Criterion Five

 

Applied Sciences

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

Family and Consumer Sciences program formed a Focus Group/Advisory Board over ten years ago.  It was formed by the faculty in the program for the purpose of providing current feedback for the preparation of students for the workforce and professional development with career options.   The Family and Consumer Sciences program along with AG, ITE began a Mentor-Mentoree project in 2005 for freshman and senior students.  This project also serves as an opportunity to gain valuable information from current students regarding ideas and support for program changes.

 

High school teachers, parents, alumni, students, professionals in higher education and business and industry, community leaders, faculty, and a representative from workforce development serve on the Focus group.

 

The group normally meets annually to review current program offerings and suggest changes or ideas about catalog changes as well as program changes.

 

Useful suggestions provided from the Focus group are:

-         Focus on prevention and wellness

-         Identifying marketing strategies for the FCS program at CSC

-         Support for ideas for student internships and career placement

-         Information on what high schools are teaching

-         Ideas and feedback on program options at CSC and future directions

-         Information from alumni on the quality and preparation for career paths in business, industry, family and education

 

The Agriculture/Range Management unit does not have an official advisory board. 

 

The ITE program does not presently have an advisory board.

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

The FCS group has an advisory group as outlined in Criteria 5, Question one.

 

Though the Agriculture/Range Management unit does not have an “official” advisory board the faculty are very involved within the agricultural community.  The faculty have numerous students from the ranching community that give continuous feedback as to what is needed in the community.  The faculty are also very active in local agricultural based meetings and are often called on to contribute to these meetings.  Local media outlets also provide valuable information on agricultural issues that the faculty utilize in their classes.  The Agriculture Seminar class also serves a good venue for receiving student-based information on agricultural/range issues.

 

The ITE faculty communicate regularly with area industries to determine changing needs in industrial management. Area IT instructors are communicated with through personal contacts and college involvement in regional and state IT education organizations.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

FCS collaboratively partners with community colleges in the area specifically West Nebraska Community College (WNCC), Casper College, Mid Plains and McCook to create articulation agreements for transfer students.  The Early Childhood Education component has articulation agreements with all community colleges in Nebraska, and is in the beginning stages of establishing the same with all four-year colleges and universities in Nebraska.

 

FCS collaboration efforts also exist with public schools to promote transition from high school into college arena.  To facilitate this they have designed marketing tools and templates for easy access to information about the Family & Consumer Sciences program options.  The faculty communicate with Admissions staff for effectively presenting the options in the program.

 

Redesign of the web page and technology supports will allow students to have easy access to program information.  Development of a Mentor-Mentoree program for incoming freshman and seniors in all Applied Sciences programs to retain students.  FCS has also shared information about FCS programs with other departments across the CSC campus especially with Psychology, HPER, Education, Special Education, and Science.

 

FCS also collaborates with Chadron Community Hospital, private business, Head Start and Early Head Start, Early Development Network, public schools, and Pine Ridge Job Corp on internships and placements of students for work and career placement.

 

The CSC Agriculture/Range Management faculty hosted the National Pre-Veterinary Conference in 2005, the first time a conference of this level has ever been hosted at an institution that does not have a full Veterinary Medicine Program.  The program has also hosted Nebraska Game and Parks Legacy programs; Returning to the Farm, Drought Mitigation, and the Range Short Course programs with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln; State Range Judging and Envirothon contests; Western Nebraska Carbon Sequestration Conference; annual Artificial Insemination and Wildland Fire Fighting schools; and aided in the development of the Panhandle Prescribed Fire Taskforce.

 

ITE field trips for students to interact with area industries are conducted on a regular basis.  Internships with area industries and businesses are set up for interested students.  Workshops for area IT instructors are held on campus.  Presentations by ITE faculty are given at regional and state education conferences on topics related to IT, especially in the area of alternative energy.

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

Specific partnerships have been developed between West Nebraska Community College (WNCC is a 2 year community college) and the Chadron State College (4 year college) Family and Consumer Sciences program.  Faculty meet at least two times a year on alternating campuses to discuss and review course offerings.   Faculty and staff have developed articulation agreements for the majority of courses offered in the child development option for transfer into the CSC program.  Additional conversations support the placement of practicum students, interns and job related placements of students in the Scottsbluff and Gering areas, the home campus area of WNCC.  Faculty and staff have created a partnership to not only coordinate program offerings but to also work to deliver courses via on-line, ITV, Directed Independent study or face-to-face alternatives.  Advising and support to the student for advising is also a collaborative partnership.

 

The Agriculture/Range Management program has a very strong partnership with the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission through three bighorn sheep research projects.  They also have a partnership with Nebraska Game and Parks and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on a cheatgrass control research project.  The program is also partnered with the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on a cavity nesting bird study.  The last two years has seen a joint project with the Natural Resource Conservation Service using range faculty and students to conduct the rangeland portion of the National Resource Inventory.  Personnel from each of these agencies regularly serve as guest lecturers in classes.  Area producers often provide field learning opportunities to students at the college.

 

ITE partnerships are established with area businesses and industries providing consultation on plant and assembly line design and safety requirements.

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

Tracking of alumni to better market the program and gain feedback for future course and program offerings.  Support for a wellness program for the program, college and community.  Ideas were solicited from a face-to-face gathering in addition to telephone and email conversations with the Focus group and alumni.

 

Through works with wildlife biologists with the U.S. Forest Service and Nebraska Game and Parks Commission and the Biology department we have implemented a Wildlife Management Minor with a strong rangeland wildlife focus.  The Agriculture/Range Management faculty have also picked up teaching of a Mammalogy class from the Biology department to complete the minor.  The faculty in the program remain in contact with students that have been successfully placed in ranching positions, and in government positions with the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Natural Resource Conservation Service, and Nebraska Game and Parks as to improvements that could be made to the program curriculum.  Dr. Georgia Younglove has also served as the National Pre-Veterinary student advisor for the last two years, and Dr. Chuck Butterfield has served as International Student Conclave advisor for the Society for Range Management for the last five years.  Both of these positions put the faculty in contact with individuals from private industry, federal and state governments, other professors in the field, and producers on an international level.  This leads to the sharing of information and the strengthening of the CSC Agriculture/Range program.

 

IT upgraded and selected alternative software in computer aided drafting and design courses based on recommendations by area industries and educators.  Upgraded and improved programmable logic control courses based on recommendations by industrial representatives.  Initiated alternative energy curricula based on recommendations by industrial and educational representatives.

 

Business & Economics

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

Yes.

 

§         Department developed an Advisory Board policy and procedures handbook

                     Business/industry leaders from the broader service region were identified

                 Formal invitations were sent to identified leaders

                 First organizational Advisory Board meeting took place August 2005.

                 Initial 10-member Board represented the following business fields:

                  Finance/Investment, Health Care, Retail, Railroad, Forest Service

                 Initial 10-member Board resides in the following demographic areas:

                  Colorado, Nebraska, South Dakota

                 Advisory Board meetings are stated in the handbook as twice annually.  However, Advisory Board members chose to meet bi-monthly, if possible, during the regular academic year. 

                 Advisory Board has met either on-campus or teleconference six times during academic year 2005-2006.

                 Board’s primary goal of academic year 2006 has been to acquaint themselves with departmental/academic programs and gather data concerning campus internships, admission/retention and placement.

                 An effort is being made to expand the number of Board members and regional businesses and demographic areas represented.

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

            Not applicable.  We do have an external advisory board.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

                 2001-2004, the Nebraska Business Development Center (NBDC), a subunit of the Department of Business and Economics, served small businesses within our regional area.

                 Tax update workshops

                 Workshops to health care providers

                 Partnership Home Town Competitiveness (HTC)

                 Valentine Economic Development Survey Project.

                 Presentation on "Professionalism Under Pressure" to Panhandle Partnership for Health and Human Services

                 Presentation on "Customer Service" to Chadron Community Hospital

                 Presentation on "Identity Theft" to all staff at Job Corps

                 Presentation on "Strategies for Success" to Job Corps Women in Transition

                 Presentation on "Motivation for Work & Life" to Western Nebraska Community Health Network Annual Training

                 Presentation on "Success & Leadership" for Business & Professional Women

                 Presentation on "Distance Learning" to PEO Chapter BL

     Presentation on "Value-Added Ag Through Cluster Concepts"

     Western Nebraska Community Network

     SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) has its own external constituents.

a.   Program for Pine Ridge Job Corps, Chadron, Nebraska—SIFE college students give monthly help to students at Job Corps regarding interviewing, skills, and resumes.

b.   SIFE touches elementary, high school and community levels.  For example, at Pine Ridge High School, South Dakota, which is on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the high school students are taught about banking, getting an apartment, insurance, and car dealers, etc., because these things do not exist on the reservation.

c.   SIFE has its own Business Advisory Board.

                 Center for Economic Education

a.   Annually hosts and coordinates World Food Day Teleconference

b.   Each semester provides 4-6 Stock Market Game Workshops

c.   Serves as coordinator and advisor of Stock Market Game Players, approximately 300 annually

                 Mentors for Stock Market Game with teachers in our service region

                 Offer class every summer with primary target group being teachers in our service region with specific course topics varying such as Entrepreneurship, Personal Finance, Global Trade, Economic Geography and Economic and Community Development

                 Grant funding from Nebraska Council on Economic Education to support Center and grant funding from National Council Economic Education in cooperation with other Centers in Nebraska for economic education

                 Workshops for teachers and block students in social sciences and economic education

                 Coordinates with teachers in our service region the development and implementation of economic and related curriculum

                 Board of Directors of Nebraska Council serves as an Advisory Board for our Business Development Center

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

a.       Partnership with Home Town Competitiveness

b.      Reestablishment of Nebraska Business Development Center

c.       College/community collaboration on activation of 501C3 (an IRS tax designation for non-profit agencies).

d.      Worked with the Information Technology Instructor at WNCC to identify a text book and methods for teaching Systems Analysis and Design as well as COBOL Programming to assist in the transition to Chadron State from WNCC

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

·                     Economic Development Survey – Valentine, NE

·                     Economic Impact Study – Alliance, NE

 

 

Communication Arts

 

1. Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.
 

No

 

2. If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

Communication and PR have little contact with external constituents presently.  Faculty in Journalism maintains contact with newspaper editors in the region and also with alumni.  Mrs. Dickenson hosts a site where former CSC Journalism students can post messages and contact her.  

 

 

  1. Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents.

 

Students in Public Relations courses during the 2005-2006 academic year participated in projects put forth by community and campus bodies.  These included

·        Designing and developing promotional materials for the Nebraska Museum Association. 

·        Presenting class projects to students in two area high schools using videoteleconferencing to engage the high school students in those projects.

·        Created and implemented promotional ideas to increase attendance at basketball games.

·        Designed and conducted parent surveys for the Boys & Girls Club of America.

·        Designed and developed brochures for the Rodeo Club fundraiser involving the sale of prints by Mr. Donald Ruleaux.

·        Working with the Chamber of Commerce to sell ads and prepare the display of ads at the Chadron airport.

·        Designed brochures for Applied Sciences.

·        Created and presented ideas for CSC’s Cooperating Schools Scholarship

·        Produced public service instructional video for Pine Ridge Indian Health Services.

·        Designed and developed brochures for the CSC Galaxy Series.

 

Several of these projects were presented at the Central States Communication Association conference in Indianapolis, Indiana in April, 2006.

 

  1. Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

            Pine Ridge Video

            Nebraska Museum

            Boys & Girls Club

 

  1. Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

Professional organization guidelines were used to develop the new Communication Arts comprehensive major with options in Communication, Public Relations and Journalism.  Faculty members consulted documents posted on the Public Relations Society of America website and in particular their guidelines for education in the 21st century.  The National Communication Association guidelines for program development were also accessed through the web.  These two organizations provided a majority of the framework for the new major.  For Journalism, The Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication was consulted for guidelines for programs.  AEJMC and NCA along with local and regional associations provide information on assessment as well that can be used as we further refine our program. 

 

Counseling, Psychology & Social Work

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

The graduate Counseling program does not have an external advisory board.

 

The Psychology program does not have an external advisory board.

 

The Social Work Program has developed guidelines for the functions of the external Advisory Boards including:

 

·        Review of Applications for Admission to the Social Work Program

·        Gatekeeping

·        Recommendations to the Field Instruction Faculty

 

Exchanges with social work practitioners

 

The Social Work Program has ongoing exchanges with community professionals. These exchanges occur through the program/field advisory committees, group and individual meetings, Field Instructor and Task Supervisor meetings and public speaking opportunities.

 

Program/Advisory Committee:  Over the last several years the Social Work Program has maintained a Program Advisory Committee. Between 2002 and 2004, the Advisory Committee did not formally retain an active role in the Social Work Program.  However, during the period from 2002-2004, individual members of the past Advisory Committee did take an active role in meetings with the School and College administration to advocate on behalf of social work students and the social work program. In addition, several community members contacted members of the Board of Trustees to affirm the need for a social work program.  In the Fall 2004, the Field Coordinator developed a Field Advisory Committee that reviewed the proposed curricular changes in the social work program and provided feedback to the program.  During the Spring 2005, the Social Work faculty decided to take the Advisory Committee in a new direction that would essentially combine the Program Advisory Committee and the Field Advisory Committee into a single Program/Field Advisory group.  Furthermore, the social work program decided to rewrite the objectives of the advisory group in order to provide the committee members with greater opportunities to participate in the ongoing development, assessment, and promotion of the social work program within the region. The revised Advisory Committee began meeting in the Spring 2006. The Board has bylaws in the form of an “Organizational Understanding” for the Social Work Program Advisory Committee approved in Spring 2006.

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

·        The graduate Counseling program wants to set up an external advisory board and will do so in the future. This is a requirement of CACREP a national Counseling accreditation group that the Counseling program wishes to secure.

·        The Counseling program is interested in hearing and incorporating feedback from external constituents. Counseling faculty visit Western Nebraska Community College (WNCC) and Mid-Plains Community College (MPCC) to advise students and conduct the graduate student interviews. The interview is a requirement for acceptance into the graduate counseling program. At this meeting, potential graduate students complete the pre-counseling assessment form and are involved in other counseling program discussions.

·        The Counseling faculty intend to survey potential graduate students and students who have graduated from the Counseling program for follow-up information about program improvement.

 

·        There are several ways in which the Psychology program has interacted with external constituents. Department members often visit WNCC and other associated campuses to monitor needs of students. Classes are offered online and via interactive television to many of these places. In addition, the department intends to monitor graduates for graduate school admission and job placement, although this is still in the early stages.

 

·         The Social Work Advisory Board meets no less than once per semester. Meetings with Field Instructors and Task Supervisors are conducted both face-to-face and by interactive television. Other external constituents are contacted by e-mail, face-to-face through participation by the Social Work Program Faculty on advisory boards and in collaborative organizations. Results of the longitudinal study, curriculum changes, program changes have been shared in writing by mail and e-mail and by telephone discussion.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

·        The faculty visit community colleges (WNCC & MPCC) and other campuses (Casper College) to meet with potential students, current students and faculty at other institutions.

·        Members of the department present papers at, and are involved in regional and national conferences, and are able to attend sessions related to program assessment and best practices in education.

·        The Counseling program organized the Chi Sigma Iota chapter on campus.

·        The Psychology program is attempting to begin a Psi Chi chapter on campus.

·        The Social Work program has exchanges with the following:

o       Professional Associations

§         National Association of Social Workers (NASW) membership

§         Panhandle Partnership:  a collaboration of 50 agencies in the region with the goal of enhancing services, obtaining grants, and service coordination.

§         Family Rescue Services – Domestic Violence

o       Community at Large

§         Meetings with local business persons

§         Discussions with specific individuals regarding needs.

§         Discussions with Native American students.

§         Meetings with Chamber of Commerce and Civic Groups

§         Radio show appearances

§         Children’s Festival Activities

§         Donation drive with Social Work Club on behalf of Family Rescue services

o       Advocacy Groups

In the Spring 2005, social work faculty and students attending NASW Lobby Day arranged visits with advocacy organizations, the Nebraska Human Rights Committee, Nebraska Advocacy Services and the Lincoln Action Program.

Dr. Wes Stevens has served as Secretary of the Faculty Union for CSC.

Faculty has been involved with Disability Accommodations on behalf of students: Deaf and Physical Disabilities and student activists via sponsorship, etc.

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

·        The Counseling faculty teaches students in off-campus sites (North Platte, Sidney, Alliance, and Scottsbluff, Nebraska) and conduct Internship classes in North Platte and Scottsbluff, NE.

·        The Psychology program has not been involved in any partnerships in the past five years.

·        The Social Work program has the following partnerships:

o       The Social Work Faculty has been active with the Nebraska Consortium for Social Work Education. The current focus of the group is the development and implementation of a plan that will provide stipend funding for Social Work students planning to enter the Child Welfare area of practice. The Social Work schools in Nebraska are developing a partnership with Health and Human Services to increase the number of trained Social Work educated professionals in the state.

o       The CSC Social Work Program has become one of participating partners in the Panhandle Partnership, a collaborative effort by more than 50 agencies in the Western Panhandle of Nebraska. The Partnership has successfully written for and received large grants to assist in funding human service initiatives in the Region and engaged in service coordination planning..

o       Chadron State College has developed matriculation agreements with Community Colleges in the Region. Social Work Faculty members and CSC Distance Education staff have been actively engaged in collaborations and meetings with Western Nebraska Community College to facilitate student access to Social Work Education by Interactive Television (ITV) and hybrid forms of distance education. 

o       Chadron State College entered into a partnership with Florida State University (FSU) College of Social Work in Fall 2004 to extend the online MSW Program offered by Florida State University to the High Plains Region of Nebraska, South Dakota, Wyoming, and Colorado.  CSC was invited to participate in the Fund for the Improvement of Post Secondary Education (FIPSE) Grant by FSU due to the frontier nature of the College’s location. The Social Work Program at CSC is the only Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Program within 300 miles.

o       The U.S. Department of Education’s Fund for the Improvement of Post Secondary Education (FIPSE) awarded the FSU College of Social Work $500,000 to open up its nationally renowned program to people living in areas of the country where social workers are desperately needed. The College of Social Work at FSU has the only CSWE accredited online Master’s degree program of this kind in the country. CSC was invited to participate in the FIPSE Grant by FSU due to the frontier nature of the College’s location. The Social Work Program at CSC is the only BSW Program within 300 miles.  Many BSW graduates living in this Region expressed a desire for further education, and the need was evident for advancement of educational opportunities to working professionals who were “place bound”  by family and professional obligations. 

o       Florida State University (FSU) was developing partnerships with Colleges and University systems in the Northern Midwest to accommodate individuals who could not uproot their lives to relocate in the vicinity of a MSW Program to earn a degree. Working with FSU, Chadron State College Social Work Program has been able to enroll five Masters Candidates for Fall of 2005. A member of CSC Social Work Faculty serves as the Field Liaison for that program, working with students from Rapid City, SD, Cody, WY and Scottsbluff, NE. In addition, CSC Social Work Faculty is engaged in student recruitment and identification of Field Practicum sites.

o       According to the Director of Distance Learning and Part-Time Programs for the FSU College of Social Work, Janet Berry, planning is going smoothly. “The educators we have been working with in all three States have been incredibly helpful and receptive to what we are trying to accomplish. These partnerships will benefit everyone involved; the Universities, the students, and the communities.”

o       Educators anticipate students from a variety of different backgrounds enrolling. “It is part of our mission to educate people committed to community outreach and diversity, in areas ranging from healthcare practices and child welfare to counseling the elderly”, said Aaron McNeece, Ph.D., Dean of the FSU College of Social Work.

 

(Excerpts from FIPSE Press Release, Fall 2004)

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

·        For Counseling there is no external advisory board or coordinated effort to collect information from external constituents at this time. Counseling faculty members have interacted with Counseling students and Counseling faculty at other institutions outside the college and have used this knowledge for the program.

 

·        Although there is not an external advisory board or a coordinated effort to collect information from external constituents at this time for the Psychology program, faculty members have been proactive in interacting with people outside the college and collecting information from pertinent sources to improve the program. Some particular sources of note are the American Psychological Association, which provides useful information for assessment and program evaluation, as well as the Society for Teaching of Psychology, and the Association for Psychological Science (formerly the American Psychological Society). In addition, the psychology program has attempted to begin a chapter of Psi Chi on campus, and has explored changes in course requirements that would be necessary for this process, particularly the research methods and statistics requirements.

·        http://www.psychologicalscience.org/apssc/ Association for Psychological Science

·        http://www.apa.org/ed/guidehomepage.html Assessment Cyberguide from APA

·        http://teachpsych.lemoyne.edu/ Society for the Teaching of Psychology

 

 

·         In the Fall of 2004, the Social Work Program requested previous Field Instructors and Agency Directors assemble to serve as an ad hoc Advisory Committee. The objective of the meeting was to gain the input and perspective of community members with a history of involvement with the program. Those in attendance were interested in the changes in curriculum and sequencing of courses being developed for Academic Review. Members of the group expressed positive opinions of the changes being proposed and the work towards horizontal and vertical integration of key concepts. The group reviewed a draft of the curriculum changes, Student Handbook and offered input regarding the Field Practicum Manual and the Field evaluation process.  The Ad hoc Advisory Committee discussed the need to integrate the Field Evaluation and the Learning Contract for Field Students. They also offered input re: the Gatekeeping process and how an Advisory Group might handle early terminations of students from Field Placements when a problematic situation arose. There was some agreement as to the lack of clarity on that issue having caused confusion in past years. The solutions suggested varied, but the sense most had was the student needed closer guidance re: Field Agency and choice of placement. Committee members indicated “gatekeeping” in a more general sense was needed from students, faculty and agencies so students for whom Social Work was not a good match a decision would be made earlier to pursue other majors. The Advisory Committee also believed students and Field Instructors would benefit by more specificity in how to address concerns through a Gatekeeping process.

 

·         These suggestions were taken into account as the new Field Manual and Social Work Student Handbook were written. A clear set of criteria for matching students with an agency placement was developed according to the CSWE criteria were integrated into the Field Manual. The Gatekeeping process was delineated in the Student Handbook. Four pre-professional courses were added at the 200 level prior to admission to the Professional Social Work Program.

 

·         In April 2006 the Council on Social Work Education Site Visit was conducted on the CSC campus. The Site Visitors reviewed the Study which contained all course syllabi, the Field Manual, the Student Handbook, Assessment Reports and implementations of findings from assessments. They met with Field Instructors and Task Supervisors with the Field Education Program and Web the Social Work Advisory Board. Their preliminary feedback to the Program at their exit interview included a suggestion that Human Behavior in the Social Environment be returned to two (3) three credit courses. In addition, as a result of their feedback to Social Work Program secured permission from Academic Review to specify Econ 130 Survey of Economics as a general studies requirement for Social Work students. The final report from the Council on Social Were Education will be received in October 2006 with any additional revisions being addressed after receipt of that document.

 

Education

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

The Education Unit has signed document acknowledging the Western Nebraska Administrators Association as the unit’s informal advisory body.  This organization meets monthly with the Unit Head (Chair) participating in these meetings and with a place on the meeting agenda.  The board was developed at the request of the Education Unit in an attempt to receive regular feedback.  Providing feedback is not a problem with this group and has resulted in the following programmatic changes within the Education Unit:

• Middle Grades Endorsement program going totally on-line (with Math and SPED content specialization areas);

• New MS Education degree option of Curriculum Supervisor, resulting in a Master’s Degree and a Curriculum Supervisor’s Administrative Endorsement (K-12): Director of Special Education;

• Mild to Moderate (SPED) Endorsement program (K-12) going totally on-line,

• Improved recruitment strategies that the unit is implementing (i.e., co-sponsoring High School Future Teachers Associations within area schools);

• Native American Welcome Day: inviting Native American High School students for a CSC visit.  (Held each semester)

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

In addition to the items identified in question 1 above, our unit faculty are regularly in area schools conducting supervision visitations for our Teacher Interns (Student Teachers), thereby maintaining a window to the changing needs of constituents and communities within our region.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

• Co-sponsor the Western Nebraska Excellence in Education Conference each October with the Nebraska Department of Education (NDE).

• Co-sponsor the Native American Symposium each September with the Western Nebraska Native American Advisory Council to the NDE.

• Developed an “Inclusionary Practices” workshop (SPED) that faculty have been asked to present at five different one-day school in-service day meetings.

• Partnerships with the Dawes, Sheridan and Sioux County Rural School Superintendents to host the Rural Schools Science Fair each year.

• Partner with the District 12 Agriculture Teachers Association to host the District 12 Annual FFA Leadership Conference for High School vocational agriculture students.

• Native American Welcome Day, a collaborative activity with area high schools in an effort to demystify the college experience, and to show that a college career is a possibility.

• Host the Region 1 Special Olympics competition each April

• Partnering with IVY Technical College in Indianapolis, IN to deliver online course programming in Math (7-12), SPED (K-12) and Mid-Grade Education (4-9) endorsement areas.

• Partnered with ESU #16 on a Math Partnership Grant, for improving the Math instruction, funded for the 2004-05 academic year.

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

• Western Nebraska School Administrators Association (described above in Question 1)

• Co-sponsor the Western Nebraska Excellence in Education Conference each October with the NDE.

• Co-sponsor the Native American Symposium each September with the Western Nebraska Native American Advisory Council to the NDE.

• Partnerships with the Dawes, Sheridan and Sioux County Rural School Superintendents to host the Rural Schools Science Fair each year.

• Partner with the District 12 Agriculture Teachers Association to host the District 12 Annual FFA Leadership Conference for High School vocational agriculture students.

• Partnering with IVY Technical College in Indianapolis, IN to deliver online course programming in Math (7-12), SPED (K-12) and Mid-Grade Education (4-9) endorsement areas.

• Partnered with ESU #16 on a Math Partnership Grant, for improving the Math instruction, funded for the 2004-05 academic year.

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

• Middle Grades Endorsement program going totally on-line (with Math and SPED content specialization areas)—from advisory board

• New MS Education degree option of Curriculum Supervisor, resulting in a Master’s Degree and a Curriculum Supervisor’s Administrative Endorsement (K-12): Director of Special Education -- from meeting with school administrator participants at the Nebraska Council on Teacher Education (NCTE) meeting.

• Mild to Moderate (SPED) Endorsement program (K-12) going totally on-line -- from past graduates wishing to add this endorsement program.

• Improved recruitment strategies that the unit is implementing (i.e., co-sponsoring HS Future Teachers Associations within area schools) -- from advisory board.

• Native American Welcome Day: inviting Native American High School students for a CSC visit.  (Held each semester) -- derived from faculty member observing a similar program in South Dakota.

 

English & Humanities

 

1. Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

English

 

None

 

Spanish (please note that the Spanish major and endorsement will no longer be offered effective fall 2006.)

 

            None

 

2. If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

English

 

Conferring with community college colleagues and secondary school teachers.  Also through maintaining alumni contacts.

 

Spanish

 

We no longer have a Spanish major and have hired a new faculty member to oversee our Spanish minor.  She plans to confer with community college colleagues (especially at WNCC) and alumni.

 

3.  Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents.

 

English

 

·        Two of the English faculty members have done service-learning projects in Composition courses; one was related to regional WWII veterans that resulted in a traveling exhibition (around the region and to Washington D.C., where it was exhibited in the U.S. Senate building), and the other resulted in a student written book published on the history of Chadron.

·        The poetry professor does numerous poetry readings around the region and the state.

·        One of the program’s composition professors regularly performs at story telling festivals through out the high plains region; most of her poetry and stories are about the experiences of pioneer women on the high plains

 

Spanish

 

The former director of the Spanish program served as an interpreter for the Dawes County judicial system.

 

4.  Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

English

 

Two of the English faculty serve on the board of the Mari Sandoz Society and help organize the annual Mari Sandoz conference.  One faculty member serves as director of the Nebraska Book Festival.  The English education faculty member is actively involved in NCTE.  Another faculty member is president of a Victorian studies society and annually plans and attends their conferences.

 

Spanish

 

The former director established relationships with institutes in Oaxaca, Mexico and Madrid, Spain for the summer study abroad program.  She also started a Spanish honors chapter on campus.

 

5.  Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

English

 

The Mari Sandoz Society expressed interest in having us develop a literature course that specifically addresses Western writers and themes.  In response, the department now regularly offers a topics course ENG 431 Literature of the American West, which is part of the Nebraskaland writers project. 

 

Also, as already mentioned in response to 1.4, at the request of the author, one faculty member edited a manuscript on the topic of Cuny Table written by a descendent of the one of the original settlers of that region.  Additionally, two of the English faculty members have done service-learning projects in Composition courses; one was related to regional WWII veterans that resulted in a traveling exhibition (around the region and to Washington D.C., where it was exhibited in the U.S. Senate building), and the other resulted in a student written book published on the history of Chadron.   Both of these projects arose out of conversations with area residents and community leaders.

 

Spanish

 

None

 

Health, Physical Education & Recreation

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

No.

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

The HPER department is continually involved with current practitioners to determine future needs of students and society.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

Challenge Days, Jump Rope for Heart, Scholastic Day exams, Special Olympics, Outdoor Adventure days.

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

Challenge Days, Jump Rope for Heart, Scholastic Day exams, Special Olympics, Outdoor Adventure days.  Teamed with Nebraska on the Move to presents health components for Challenge days.

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

Implement additional activities and Health component to Challenge Days.  (Implemented 0607)

 

Justice Studies

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

The Justice Studies department does not currently have an external advisory board.  The department is considering establishing such a board as one of its assessment tools.

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

Contact with our regional constituents occurs in several ways.  First, the Internship & Career Services Office provides contact with regional employers, government offices and law enforcement agencies through the internship program.  Intern supervisors provide direct contact to the departmental internship coordinator.  Note that Legal Studies students are required to complete an internship while Criminal Justice students are strongly encouraged to do so.  The feedback provided by the supervisors and co-workers to the Internship & Career Services Office are communicated to the faculty members.  Second, faculty members routinely attend national and regional meetings that offer programming and continuing education to address each profession’s current issues and concerns.  Third, Justice Studies faculty regularly contact and visit with alumni, graduate students, community colleges and employers to maintain an awareness of changes in both the Criminal Justice and Legal Studies professions and to listen to the feedback each of these groups provides.  Fourth, faculty members regularly work in a consultant relationship with agencies in the criminal justice and legal field.  For example, one member serves on the Nebraska Police Standards Advisory Council.  Another serves as a consultant to the local County Attorney.  Still another has drafted no less than three sets of tests for hiring or promotion within a local law enforcement agency.  This type of contact and exposure provides feedback that informs curriculum, learning outcomes, and assessment of students.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

Reader: Please note that a complete answer to this question requires a review of the activity reports of all Justice Studies faculty members.  What follows is a recent sampling of activities.

 

March 15, 2006 – Domestic Violence Training Workshop (see #4 below).

 

On October 31 - November 2, 2005, the Justice Studies faculty, through Vision 2011 funding, organized a Forensic Sciences and Criminal Investigation Conference attended by Nebraska, Wyoming and South Dakota law enforcement agencies.

 

A faculty member serves on the Nebraska Police Standards Advisory Council and has been appointed a member of the Nebraska Crime Commission (2005-present).

 

2005-2006 - A faculty member is on the City of Chadron’s Police Policies and Procedures Committee to provide consultation regarding community law enforcement and legal issues.

 

2005 - A faculty member has written the Chadron Civil Service Commission law enforcement tests for the ranks of sergeant and lieutenant.

 

Law Day – Criminal Justice and Law Career Day for hundreds of regional high school students held on October 25, 2001, and October 9, 2003.  Representatives from numerous agencies cooperated to present to these students.

 

2004 - A faculty member coordinated the Norfolk Bank Homicides workshop for law enforcement and bank personnel (on campus October 5, 2004).

 

2004 - A faculty member coordinated the Law Enforcement Leadership Seminar conducted on campus (October 21, 2004)

 

2003 - A faculty member coordinated the WING Drug Task force Advisory Board meeting on campus (October 23, 2003).

 

2003 - A faculty member coordinated the Governor's Children's Task Force public hearing on campus (October 28, 2003).

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

Again, please note that a complete answer to this question requires a review of the activity reports of all Justice Studies faculty members.  What follows is a recent sampling of activities.

 

Note to reader: Please also refer to number 3 above.

 

On March 15. 2006, the Justice Studies faculty partnered with the Nebraska Attorney General’s Office and the City of Chadron to host a Domestic Violence Training Workshop for law enforcement, counselors, first responders, prosecutors, court personnel and students.

 

Legal Studies faculty partnered with High Plains Community Development to host a Fair Housing Workshop in April 13, 2004 and April 21, 2005.

 

Partnered with Nebraska Legal Services, Nebraska Health and Human Services and Chadron Youthbuild to present the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) 2004 workshop on April 27, 2004 to regional social workers, child welfare representatives, attorneys, and court service workers.

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

Note: For more information on suggestions and how Justice Studies obtains information from constituents, please refer to question 2 (Criterion Five) above.

 

Input from graduate law school students has resulted in an expanded focus on legal research and writing.  Students now enjoy more complete coverage of the topic in two classes, LS 238, Legal Research & Writing I, and LS 338, Legal Research & Writing II. 

 

Input from law enforcement agencies and employers regarding student preparation for interviewing and testing has been incorporated into CJ 434, Seminar:  Current Issues in Criminal Justice. 

 

Library Media Program

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

The Library Media Program does not have an external advisory board.

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

The Department communicates informally with members of the Panhandle Library System, a cooperative of school, college, public and special libraries in the Nebraska Panhandle. 

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

CSC librarians have given many workshops for area librarians including for the Panhandle Library System. Workshop topics have included ready reference, general reference, electronic reference, general web resources, copyright, plagiarism, digital imaging, collection development policies, library patron policies, challenged materials policies and internet usage policies.

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

a.       The Department partners with school, public, college and special libraries in throughout the Panhandle in the placement of practicum students in order to gain experience in actual library operation.

b.      The Department sponsors, on campus, the teleconferences from College of DuPage.  The presence of a CSC librarian at these teleconferences allows area librarians to attend at no cost and provides expanded opportunities for librarians to network.

c.       The Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board has reviewed the CSC LMS coursework and found that it met Wyoming library media program approval standards.

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

Librarians in the Panhandle were among the groups that encouraged the transition to online classes. This information was obtained through questions about the LMS program and through conversations with librarians.

 

Mathematical Sciences

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

No.

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

We meet with Community College faculty, Educational Administrators, and the UNL Applied Statistics Department faculty (where some of our graduates go for graduate school).  Meetings occur by visits or attending professional conferences.

 

We applied for and received funding from the Vision 2011 funds to develop and set in motion the Community College Collaboration and Recruitment Project in 2005-06.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

We meet with Community College faculty, are active participants in professional organization meetings, and work with the Nebraska Department of Education on teacher workshops.  We have had faculty who held offices in professional organizations (Nebraska Association of Teachers of Mathematics), etc.  Give them my resume, with 9 presentations in the last three years.  Those are national, regional, state, and local.  And Rob Stack has even more service, as president of NATM, conference presenter, etc.  Beth Wentworth works with the Nebraska Department of Education and Education Service Units on teacher workshops. 

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

Ivy Tech collaboration began in mathematics, transferred to Education Department, as it deals with secondary education in mathematics.  Ivy Tech is a collaborative agreement between the Education Unit – Math Endorsement Program, to deliver online education course programs to preservice students at IVY Technical College, Indianapolis, IN

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

While we don’t have an external advisory board, we follow the recommendations of our national professional organizations where appropriate.  I guess the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the Mathematics Association of America are external agencies, and we are current with their publications, position statements, Standards, etc.  We also offer a program that meets the criteria of Rule 24, published by NDE.  But we have followed guidelines and program recommendations, not waited until someone “suggested” something.  The entire Info Management Systems program was drastically revised in Spring 2006, not because someone told us to, but because the faculty were aware of the changing demands of the marketplace. 

 

Music

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

There is, at present, no external advisory board organized to assist our department in assessing needs peculiar to our service region. We do, however, attempt to incorporate the ideals and guidelines of nationally recognized professional organizations (Music Educators National Conference, National Association of Music Business Institutions, Music Teachers National Association, and American Choral Directors Association, to name a few) in our curriculum planning and program development. We are also in informal communication with other area music educators (mainly secondary-level public school teachers) about the specific needs of their programs.

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

This is primarily accomplished through contact with music educators and other area musicians throughout the CSC service region at conferences, festivals, and workshops. The faculty member that supervises our student teachers has frequent interaction with cooperating teachers at area public schools. Other individual faculty members also travel to area schools for clinics and adjudication. At least once during the past five years, we have published an alumni newsletter that has included a request for feedback. We also host a music alumni luncheon during the annual Nebraska Music Educators Association conference.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

a.       High Plains Band and Choir Festival: High school music students from throughout our service region are invited to audition for honor ensembles. Directors’ Clinics are also offered, and the CSC ensembles are featured in performances. The Festival and Honor ensembles give a final performance that is open to the community.

b.      High Plains Jazz Festival: High school music ensembles are invited to perform and receive juried evaluation. Clinics are also offered, and CSC ensembles perform for festival attendees.

c.       Bordeaux Community Band: This ensemble is sponsored by the college and directed by a member of the music faculty. Community members make up the majority of the performers.

d.      CSC Community Chorus: A similar ensemble to #3 above, but featuring choral music.

e.       Woodwind Day: A biennial event for area high school woodwind players and their teachers. Activities include lecture/demonstrations and recital performances.

f.        Piano Teachers Day Out: A biennial event providing professional development for independent piano teachers from throughout the CSC service area. Nationally recognized clinicians travel to CSC to present workshops hosted by the college.

g.       Scholastic Day Music Examination: An examination in music theory and history is given to interested high school students from throughout the CSC service region. All exams are scored and awards are given to top students.

h.       Performance tours by various CSC ensembles

i.         Musical entertainment at various political and social events

j.        Clinics with area high school bands and choirs

k.      Combined concerts with Chadron High School band

l.         Student internships at area businesses

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

Hosting Nebraska District VI high school music festival (2003, 2004) in partnership with NSAA

 

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

None

 

Physical & Life Sciences

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

No, we do not have an external advisory board for our standard programs.  We do have an advisory board for our health professions program – the Health Professions Advisory Group.  This group, which consists of CSC faculty, works with University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) and Creighton University program directors and faculty in the handling of our special RHOP (Rural Health Opportunities Program – CSC & UNMC) and HPHOP (High Plains Health Opportunities Program – CSC & Creighton) programs.  This cooperative team of individuals approves a curriculum and program eligibility standards which CSC students must fulfill to meet the entrance requirements for the specific professional programs.  These standards are reviewed annually and updated as necessary. 

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

As part of our freshman Careers in Science course, we tour employers in the field of physical science and in discussions with them learn what their expectations are for our graduates.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

The Physical and Life Science Department has conducted an annual event, Health Professions Day, to educate high school students as to the educational and career opportunities in the health professions.  We conduct regular planetarium shows and geology museum tours for local schools or groups.

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

CSC Health Professions Program continues to maintain special relationships with the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) and Creighton University with our RHOP and HPHOP programs.  These programs are thriving and will continue to be successful.  Also, faculty from our department joined with faculty from ESU 13 (the Secondary Education  Service Unit that oversees the activity of High Schools in the Scottsbluff Gering area of the Nebraska panhandle) to work on a grant project to develop an integrated physical and life science curriculum for high schools that would meet all the national standards.

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

As prerequisite course requirements for admission to the professional programs have changed, we have, upon the suggestion of the program directors at UNMC and Creighton University altered the curriculum required of our students who will be entering into the professional programs at those institutions.  For example, Creighton University College of Occupational Therapy recently altered its admissions requirements so that students would need to have completed a specific number of credit hours of undergraduate work in each of six areas, we reworked the curriculum that our students in the HPHOP pre-OT program were required to take so that they would meet the admissions requirements of Creighton University (the Professional School partner in the HPHOP program).

 

Social Sciences

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

Applied History

            Applied History does not have an external advisory board for class content.

 

            History & Social Science

The History and Social Science programs have no external advisory board at this time.

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

Applied History

The single faculty member meets with constituents individually, meaning that she speaks with museum directors and administrators individually about what their needs are. The faculty member also belongs to several professional museum organizations that are active on a regional and national level:

            American Association of Museums

            Professional Interest Committee

                        EXHIB – Committee on Traveling Exhibits

            Standing Professional Committee         

                        MMC – Museum Management Committee

                        COMPT – Committee on Museum Professional Training

                        NAME – National Association for Museum Exhibition

                        EdCom – Committee on Education.
American Association for State and Local History
Association of College and University Museums and Galleries
Mari Sandoz Heritage Society
Mountain-Plains Museums Association

            Presenter at 2006 Conference
Nebraska Museums Association

            President until September 2006
Nebraska State Historical Records Advisory Board

            Gubernatorial appointment until April 2008
Nebraska Travel Association

 

History & Social Science

We seek contact with external constituents in several ways.  For instance, as mentioned earlier, Dr. Hyer and Ms. Karen Enos (Education Department) have organized Native American Welcome Day twice a year at the college since fall 2004.  Through a generous Vision 2011 grant, Dr. Hyer and Ms. Enos have met with groups of Native American students from the Pine Ridge Reservation, Pine Ridge, South Dakota, Oelrichs, South Dakota, and Nebraska communities such as Chadron, Gordon, Rushville, and Alliance.  This activity is primarily used as a recruitment activity; however, it also serves for participating faculty to gain a pulse on Native students in the region, some of whom will choose to enroll at Chadron State College.

 

Second, Dr. Hyer is a member of the Western Nebraska Native American Advisory Council.  This group has been in existence since fall 2004.  Carol Rempp, the coordinator of Native American education for the state of Nebraska, has organized meetings which occur on at least a quarterly basis at the college.  College faculty, along with teachers and administrators from secondary schools in the area, meet in order to discuss how to improve Native American student success.  Participants share ideas and coordinate strategies and plans.  This advisory body is quite helpful in promoting CSC’s Native American Welcome Day.

 

Third, since spring 2003, Chadron State College has been the home of History Day for Nebraska’s Panhandle District.  Dr. Rankin oversaw History Day from 2003 to 2005.  In 2006, Dr. Austin took over the event.  Students from various communities within the Panhandle and north-central Nebraska take part in this annual activity.  Like Native American Welcome Day and the Western Nebraska Native American Advisory Council, History Day offers faculty the opportunity to meet and interact with future potential students and their parents.  From these interactions, faculty members learn about the academic needs of members of local communities.  

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

Applied History

The Applied History program was developed and implemented. We are the only undergraduate program museum program in our service area. This year the proposal for a Museum Studies minor was approved by academic review. Through the Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center, the College has been able to bring in several speakers and presentation on museum issues, most significantly as host of the Nebraska Museums Association annual conference in 2004.

 

            History & Social Science

            This question is answered in our above response to question 2.

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

Applied History

            At this time, the Applied History program has not formed any particular partnerships.

 

            History & Social Science

This question is also answered in our above response to question 2.  We intend to continue all three partnerships: Native American Welcome Day, the Western Nebraska Native American Advisory Council, and History Day.

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

Applied History

The development of promotional materials for the program is one of the suggestions that we have received and implemented. As Chadron State’s program is an undergraduate program, we are receiving inquiries from high school counselors regarding the program and students who may be interested in pursuing this area of study.

 

One of the suggestions the program has received from external constituents was that the program needed to develop specific promotional materials for the program. This suggestion was passed to the instructor from representatives from the Admissions Department. The suggestion was passed to them by high school guidance councilors. The instructor, with the help of the staff of the Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center, designed and printed a poster for distribution. Those posters were then taken posted around campus and were given the all of the Admissions representatives.

 

History & Social Science

Through informal conversations with individuals from throughout the region, we have strived to extend our services to all parts of our service region.  In addition to IDL and online courses (mentioned in Criterion Four), seven history courses have been either created or updated for purposes of Directed Independent Study.  Students from all over western Nebraska have completed these courses.

 

Visual & Performing Arts

 

1.      Does your unit have an external advisory board?  If so, describe how it was formed, who serves, and how often it meets, and any useful suggestions this board has provided to improve the functioning of your unit.

 

Art

Art department does not have an external advisory board.  Again our only external board would be NCATE where the Art Education Program meets the State of Nebraska and the National standards for Art Education.  There is a national organization called the National Association of Schools of Arts and Design, however, we are not a member primarily because we are not big enough in size.

 

            Theatre

No

 

2.      If you do not have an external advisory board, how do you contact external constituents in the region in order to understand the changing needs of constituents and communities?

 

Art

Faculty contact other college and university colleagues, attending Art Conferences, talking with colleagues in the high schools, understanding their needs at that level through K-12 education.  We put on several high school art workshops which bring external constituents to campus.  Placement of art teachers (graduating from our program) in the region, requires constant contact with surrounding communities as well as connections and feedback.  The art faculty attend recruiting fairs and take recruiting trips in the region as well as network with regional artists and educators.  Our gallery series has public comment books for each art exhibit.

 

The Art Department subscribes to numerous journals and publications, some general art information others are specific to the media being covered.  Industry and Fine Arts publications are represented as well. 

 

            Theatre

            Please see department response to the next question.

 

3.      Describe any activities in the past five years that your unit has undertaken with, or provided to, external constituents?

 

Art

Advanced Graphic Design students did projects for local businesses and also local regional businesses call and ask for assistance with different problems the students may be able to work on.  Every year we provide two high school workshops, fall and spring, and during that time we bring in between 60 – 100 students from high schools in the panhandle and highway 20 regions where we put on workshops and meet with the high school teachers and provide educational opportunities for the schools in our service region.  We put on numerous demonstrations, workshop, activities for all kinds of external groups, such as church groups, cub scouts, boy scouts, girl scouts, local arts organizations, rural schools, etc.  We have very active art gallery schedule with two galleries in Memorial Hall and this is advertised in the region.  So when schools make field trips or come to tour CSC we are there to give some kind of lecture or introductory information on the show or exhibit that is taking place. 

·        Numerous tours and presentations to visiting school groups, both elementary and high school

·        Tours and presentations to local and regional art groups

·        Visiting artist lectures and demonstrations

·        Up to eighteen exhibitions per year of artwork by local, regional and national artists, free and open to the public

·        Annual high school art workshops

 

            Theatre

The Theatre Program offers a Theatre Day each year for High School instructors and students from which valuable input is received from area students and teachers.

 

The Program has participated in the American College Theatre Festival, which results in a visitation by a “respondent” who provides feedback on quality and effectiveness of the selected productions thus allowing both students and faculty to get an objective view of strengths and weaknesses not only in the production, but in the coursework from which these productions evolve.

 

The Theatre Program also requests written responses from faculty outside the discipline that serves as a qualitative “review” for the production.

 

The Theatre Program has  recently included an Audience Survey for all productions seeking feedback on quality of acting, set design, light design, costume design and overall success.

 

The Faculty also participate as adjudicators for Western Trails, Panhandle, Ord Chanticleer Festival, and the Wyoming State Theatre Tournament each year where valuable input and insight is gained from students, high school instructors, and colleagues from sister institutions.

 

We supply major productions to all Dawes County K-8 grades (2005 and 2006) filling the void left by the dissolution of the Nebraska Theatre Caravan.  CSC Theatre now provides the only major theatre production available to the elementary and middle schools within our service region.  Last year’s production was HONK!  This year’s production will be Jungalbook.  We have also developed a study guide that will be provided to teachers based on the Character Counts Program currently used at Dawes County Public Schools. We wanted to go the next step in providing the teachers with preparation for the show and enhance our educational outreach.  We put these ideas together in a document that could be sent to ALL the teachers that wanted ideas.  We are also making music CD's to go with them and taking "hard copies" to the schools.  Two performances of Jungalbook will take place on Oct. 6, 2006.  These two shows will be attended by 600-700 K-8th graders from Dawes County, the Pine Ridge, and perhaps Box Butte, Sioux and Sheridan Counties.

 

The Theatre program has plans for presentations of selections from The Vagina Monologues in a special program funded through a local grant aimed at educating and reducing domestic violence.

 

4.      Describe any partnerships that your unit has undertaken in the past five years with external constituents.

 

Art

Many times artists that show in our gallery are regional artists and also we have the traveling faculty show to regional galleries.  Print making classes are developing a regular exchange of exhibits; critique is given of each others’ works and then a response in writing.  Not only is there a traveling art show going around at this time, but in summer 2006 all of the Art Faculty are joining together to put on a faculty exhibit with the South Dakota School of Mines, where we will also follow it up with possible lectures to their classes at School of Mines this fall.  The Graphic Design students in the advanced class last fall – did an internship with an amusement park in Scottsbluff, including brochures and posters.  Another student did posters for a barbershop in Crawford; another student did logo and stationery for a lawn business in Chadron.  Also, students work with print shops, national parks, businesses, art organizations, community organizations where the students gain experience doing the graphics design work.  Students who are not graphic design students may also participate in internships at the same facilities

·        Graphic design students created posters for Chadron Earth Day Community Celebration

·        Graphic Design students do internships of freelance work with local and regional businesses and organizations

·        Highway 20 Art Day

·        Print exchange with other schools trade student work and examples of  the work produced

 

            Theatre

In 2003, the program expanded the “Children’s Theatre Workshop” to include a tour of elementary schools in the Panhandle Region.  In 2003 this group performed at Crawford, Gordon, Rushville, Alliance, Hemingford, Crawford, Harrison, and for all of the Dawes County elementary students.

 

The Theatre Program collaborated with the Music Program to produce the musical HONK! that included two daytime performances for over 900 elementary and junior high students from the Dawes County School District.

 

The two daytime performances of HONK! above were sponsored by the Chadron Library Foundation through a partnership with the Theatre Program.  This commitment has been renewed for 2006 with Jungalbook.

 

We were approached by local representatives of Family Rescue Services and the Ministries in Higher Education to provide selections from The Vagina Dialogues aimed at addressing domestic partner violence.  This project is being funded through a local grant and will take place October 10-21, 2006.

 

5.      Describe any suggestions from your advisory board or from external constituents that you have implemented within your unit in the past five years.  How did you obtain these suggestions?

 

Art

Answers were provided in the previous questions. Primarily, without an external board, these areas are covered in our own feedback loop in our assessment plan.  The following are addressed:  These are the goals, this is what we learned from the students, this is what was learned about our courses, our facilities, our equipment and the feedback is what we hope to accomplish the next year or at least lay the foundation work.  Example:  in the Graphics Design area we saw a need to provide Design service to several units in our area, workshops, provide services to visiting groups, we maintain an active gallery schedule, provide educational opportunities for schools and groups.  All of this is our need to provide education experiences outside our department but also it’s in response to their needs from us on how we can provide or help them with things they do.  Being an ambassador for the art department and talking to local people encouraging dialog of what services the art department can provide.

 

            Theatre

Virtually all of the new courses, programs, assessment mechanisms and technical additions mentioned above resulted from this process. These suggestions were received from the myriad of ways in which a performing arts program comes in contacts with elementary and high school students and teachers, audience members,