early Alerts

Early Alert Forms

Documents

Documents

I.D. Cards

I.D. Cards

Staff & Contact Info

Staff & Contact Information

CSC Home

Go to Chadron State College Home Page

Crites Hall Third Floor
(308) 432-6461

Needing Help Registering for Spring Semester?
We can help! Come to the 3rd floor in Crites Hall.

 

ADVISING CENTER: Spring 2006 Schedule

 

Time

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

8:00-9:00 a.m.

 

Chuck Squier
Education

Tim Donahue
Business

 

 

9:00-10:00 a.m.

Mathew Bateman
Science

Cindy Squier
Special Education

Tracy Nobiling
Criminal Justice

 

 

10:00-11:00 a.m.

Yvonne Moody
FCS

Ottley Wright
HPER

Jim Margetts
Visual & Performing Arts

Avery Paulson
PreHealth

11:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

Deb Stewart
Social Work

 

Monty Fickel
Math

 

12:00-1:00 p.m.

 

Thomas Swanke
Economics

 

 

 

1:00-2:00 p.m.

 

 

Loren Zimmerman
Criminal Justice

Loren Zimmerman
Criminal Justice

 

2:00-3:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

3:00-4:00 p.m.

Joel Hyer
History

 

 

 

Philip Cary
Math

Other

Charles Butterfield
Agriculture

Ann Petersen
Education

 

 

 

Call SASS 432-6461 for questions or information

 

 

Faculty Advisor

Department

Color-Code

Mathew Bateman

Bateman, Mathew

Science

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Butterfield

Butterfield, Charles

Agriculture

 

 

 

 

 

Philip Cary

Cary, Philip

Math/IST

 

 

 

 

 

Tim Donahue

Donahue, Tim

Business

 

 

 

 

 

Monty Fickel

Fickel, Monty

Math

 

 

 

 

 

Joel Hyer

Hyer, Joel

History

 

 

 

 

 

Jim Margetts

Margetts, Jim

Visual & Performing Arts

 

 

 

 

 

Yvonne Moody

Moody, Yvonne

FCS

 

 

 

 

 

Tracy Nobling

Nobling, Tracy

Criminal Justice

 

 

 

 

 

Avery Paulson

Paulson, Avery

PreHealth

 

 

 

 

 

Ann Petersen

Petersen, Ann

Education

 

 

 

 

 

Deb Stewart

Stewart, Deb

Social Work

 

 

 

 

 

Chuck Squier

Squier, Chuck

Education

 

 

 

 

 

Cindy Squier

Squier, Cindy

Special Education

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Swanke

Swanke, Thomas

Economics

 

 

 

 

 

Ottley Wright

Wright, Ottley

HPER

 

 

 

 

 

Loren Zimmerman

Zimmerman, Loren

Criminal Justice

 


 

 

Have a question? Need help? Send us a message!

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Your Question

 

 

 

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Multicultural Services | Advising Center | Tutoring | Early Alert
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    1. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

Not answered

 

3. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

Not answered

 

Counselor

1.      A. How do you plan for future changes, initiatives and goals on a one, five and ten year basis?

I have a contractual obligation to continuing education in the area of disability services. I also seek continuing education as a licensed counselor. Other strategic planning takes place at a higher level.

B. Give a specific example to illustrate how this process has worked in the past.

Each year I look for continuing education opportunities in both areas and attend the ones that seem most valuable.

C. Explain how Vision 2011 has impacted your planning process.

This does not apply because such planning goes on at a higher level.

 

2.      A. Describe how your unit measures the success of plans and initiatives.

Surveys of students’ satisfaction after they have received services in either area of counseling or disability services. In counseling, I periodically assess the progress of my clients to see if they are moving toward their goals for counseling. Because this is a qualitative assessment, I do not use a standard measure of success.

B. How has this assessment process, using data, helped you achieve your unit goals?

At this time, I compile the responses of each survey, figure the average scores of the Likert scale questions, and review the results.

C. How are the results of your assessment shared, and with whom do you share them?

I give a copy of the compiled data to my supervisor.

D. In what media do you store this data?

Hard copies

E. Where is it stored, and how can it be accessed?

In a file folder in my desk

 

3.      List your unit’s specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development, or regional needs.

Instead of targeting the stated categories, I render services in response to individual need.

 

Multicultural Services

1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011 focus?

 

My planning process basically is dictated by my budget, which is very limited, but is based of the Vision 2011 focus. I feel that in order to make the MRC work according to the Vision 2011 focus it needs to be in a better location and needs more funds.

 

2. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

A. Surveys

B. No response

C. No response

D. No response

E. No response

 

3. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

I try to target all minority students as a whole; I don’t have the budget to target each individual minority group on campus.

 

Peer Tutoring Program

    1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

The planning process to enhance Tutorial Services is done through student and faculty feedback, adhering to program goals, implementing new strategies gained from reading supporting materials, visiting other Centers and attending training conferences. Our services continually work toward the ultimate goal of retention by empowering students to understand how to learn through implementation of suggested learning strategies and techniques, which in turn will create independent learners.

 

2. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

        Assessment is done on an on-going basis through daily, mid-term and end of semester evaluations by both tutor and tutee. We recently revised the evaluations to include a component making reference to learning outcomes. I believe this data has given us substantial feedback regarding “How we’re doing?” and gives us additional information to base initiatives for enhancing services.

 

        Our program has a campus constructed data base which stores student demographic information, courses, times and days of utilization. From this information we compile semester based statistics. This information is shared with the Director of Student Academic Success Services and the Tutoring Advisory Board.

 

 3. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

Our program continually strives to enhance services to students not in the traditional classroom via the virtual classroom in blackboard, e-mail tutoring and/or via television mediated classrooms. Additionally, our program hires tutors at off campus sites to assist students in those areas.

 

Transfer Student Guides

1.      What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

Transfer student enrollment has been a part of the overall planning of the unit see response to Criterion 1 Question 3.

 

2.      Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning on your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and accessed?

 

Assessment of the recruitment and enrollment process for transfer students is ongoing. Assessment processes include:

 

        Cooperative meetings between regional community college and CSC faculty have provided opportunity to identify new courses and degree programs to be streamlined for transfer.

        Review of catalogs from regional community colleges to identify new courses and changes in course offerings. Academic department faculty are asked to review the identified courses to determine if there is an appropriate equivalent course at CSC. If equivalent courses are identified they are added to the guides and the Registrar’s Office is notified of the changes so that SIS can be updates as well.

        Review of new CSC catalogs to identify new courses and course changes so these can be updated in the online transfer guide and on SIS

        Transfer student policies meetings were initiated in the fall of 2005 to inventory transfer processes and to identify those that may cause difficulties for the students. The policy group has worked on several issues this year and will continue to meet to identify additional areas for improvement.

        The webmaster was asked to provide a review of the online transfer guide site and he proved information to improve the site content and navigation as well as the site organization. In addition, he provided feedback about ADA compliance as it related to the site. This information is being used to improve the site.

 

3.      Does your unit have any specific initiatives relating to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

The AVPEM Office has developed a packet of posters to send to regional and high growth community colleges to encourage students to consider the transfer opportunities at Chadron State College with an initial visit to the transfer student site www.csc.edu/transfer. This effort supports LR 174 and other initiatives to partner with community colleges to encourage student to pursue opportunities in higher education.

 

TRIO Program

 1. What planning process does your unit use in response to future needs? Describe your planning process and how it impacts the way the budget is allocated to support initiatives. How is your planning connected to Vision 2011?

 

The planning process for Project Strive/TRIO depends heavily on the sections included in the 2005-09 Student Support Services grant application submitted to the U.S. Department of Education in the Fall of 2004. Sections of that grant pertinent to the planning process include the following: 1) Objectives; 2) Evaluation; 3) Plan of Operation; and 4) Budget. In addition to the grant, any planning activities must take into consideration the requirements set forth in the Government Procedures and Results Act (GPRA) and the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR). These items dictate, to a degree, the operation of all Student Support Services units funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

 

Planning for the operation of the Project Strive/TRIO program takes place year-round. The Program Objectives are reviewed and used to identify services to be provided for students in the program. Procedures are developed and implemented in support of the program objective through the provision of services to the participant. An Evaluation or event summary of each activity is created which includes a section for ideas about if the activity should be continued and, if so, how it can be improved upon, and if it helps achieve the program objective. These are reviewed by the Project Strive Director and either the Student Intervention Coordinator or Counselor prior to being filed. The evaluation information includes data that is useful for addressing the effectiveness of any of the other two components (project objective, procedures). This feedback may indicate the need for additions, eliminations or changes in any of the other components.

 

The budget figures predominately into the planning process. Funds are provided each year by the U.S. Department of Education for operation of the program. The 2005/06 budget for the operation of Project Strive/TRIO is $235,689 including $15,230 for indirect costs (which is not available to Project Strive at this time) and $30,085 for Supplemental Grant Aid which must be used for student aid. This leaves $190,374 for program operations of which $162,602 (85%) is used for personnel costs. Personnel costs (salaries and benefits) are dependent upon negotiations between the College /Nebraska State College Board and the various bargaining units. The remaining $27,772 (15%) is used for travel, supplies, office operation, program and technology support. Allocations of the budget in these areas is dependent upon past practice and the amount of support, and program initiatives suggested by staff or other College officials.

 

The Project Strive/TRIO planning process is mindful of the CSC mission statement and eight Areas of Focus outlined in Vision 2011. A number of the activities undertaken by Project Strive/TRIO help the College achieve, in part, many of the objectives outlined under each Area. Objectives to which the planning process address substantially and on an annual basis include:

 

1.3.7 Objective: Student Recruitment and Retention

Prioritize student recruitment and retention.

 

1.3.8 Objective: Under-represented Populations

Recruit and retain underrepresented populations.

 

1.7.5 Objective: Technology and Equipment

Provide current teaching- and learning-related technology and equipment.

 

1.8.8 Objective: Student Advising and Career Services

Provide students individualized personal advising, career advising, and guidance.

 2. Describe how your unit assesses the success of plans and initiatives. How has this assessment process and resulting data improved the functioning of your unit? Are the results of your assessment shared with regional constituents or other campus units? If so, how and with whom? How is assessment data stored and assessed?

 

Assessment of Project Strive/TRIO plans and activities is performed in a number of ways. Formative evaluations (process) are conducted through the weekly meetings with Strive staff who are available to discuss current activities involving Project Strive students. Additional formative evaluations come in the form of input from students and college personnel involved in Project Strive services and activities. Summative evaluations (outcome) are conducted at the end of the program year and are evidenced in how well the program fulfills the project objectives as recorded on the Annual Performance Report required each year by the U.S. Department of Education.

Project Strive/TRIO examines both process and outcome by collecting and utilizing data that is both quantitative and qualitative in nature. Quantitative data consists of project statistics that clearly track the progress of the project in achieving its objectives. This data is provided in the form of numbers, percentages and ratios. Qualitative data is that which examines the “why” and “how” behind the progress of a project. This information reflects opinions, attitudes, philosophies and beliefs. Qualitative data is gathered from evaluation tools such as End of Year Interviews, Success Seminar evaluations, Student Advisory Board input and staff observations. Quantitative and qualitative data is gathered to measure the strength of the link between the project objectives and the progress being made toward their achievement. Quantifiable measures such as GPA, retention and graduation rates is combined with the results of interviews and questionnaires provided to program participants to measure progress towards meeting project goals. This process also helps identify specific programmatic changes that can be made to improve performance of the Project Strive/TRIO program.

 

Examples of the type of data used in the formative and summative evaluations appear in the following table:

 


Qualitative and Quantitative Measures

Formative Evaluation

Summative Evaluation

*  Participant eligibility criteria (Quantitative)

*  Participant ethnicity, gender, educational status (Quantitative)

*  Results of needs assessments (Quantitative)

*  Type of services provided to each participant (Quantitative)

*  Number of sessions attended (Quantitative)

*  Mentoring activities conducted, number of contact hours with each participant (Quantitative)

*  Number of mentors, number of participants assigned to each (Quantitative)

*  Types of workshops attended and participant attendance (Quantitative)

*  Services provided to each participant, type of service, amount of time for each service, number of times for each service (Quantitative)

*  Log of presentations and media releases about SSS program (Quantitative)

*  Faculty, staff, mentor reports (Qualitative)

*  Percentage of participant satisfaction with individual programs (Qualitative)

 

*  Total number identified and selected for SSS (Quantitative)

*  Total number and % of low-income, first generation and disabled participants by grade level (Quantitative)

*  Total number of needs assessments conducted (Quantitative)

*  Total number and time for each type of counseling session conducted (Quantitative)

*  Total number of mentors, number of participants being mentored, number and type of activities shared by mentors and participants (Quantitative)

*  Percentage of participants who received supplemental grant aid (Quantitative)

*  Percentage of participants who received technology and financial assistance (PDA, Textbook Loan, Reference Material, etc.) (Quantitative)

*  Percentage of participants who attained at least a 3.00 GPA (Quantitative)

*  Percentage of cohorts who were retained in the project (Quantitative)

*  Total number of cohorts who graduated from college (Quantitative)

*  Percentage of participants who apply for admission to professional/graduate programs and the percentage of those accepted (Quantitative)

*  Percentage of participants who enrolled in professional/graduate programs (Quantitative)

*  Percentage of cohorts who graduated within six years of matriculation (Quantitative)

*  Percentage of participant satisfaction with services (Qualitative)

*  End of year Counselor surveys (Qualitative)

 

 

Ongoing data collection is a significant part of the evaluation process. An electronic database (StudentAccess) is a commercial product that collects a wide range of data on the demographic, historical and current status of each Project Strive participant. The information contained in StudentAccess is extensive and is used for generating reports that measure Project Strive’s effectiveness in meeting the objectives of the grant. Data is collected at key points of the year in order to measure individual and cohort progress, and provide a measure for comparative purposes. As project activities are implemented, measures are taken to provide input for the formative evaluation. Data is also collected at the end of the year to again measure progress and provide input for the summative evaluation.

Data relevant to each program objective is used to report progress towards accomplishment of the objective. Reports and outcomes of each semester’s progress with regards to retention rates and GPA is available at the end of each program year. The APR for the program years included in the 2005-09 grant requires that reports on six-year graduation rates be available (following each six-year graduation period). In addition, the 2005-09 grant requires reports detailing enrollment in professional/graduate school.

 

Assessment results are shared with the U.S. Department of Education annually via the Annual Performance Report (APR) which is required of all TRIO/Student Support Services grant recipients. Demographic information about each program participant is forwarded electronically to the Department. In addition, the APR requests that Project Strive report on progress toward meeting its five program objectives.

 

Information from the formative evaluations is shared periodically with the TRIO/Student Support Services program at West Nebraska Community College (WNCC) in Scottsbluff. Project Strive/TRIO staff meet twice a year with their counterparts from WNCC to discuss issues, problems and solutions relating to the operation of a TRIO/Student Support Services program. Information shared is in the aggregate to protect the privacy of individual students.

 

Assessment data is stored on the Project Strive/TRIO’s t-drive which can be accessed by any of the program staff. Information on this drive is backed up every other week. The quantitative data stored in the StudentAccess program is also backed up every other week. Individual staff members may keep selected data on their personal computers located in their office. Additional quantitative data is stored in the College’s mainframe system (SIS PLUS) which is backed up daily.

 

 3. Does your unit have any specific initiatives related to regional demographics, economic development or regional needs?

 

No.