Criterion One:  Mission and Integrity

 

Applied Sciences

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

Applied Sciences

The mission of the Applied Sciences Department is to provide academic programs, educational preparation, and leadership opportunities for students seeking careers in the Applied Sciences of Agriculture/Range Management, Family and Consumer Sciences, and Industrial Technology.  In addition, the Applied Sciences Department focuses on applied research significant to the region, and provides service to the western high plains through consulting and in-service workshops in conjunction with industry, educational institutions, and other organizations.

 

         Relationship

Overall the Applied Science department is highly committed to preparing today’s students for real world, applied careers.  The department’s first mission relates directly to the College mission statements 1, 2 3, 5, and 6. 

 

Statement 1:  Specifically, the programs in Applied Sciences are the only four-year degrees of their kind in an area ranging from Kearney, Nebraska in the east to Laramie, Wyoming in the west; north to Spearfish, South Dakota, and south to Ft. Collins, Colorado, and drawing students from a regional area of approximately 96,000 square miles.  Regional educational programs such as the Early Childhood Education conference, the Animal Science Playday, and the Range and Forestry Short courses are unique in this region.  The current President of the Nebraska Section of the Society for Range management is a CSC faculty member.

 

Statement 2:  Classes such as Families in Society; Humankind, Society, and Technology; Global Food Systems; Early Childhood Education; International Food Policy; and programs such as Lifespan Wellness all apply.  The majority of these classes are General Studies that contribute to the interdisciplinary nature of this part of the CSC educational experience.  All students in the Applied Sciences program must complete the General Studies program that is intended to promote global and multicultural awareness and perspectives.

 

Statement 3:  The department focuses on hands-on (applied) learning from the freshman to graduate level.  Many of the classes are associated with laboratories where students apply their classroom learning, classes such as Vegetation Inventory & Analysis, Principles of Soil Science, Principles of Animal Nutrition, Cisco, CAD & CADD, Kinematics and Machine Design, Food Management and Services, and Program Management.  Each program has classes that are also delivered on-line, through Interactive Television (ITV), and hybrid (combination of face-to-face and online delivery).

 

Statement 5:  The Applied Sciences department has developed several new programs, classes and delivery methodologies to meet the needs of the students.  New programs such as Wildlife Management and Lifespan Wellness and new classes such as Range and Fire Ecology and Vegetation Inventory and Analysis all fill the need of the student to achieve employment with the federal agencies.  The faculty also continuously adjust classes in response to assessment feedback to meet the indicated need of the students. 

 

Statement 6:  Classes such as Agricultural Seminar and Seminar in Issues in Human Services all fit this mission.  Departmental clubs such as Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS), Ag, Wildlife, Pre-Vet, Rodeo, and Animal Product Evaluation Club (APEC) all promote professional development and the nurturing of independent thought and comradery of all students.  Many of these are student chapters or affiliates of their professional organizations.

 

The Applied Sciences second mission on research fits well with the colleges missions 4 and 7.  Students in the programs require students to conduct laboratories and write up results following the scientific method.  The seminar classes require presentation of talks and abstracts based on conducted research.  Many students in these programs conduct Independent Research projects that require scientific write-ups; some have even presented these projects at regional, state and international professional meetings, the latter resulting in published abstracts for them.  Several of the students in the department have acquired Student Career Experience Programs with the United States Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and United States Forest Service (USFS), and the United States Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) that have required them to collect research level data in these positions.

 

Additionally, we have mission statements for each of our disciplines:

 

Agriculture

The mission of the agriculture program is to address the educational needs of individuals interested in rangeland management, domestic livestock and/or wildlife management, soil and plant sciences, and production processes and techniques.

 

Family and Consumer Science

The mission of the Family and Consumer Sciences academic program is to engage students in learning the theories and practicing the professional skills needed to empower individuals and families throughout the lifespan to manage the challenges of living and working in a complex world.

 

Industrial Technology

The mission of the industrial technology academic program is to provide students with the educational preparation to enter careers in industrial management and industrial technology education.  Industrial technology addresses the principles of automation, quality assurance, communications, construction, manufacturing, energy, power and transportation.  The application of systems and processes associated with manufacturing, construction and education, as they apply to the service region of the institution, is a major component of the program.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

The Department of Applied Sciences Mission statement is available in many forms.  It can be obtained from the current general bulletin, directly from the department, and is currently provided in the Agriculture/Range Management, FCS and ITE newsletters.  Currently each programs mission and learning outcomes are available on the CSC web site.  The department’s mission statement will also be available on-line in the immediate future.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

A common theme throughout the three programs that comprise the Department of Applied Sciences are outcomes that focus on our students analyzing, interpreting, utilizing, and applying knowledge gained from their respective programs and general studies.  All of these traits are stressed throughout the college’s mission statements especially mission 4.  These programs also value student’s abilities to conduct critical thinking to solve real-world applied problems that they will encounter in life following graduation.  These programs also recognize the global nature and influences of the world on these programs and the student’s futures.  These continuously evolving influences are used to modify the classes and their content.  A specific example of this was the efforts of the department to work to develop global studies materials and presentations for the Honors Program based on global current issues presented in existing Applied Sciences classes.  ITE specifically focuses on developing a skill set of industrial, construction and educational processes as they apply to the regional as well as global economies, and the range program recognizes the highly competitive and global role of agriculture in the local, national, and world marketplaces.

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

The Department of Applied Sciences has several classes that incorporate diversity into them.  Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) classes 224, 324, and 424 address ADA 'universal accessibility' as a design challenge, floor plans are analyzed and modified to be inclusionary, guest speakers and field trips are used to reinforce classroom analysis; FCS 123, 324, 341 all explore international contributions to fashion and textile marketing, homes and interiors; FCS 335 and 436 are general studies classes that focus on diversity; FCS 235, 236, 320, 332, 437 pay significant attention to global customs and traditions as they impact foods and families.  AGRI 242 explores the roles of early black American, Hispanic, and Native Americans as cowboys and settlers of the west, AGRI 339 explores Native American plant uses, and AGR 132 explores the global animal market and the importation of animal breeds.

 

In the Child Development Center (CDC) all of the staff is learning sign language and Spanish.  They are labeling areas in the CDC with sign language and Spanish words.  Handouts are given to families supporting natural, inclusive practices and diversity/tolerance.  Pictures are placed around the CDC depicting diverse cultures.   Social gatherings with educational components that support different populations are held.  Puppets, dolls, toys, music, etc. supporting diverse needs and populations are utilized as teaching tools.

 

Access to the Burkhiser Building where all Applied Sciences classes are held is, for the most part, Handicap Accessible.  Faculty work with the Student Academic Success Services (SASS) to help identify and work with students who have learning disabilities to help these students succeed.  Members from the SASS and the Tutoring Center work with the faculty of the department to inform the student about the services offered and to assist them in improving their successes in education.

 

Business & Economics

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

Mission Statement:  The faculty of the Department of Business and Economics (henceforth the Department) is committed to preparing students for challenging careers in the rapidly changing, highly technological and culturally diverse world.  The fundamental purpose of the Department is to be the premier provider of professional business programs in our service region.  We strive to combine excellence in teaching with appropriate coursework and classroom environments that emphasize critical thinking, human relation/communication skills, theoretical and professional skills, and lifelong learning environment designed for creative problem solving and decision making.

 

The Department’s mission relates to the College mission in providing teaching, scholarship, and service in the western high plains states.  The Department is committed to enriching the quality of life in the region by providing educational opportunities, research, service, and programs that contribute significantly to the vitality and diversity of the region.

 

The Department faculty are involved in local, regional, and national leadership roles.  Faculty are involved in attending and presenting at local, regional, and national conferences. 

 

The Department’s undergraduate programs require Business Administration students to complete general studies coursework to promote global awareness, multicultural perspectives and regional relevance.  Integrative teaching and supportive learning opportunities for students are provided through various media: On campus, ITV, Online, Hybrid courses. 

 

The Department supports student organizations, research, and scholarship.  Honorary organizations and discipline specific clubs are provided for students.

 

An advising plan is in place for the Department faculty and students.  A website has been developed with advising information provided.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

The Department’s mission is distributed electronically on Chadron State College’s website. http://www.csc.edu/business/

 

A hardcopy of the Department’s mission is located in the Chadron State College General Bulletin.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

The Department requires all undergraduate Business Administration students to take a core set of classes in addition to fulfilling the requirements for an option.  This core is also required of our General Business students.  These core courses address the coverage of fundamental business competencies:  Accounting, Economics, Management, Quantitative Business Analysis, Finance, Marketing, Legal/Social Environment, and International Issues.  The core classes assist our Students in preparing for “positions in business and economics” and fulfill some aspects of the Department and College mission.  Our students have been academically exposed to technological and professional subjects that will assist our students in preparing for careers and lifelong learning.  These courses assist the College in meeting its mission of “providing educational opportunities” in the region.

 

We connect our excellence in teaching with the following examples: 

 

A.  The ETS Major Field Test is taken by our seniors prior to receiving their degree.  The eight areas of assessment on the ETS Major Field Test are:  Accounting, Economics, Management, Quantitative Business Analysis, Finance, Marketing, Legal/Social Environment, and International Issues.  This test is given every fall in October and every spring in March. 

 

B.  MBA students are required to prepare and present an MBA portfolio, and the faculty evaluates the portfolio.

 

The Department sponsors extracurricular activities such as SIFE and PBL which provide our students with an out of classroom experience which enable them to “gain knowledge about business and economics for professional and personal growth.”  These experiences are consistent with our mission.

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

The Department, as a subset of Chadron State College, complies with the open admission policy of Chadron State College.  Additionally, the Department, for qualified applicants, students and employees, receive consideration without regard to age, race, marital status, gender, religion, national origin or disability.  Once admitted or employed, individuals have not been denied benefits nor excluded from participation in academic programs, non-academic programs or activities.

 

The Department faculty, upon initial employment, received education and training directly correlated to equal admission opportunities including but not limited to Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Educational Amendments of 1972, Title IX, Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Americans with Disabilities Acts and Chadron State College policies related to these Acts.

 

The faculty have been required to provide statements in each course syllabus of nondiscrimination policy/equal educational opportunity policy, diversity, civility, intellectual real estate/copyright notice and use of technology, as a method to achieve compliance with the Acts.

 

Access to Burkhiser and classrooms in which Department courses have been offered have been handicap accessible as well as the parking areas.  Access between floors of Burkhiser can be achieved by elevator.

 

The faculty cooperate and collaborate with appropriate campus offices and directors when individuals with learning disabilities have been identified.  For example, when a student has been identified with learning disabilities by Jerry Cassiday, Disabilities Services contact, the faculty have been informed of the student and specific disability.  The faculty, in cooperation and collaboration with Frances Gonzalez, Tutoring Center, have made arrangements to assist the student to achieve success in the course.  For example, if a student had a reading disability the faculty provided copies of exams, quizzes and problems to the Tutoring Center for individuals to read statements to the student for their responses.  Additionally, students who have had hearing impairments have been provided an interpreter.  The interpreter attends classes with the student and signed the lectures and discussions to the students.

 

Communication Arts

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

Below is a copy of the mission statement approved by the Communication Arts faculty members and pending submission to Academic Review:

 

The Communication Arts department helps students gain tools for life-long learning and for developing more meaningful and effective voices in the ongoing conversation of our communities and our culture.  We seek to accomplish our mission through an active program of communication study, practice, and research.

 

Relationship

 

The academic unit mission statement has been written to complement CSC’s mission statement. Please see the attached form in Appendix A for a breakdown of how courses in Communication Arts met the mission of the department and college.  (This is still under construction!! Will be finished soon)

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

Once approved, we will also place it in our brochures and on our web page.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

The Communication Arts student learning outcomes are tied to the mission of the college and the mission of the department.  This is illustrated in Appendix A (which is in progress and not complete).

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

Below are specific examples of diversity activities in most Communication Arts courses: 

 

CA 125: Fundamentals of Oral Communication The text selected for CA 125 has a diversity component included within every chapter with particular emphasis on nonverbal communication differences between cultures, how culture is created, how to prepare and present a speech to an audience with diverse members, diversity in interpersonal relationships, information on the benefits of diversity when working in groups and teams and sensitivity to diversity issues in interviewing. 

 

CA 144: Oral Interpretation of Literature includes instruction on how to select the most appropriate literature for a student to present, how to be sensitive to a diverse audience and current trends in oral interpretation as they relate to race, class and gender issues.

 

CA 230: Conflict Resolution and Mediation includes an entire unit on how differences in cultural practices can lead to conflict and how we can work to overcome and understand the culture of another person to resolve conflict issues.  Once again, students searched the internet for examples of nonverbal cultural differences and in class discussed how these differences could lead to misunderstandings without using words.

 

CA 233: Presentational Speaking includes information on audience analysis and understanding how to relate a speech topic to a diverse audience including issues of race, class, gender, age and educational level.  

 

CA 260: Introduction to Communication Theory presents a variety of theories related to how we communicate differently between genders, through the media and in workplace situations.

 

CA 333: News Journalism includes a unit on the importance of avoiding sexism and ageism and of seeking stories from all areas on campus.

 

CA 420: Relational and Family Communication, students examine the racial diversity of families on primetime television.  They made lists of programs showing diverse racial families and talked about which minority groups are underrepresented on television. 

 

In both CA 434: Editing and Design and CA 431: Publication Projects, the instructor talks a great deal about the need for a newspaper to include coverage of minority groups.  Results of those discussions include the following:  The Eagle, the weekly campus newspaper, has tried to give equal coverage to women's and men's sports, and we've resisted calling the women's teams the Lady Eagles.  The Eagle has tried to cover special events including Disability, Hispanic Heritage, Black History and Native American awareness months.

 

·        Communication Arts faculty is very diverse:

                  3 females, 1 male

·        The Eagle newspaper has a diverse student staff; they also publish stories and features on issues of diversity (e.g., the needs of Native American students, the International Students club, and women’s sports).

·        The Public Relations professor is currently having her students work with Health Services on the Pine Ridge Oglala Sioux reservation to produce an instructional video on dental hygiene.

·        The program offers courses in intercultural communication and gendered communication.

·        Communication Arts faculty serve as advisors and a resource to numerous organizations, schools, art clubs and professional consultants to our region.

 

Counseling, Psychology & Social Work

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

Counseling

Community Counseling

The mission of the Community Counseling program is to prepare quality professionals to pursue careers as community counselors in various public and private agencies and systems.

 

School Counseling

The mission of the School Counseling program is to prepare quality professionals to be endorsed as school counselors who will meet the needs of students and educational settings of tomorrow.

 

Relationship

The unit’s mission provides the educational opportunities in our specific profession. The mission of the unit provides research experience for the budding professionals of the program. This program specifically prepares students for careers in this region.

 

Psychology

The mission of the Psychology Program at Chadron State College is to support the college, the Department of Counseling, Psychology and Social Work (CPSW), and the larger community by providing learning experiences that inspire student achievement, instill ethics and values, promote service, and facilitate lifelong learning. Psychology students will develop the knowledge, understanding, appreciation, discipline, and skills that will enable them to function personally and professionally as informed and socially responsible citizens. Students will be prepared to pursue graduate training, careers within the disciplines, or careers in affiliated areas.

 

Relationship

Psychology students will develop skills, knowledge and values that will enable them to contribute to the region in areas of service and research. Additionally some will pursue advanced degrees in psychology and other areas, which will enable them to make significant differences in their communities.

 

Social Work

The Bachelor in Arts in Social Work at Chadron State College provides an undergraduate experience that fosters student development of knowledge, skills, and values in order to function as generalist Social Workers who enhance the capacities and quality of life for individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities within the region of West Nebraska, Southwest South Dakota, Southeast Wyoming, and Northeast Colorado.

 

In order to carry out the social work program mission of Chadron State College, the Social Work faculty strives for excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service. Social Work faculty teach foundation curriculum with a sensitivity to student needs and with an awareness of the knowledge, skills, and values appropriate to a beginning social work professional at a baccalaureate level. To maintain student learning, Social Work faculty use innovative technology, experiential and active learning approaches, and outcome-based learning that individualize curriculum and instruction to the needs of individual learners.

 

Social Work faculty continually evaluate courses through student process evaluations, course evaluations of teaching and objective attainment, peer reviews of teaching, assessment of written assignments, and tests of student learning. Social Work faculty seek to integrate scholarship with student learning through presentations at regional and national conferences, special projects, and community consultation. Social Work faculty provide service to the College, community, and professional associations by serving on local and regional boards and committees and participating in projects with local human service systems.

 

Relationship

As the only BA Social Work Program within 300 miles, with a large student body consisting of first-generation college students, with an absence of professional social workers in regional human systems, and with a majority of its social work graduates practicing in the region, the Social Work Program strives to fulfill the CSC commitment to enhance capacities and quality of life within the region.  CSC Social Work Program seeks to graduate competent, generalist social work professionals who practice ethically and who have the knowledge, values, and skills to work effectively with systems at all levels, particularly individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.  The development of competent social work professionals who can function as generalists is consistent with the rural/frontier context, the mission of the college, and the intent of undergraduate social work education.

 

The Social Work Program seeks to prepare beginning professionals who can assume leadership in developing a region increasingly part of a global oriented society.  Social work knowledge in working with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities, combined with knowledge of policy processes, research, diversity, and oppression enhances the capacity of social work graduates to speak to the strengths and capacities of diverse peoples in systems of all sizes.  These components of Social Work Program are consistent with the mission of the college to serve the diverse peoples of the region, particularly Native American and Latino populations and the purposes of social work education.  The mission of CSC and the Social Work Program share a strong focus in preparing students to live and practice in a diverse world including, but not limited to culture, ethnicity, gender, age, abilities, religious and spiritual beliefs, family arrangements, income, opportunities, strengths, influence, and power.  The CSC mission of developing strong diversity opportunities for students to attend workshops, speakers, and the integration of diversity issues in many courses provides opportunities for social work students to engage the greater college community.

 

In order to carry out the Social Work Program mission within the context of the mission and goals of CSC and by the standards set by Council on Social Work Education, the Social Work faculty strives for excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service.  The focus on excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service is reflected in a Social Work Program that motivates students to seek knowledge, develop analytical reasoning, place emphasis on the capacity and strengths of all peoples, and learn effective communication.  Social Work faculty teach foundation curriculum with a sensitivity to student needs and with an awareness of the knowledge, skills, and values appropriate to a beginning social work professional at a baccalaureate level and to a majority of students who are first-generation college students.  Consistent with CSC mission and goals and EPAS, Social Work faculty use innovative technology, experiential and active learning approaches, and outcome-bases learning that individualize curriculum and instruction to the needs of individual learners, combining knowledge, skills and values in assignments, lectures, and discussions to stimulate learning.  Social Work faculty continually evaluated courses through student process evaluations, course evaluations of teaching, and objective attainment, peer reviews of teaching, assessment of written assignments, and tests of student learning.  Social Work faculty seeks to integrate scholarship with student learning through presentations at regional and national conferences, special projects, and community consultation.  Social Work faculty provides service to the College, community, and professional associations by serving on local and regional boards and communities, and participating in projects with local human service systems.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

Counseling

The unit provides the Counseling mission statement to students in the Department of CPSW graduate student materials. This mission is offered to students through the general bulletin, the graduate student handbook and on the CP&SW website (currently under revision).

 

The Graduate Counseling Student Handbook is provided to all new students entering into the program during the graduate student interview and presents the mission of the graduate Counseling program. The Counseling Practicum and Counseling Internship Handbook will list the mission statement as well. These two handbooks are given to students in their final courses of the counseling program.

 

Psychology

The mission statement has been developed and revised in the last three years. The new General Bulletin (2007-2009) will contain the revised mission statement. The Psychology Program is also in the process of developing a Psychology Student Handbook, which will contain the mission statement and student learning outcomes. This handbook is being designed in conjunction with the program website.  The anticipated completion date of the Psychology student handbook is November 1, 2006.

 

The current website materials (retrieved January 16, 2006) contain material from a brochure that was created in 2003 and needs to be updated. Department members have corresponded with Don Anderson (CSC Webmaster) about updating the website to include the mission statement for each program in the Counseling, Psychology and Social Work Department.

 

The current website and mailed brochure includes an informational statement that is not representative of the psychology program or other areas of the department, and program representatives intend to review and revise it pending catalog changes.

 

Social Work

The CSC Social Work Program has developed both brochures and posters which have been distributed through the region by faculty, students and distance education staff.  Faculty members have spoken at regional collaborative meetings, at agencies and hospitals, and on the radio.  Faculty members have met with distance site students at an open house and for individual interviews.  Information regarding the program has been published in local papers around the region.  In addition, Field Instructor training and Program Advisory Committees have been established.  One Social Work faculty member has served on a regional Board of Directors for a domestic violence agency.  At every opportunity, faculty encourages students to major in Social Work, or take Social Work courses to enhance their personal and professional skills, and encourage community members to attend college.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

Counseling

The following is a list of the outcomes anticipated by the counseling unit to meet the college and unit missions. Italicized segments after each outcome will provide a specific example to answer the aforementioned question.

 

Community Counseling Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the Community Counseling Program students will be able to:

1.      Demonstrate knowledge of human growth and development; social and cultural foundations, helping relationships; groups and group procedures; career and lifestyle development; appraisal; research and program evaluation; and professionalism;

  EXAMPLE:

      Oral exams are given to each student when completing of all course work. These exams give students the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of each standard that has been identified through the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

 

2.      Demonstrate entry-level clinical skills as a professional counselor;

EXAMPLE:

The internship experience is designed to provide this learning outcome. Students plan and seek out sites that can provide supervision and counseling opportunities to complete the required hours that indicate they are ready to apply for licensure and an employment post.

 

3.  Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of the Code of Ethics of the American Counseling Association (ACA);

EXAMPLE:

Oral exams are given to student upon entering into internship and completion of all course work. During the oral exam an ethical scenario is presented to demonstrate the knowledge that a student will draw on in applying the ethical considerations that are involved in the scenario

 

4.      Apply the ACA ethical principles professionally

EXAMPLE:

As well as the example of the oral exam, students provide within the portfolio that each student completes prior to the oral exam answers to specific ethical questions.  Supervision experience in both practicum and internship review the ethical codes and guidelines to ensure the student has the knowledge to use them within their counseling experience.

 

5.      Fulfill the pre-graduation requirements of Title 172, Nebraska Department of Health Professional and Occupational Licenses Regulations in the areas of course content and supervised clinical experience;

EXAMPLE:

Completion of an outlined plan of study demonstrates the fulfillment of the obligation requirements for licensure with in the State of Nebraska and surrounding states.

 

6.      Analyze the need of  rural populations and develop appropriate referral and networking skills;

 EXAMPLE:

Students completing the practicum and internship courses, as a part of the curriculum, develop networking skills and practice referring processes. Specifically rural population needs are analyzed in COUN 535 Multicultural Counseling, COUN533 Ethical and Legal issues and COUN 536 Foundations of Professional Identity.

 

7.      Demonstrate empathy and skill with diverse cultural, social and gender groups;

EXAMPLE:

The course specifically centered on the skills demonstration of empathy and diverse populations are COUN 531 Counseling and Communication Skills and COUN 536 Multicultural Counseling

 

8.      Understand one’s personal and professional strengths and weaknesses and to maintain supervisory and peer consultation relationships;

EXAMPLE:

The analysis, description and reflection of the strengths and weaknesses is completed in COUN 639 practicum and COUN 633 internship during the faculty and site supervisors that are working with each student.

 

9.      Provide consultation services to local, state and professional communities;

EXAMPLE:

Within the scope of the practicum and internship courses students work with a variety of local, state and professional communities within our region, i.e. Panhandle Mental Health, Region 1 Services, Head Start, Affinity , Inc., Lutheran Family Service.

 

10.  Understand research design sufficiently well to comprehend professional journal literature.

EXAMPLE:

EDCI 631 Introduction to Graduate Studies is the course that begins the journey for the students into professional literature. Other assignments within several courses throughout the curriculum require the student to write papers that use research skills and insight into the research process. The cumulating experience is demonstrated by the required portfolio each student submits providing examples of the students work in each course.

 

School Counseling Student Learning Outcomes:

Upon completion of the School Counseling Program students will be able to:

1.   Demonstrate knowledge of human growth and development; social and cultural foundations, helping relationships; groups, career and life-style development; appraisal; research and program evaluation; and professionalism;

EXAMPLE:

Oral exams are given to each student upon entering into internship and completion of all course work. These exams give students the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of each standard that has been identified with the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

 

2.   Demonstrate entry-level clinical skills as a professional counselor;

EXAMPLE:
Each counseling student completes COUN 633 internship through a counseling site that provides weekly supervision and opportunities to practice counseling as other professional staff practice within the site. The evaluation feedback from the site supervisor indicates the level of readiness the student has attained to enter into the profession.

 

3.   Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of the Code of Ethics of the American Counseling Association (ACA);

EXAMPLE:

Oral exams are given to student upon entering into internship and completion of all course work. During the oral exam an ethical scenario is presented to demonstrate the knowledge that a student will draw on in applying the ethical considerations that are involved in the scenario

 

4.   Apply the ACA’s ethical principles professionally

EXAMPLE:

As well as the example of the oral exam, students provide within the portfolio that each student completes prior to the oral exam, answers to specific ethical questions.  Supervision experience in both practicum and internship review the ethical codes and guidelines to ensure the student has the knowledge to use them within their counseling experience.

 

5.   Fulfill the pre-graduation requirements of Title 92, Nebraska Department of Health Professional and Occupational Licenses Regulations, in the areas of course content and supervised field experience;

EXAMPLE:

Completion of an outlined plan of study demonstrates the fulfillment of the obligation requirements for the state of Nebraska

 

6.   Understand the need of rural populations and develop appropriate referral and networking skills;

 EXAMPLE:

Students completing the practicum and internship courses, as a part of the curriculum, develop networking skills and practice referring processes. Specifically rural population needs are analyzed in COUN 535 Multicultural Counseling, COUN533 Ethical and Legal issues and COUN 536 Foundations of Professional Identity.

 

7.   Demonstrate empathy and skill with counseling diverse cultural, social and gender groups;

EXAMPLE:

The course specifically centered on the skills demonstration of empathy and diverse populations are COUN 531 Counseling and Communication Skills and COUN 536 Multicultural Counseling

 

8.   Understand one’s personal and professional strengths and weakness and to maintain supervisory and peer consultation relationships;

EXAMPLE:

The analysis, description and reflection of the strengths and weaknesses is completed in COUN 639 practicum and COUN 633 internship during the faculty and site supervisors that are working with each student.

 

9.   Provide consultation services to one’s local, state and professional community;

EXAMPLE:

Within the scope of the practicum and internship courses students work with a variety of local, state and professional communities within our region i.e. Gordon School System, Scottsbluff School System , Gering School System. Hay Springs School System, Douglas, WY School System, Arthur School System.

 

10.   Understand research design sufficiently well to comprehend professional journal literature.

EXAMPLE:

EDCI 631 Introduction to Graduate Studies is the course that begins the journey for the students into professional literature. Other assignments within several courses throughout the curriculum require the student to write papers that use research skills and insight into the research process. The cumulating experience is demonstrated by the required portfolio each student submits providing examples of the students work in each course.

 

Psychology

The Psychology program at Chadron State College has adopted the student learning outcomes or goals suggested by the American Psychological Association (APA) for undergraduate programs in psychology. Individual students who have completed a psychology major should show progress toward the following learning goals:

 

1.  Demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.  (Knowledge Base of Psychology)

Students are expected to acquire knowledge about the field of psychology that will prepare them for graduate school or for careers related to psychology. They will have a greater understanding of themselves and others, as the result of the knowledge that they have gained, and will have the potential to become leaders in society. This is connected to the Chadron State College mission of enriching the quality of life in the region, and offering opportunities, research and programs that contribute to the region.

 

2.  Understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation.  (Research Methods in Psychology)

The understanding of research methods and interpretation is critical for advanced work in psychology, but is important for all citizens in terms of becoming educated consumers of research information that is presented in the public media. This fits with the mission of Chadron State College in that students will develop an understanding and appreciation of the unique characteristics of the region.

 

3.  Respect and use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and, when possible, the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes.  (Critical Thinking Skills in Psychology)

This learning objective is related to evaluation of media information, and to ability to structure responses to personal and social issues that might affect an individual. These educational objectives will enable graduates to evaluate potential options.

 

4. Understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues.  (Application of Psychology)

This learning objective refers to applications of psychology in many personal and societal issues. Psychology goes beyond personal counseling to deal with medical issues, organizational issues, design and development issues, program planning and advertising issues, motivational issues and so forth. Psychology is integrally related to many aspects of life and work.

 

5.  Value empirical evidence, tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a science.  (Values in Psychology)

The values promoted in psychology reflect ethics of science and are focused on empirical evidence. In addition, there are ethical guidelines regarding clinical settings, and use of data. These guidelines also address issues reflecting tolerance of differences, including multicultural differences.

 

6.  Demonstrate information competence and the ability to use computers and other technology for many purposes.  (Information and Technological Literacy)

Students are required to use computers to collect information, and to evaluate information. They learn about ways to use both standard techniques that are important in today’s society, and specialized software (e.g., statistical software) that will help them to use information more appropriately. 

 

7.  Communicate effectively in a variety of formats.  (Communication Skills)

Communication is incorporated into all classes. Students often complete written and oral reports, and also often work in groups requiring collaborative communication focused on a group goal.

 

8. Recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of sociocultural and international diversity.  (Sociocultural and International Awareness)

Students will develop an understanding and appreciation of multicultural issues, both on a regional level, and on an international level. This understanding will enable them to interact more effectively with regard to diversity in the region, and ideally to become leaders in promoting relations among diverse cultures.

 

9.  Develop insight into their own and other's behavior and mental processes and apply effective strategies for self-management and self-improvement.  (Personal Development)

Students will develop a better understanding of their own behavior and that of other people. This understanding should help them to deal with issues related to their relationships and careers in the future and will enable them to be more productive.

 

10. Pursue realistic ideas about how to implement their psychological knowledge, skills and values in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings.  (Career Planning and Development)

Students will be able to use knowledge, skills and values associated with a psychology degree in many settings. Regional needs indicate high need for people with psychology backgrounds to work in human services. The knowledge that graduates acquire allows them to be more productive in these settings.

 

Social Work

Program Objectives are then operationalized as Learning Outcomes.  Several courses share a Program Objective as the faculty strives to assist students’ developmental process and skill level acquisition by sequential progress through the courses.

 

EXAMPLE

Critically assess and intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities using multidimensional theories and strategies that enhance the social functioning and interactions of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities by involving them in accomplishing goals, developing resources, and preventing and alleviating distress.

 

1.      Demonstrate the knowledge of and the ability to critique and analyze practice theories.  Apply critical thinking skills within the context of generalist social work practice.

a.       SW 231: Professional Social Work, a beginning understanding of generalist Social Work practice and the history of the profession.  SW 251: Human Behavior in the Social Environment I, articulate and defend personal values, behaviors, and attitudes towards Biophysical, Psychological and Social hazards based on logic and relate those to the human diversity inherent in to the professional ethics outlined in the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics.

b.      SW 337: Diversity in the Rural Environment, demonstrate knowledge of the relationship between individual and social behavior in the context of a diverse rural social environment. SW 432, demonstrate the ability to analyze, critique and identify appropriate applications for social work practice theories and modalities of human development and social systems.

c.       SW 433: Methods II: Therapeutic and Task Groups, integrate and apply several theoretical paradigms of group work to practice with groups.  SW 434: Policy Analysis and Advocacy, apply policy analysis theories and methods within the context of specific policy problems. SW 434: Policy Analysis and Advocacy, understand how policy analysis impacts and enhances the social workers ability to critically analyze and problem solve in social work practice.

 

4.  Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

Counseling

The following information is derived from the current diversity report submitted to the CSC Diversity committee yearly.

 

Objective:  Integrate multicultural/diversity issues into curriculum.

Action Plan: Continue to include and add extensive information on discoveries and contributions from and methods used by diverse cultures in various courses.

·        Covered multicultural focus in Counseling Theories.

·        Discussion of diverse cultures (African-Americans, American Indian, Asian Americans and Hispanic Americans) in COUN 535 Multicultural Counseling. 

·        Students were required to attend the presentation of multicultural speaker Darrell Davis.

·        Student small group presentations conducted on a diversity group and culturally related food (i.e. Asian American presentation and Chinese food for class).

·        Diversity incorporated into readings, class discussions, activities and films in Developmental Psychology, Social Psychology, and Educational Psychology.  Students were also required/encouraged to attend diversity events.

 

Action Plan: Continue to encourage the interest of gender in coursework and career success.

·        Discussed gender issues in Counseling Theories and Career.

·        The majority of students are female.  Addressed issue of career options in advising and other settings.

 

Action Plan: Continue to offer a wide variety of student success seminars to participants through various programs.

·        Sponsored Health and Human Services coming to discuss employment and application process with students.

·        Reactivated Chi Sigma Iota and offered conference attendance in order to expand knowledge and experience of members.

 

Objective: Provide opportunities in diversity education for faculty, staff and students.

Action Plan: Faculty and staff will continue to invite guest speakers from diverse cultures to share their knowledge with students, faculty and staff.

·        Presentation to the COUN 435/535 Multicultural Counseling class from the director of the Chadron Native American Center.

·        The School Diversity Committee is no longer operating so participation in events sponsored by Campus Diversity Committee is encouraged.

·        Faculty attendance at campus diversity, White Buffalo, and international student club activities.

 

Action Plan: Continue to offer diversity education opportunities to faculty, staff and students through conferences, workshops or various media.

·        Faculty attended a local diversity conference and two out of state conferences for diversity.

 

Objective: Provide activities and opportunities for campus community diversity appreciation/awareness enhancement.

Action Plan: Plan and implement field trips in the region to areas such as the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, museums, state and national parks.

·        Field Trip to Pine Ridge Heritage Center, Red Cloud School, Wounded Knee, HS.

·        Field Trip to Guadalupe Center, Scottsbluff.

·        Attended a conference with faculty and students in Pine Ridge, SD.

 

Objective: Enhance opportunity and success for participation in higher education by under-represented populations.

Action Plan: Continue to support efforts to recruit and retain students from under-represented populations to include activities that will address the needs of under-represented populations as well as all students.

·        English as a Second Language (ESL) student spoke to Internship class regarding personal experience.

·        Support of Native Students through contact with Multicultural Counselor.

·        Support of international students through contacts with Frances Gonzales, Tutoring Center Director.

·        Encourage all students to participate in personally meaningful research activities.

 

Action Plan: Implement an outreach program at area schools that targets under-represented populations using success stories of students at CSC from these populations.

·        Attended Hay Spring Student Conference meeting and discussing rural issues with high school students.

·        Faculty and students attended District 6 of the Nebraska Counseling Association meetings. Prime focus to provide networking and sharing of resources in the frontier area of the panhandle of Nebraska.

 

Objective: Develop and continue efforts to internationalize the curriculum and experiences for students.

Action Plan: Continue to coordinate the discussion of international historical work in particular fields of study.

·        Students present information about individuals from other cultural and ethnic groups in COUN 535 – Multicultural Counseling.

·        International perspective addressed in classes such as Multicultural Counseling.

 

Objective: Target recruitment and retention efforts to reach, recruit and enroll, and retain students from under-represented populations.

Action Plan: Inform students about various societies, clubs, and websites which promote diversity.

·        Assignments required students to access National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) and the Gay and lesbian site, Gay and Lesbian Alliance against Defamation (G.L.A.D.D.).

·        Promote in class events sponsored by White Buffalo Club.

·        Collect and make available information about minorities in psychology and organizations/programs to increase enrollment of minorities in psychology.

 

Action Plan:  Continue to provide a resource center for housing diversity materials such as tapes, books, and literature.

·        Department added many films with ethnic diversity and current experiences of ethnic populations; video library includes tapes such as “Daughter of Dynang”, “Return to Wounded Knee”, etc.

 

Action Plan:  Establish relationships between the minority student population, Multicultural Counselor, and local and regional organizations or groups relating to that population.

·        Early Alert and referral of Native American students to Multicultural Counselor.

·        Encouraged membership in White Buffalo Club by Native students.

·        Referral/feedback to Multicultural Counselor about students with problems.

·        Also work with and support international students.

 

Action Plan:  Research scholarship opportunities available for minority students.

·        Explore minority scholarships and research grants available through Chi Sigma Iota, and the American Counseling Association, Nebraska Counseling Association and the American School Counseling Association.

 

Action Plan:  “Foundations of Excellence”.  Continue to participate with the college community in the Foundations of Excellence for a successful first year experience. 

·        Liaison with students transferring in from West Nebraska Community College (WNCC) to Counseling Program.

·        Liaison with students transferring in from North Platte Community College (NPCC) to Counseling Program.

·        Attended WNCC/CSC quarterly meeting.

 

Action Plan:  An orientation and ongoing support mechanism will be developed and implemented for non-traditional students.

·        On-going support for non-traditional distance education students by site visits/advising/personally teaching from distant sites.

·        Advisee contact with all advisees according to departmental plan.

 

Action Plan:  Distribute information to high school counselors outlining special services (advising, tutoring, career services, disability services, etc.) available at CSC to enhance student success in higher education.

·        Implement the School Counselor Lunch to present different learning issues – Monthly meeting of counselors on Hwy 20.  Graduate Counseling faculty attended and presented important issues to school counselors at the High School Advisory Council meeting (9:00-1:30p.m., February 22, 2006; Tena Cook, CSC facilitator).

 

Action Plan:  Continue to assist the retention rate of under-represented student populations by contacting and/or supporting students in need of academic advising and/or tutoring.

·        Contact by e-mail, phone and personal advising sessions with non-traditional and Native students as well as contact with students’ advisors from other departments.

 

Objective:  Enhance learning opportunities available to students with special needs, including those with gifted as well as challenged learning capabilities.

Action Plan:  Increase the mention of methods to successfully teach students with varying learning abilities including gifted as well as learning disabilities.

·        Utilized a variety of teaching techniques and encouraged students to identify their learning styles/adaptive techniques for memory and speech preparation.

·        Taught classes experientially, through traditional activities and by group process.

 

Objective:  Continue to enhance cultural, regional, and international activities available to students, faculty, staff, and community members.

Action Plan:  Continue the support of the White Buffalo Club to increase awareness of the Native American culture and provide a support group for Native American students.

·        Encouraged student participation and membership in various clubs and activities, announced club activities in class and encouraged students to go see presentations:  dancing, powwows.

 

Objective:  Provide multicultural events for the campus and the community.

Action Plan:  Host International Coffee hours to include culture sharing by various ethnic groups.

·        Attended International Coffee House and promoted student attendance.

 

Action Plan:  Encourage faculty and staff to promote student attendance and participation in multicultural events.

·        Counseling faculty and students attended Daryl Davis, Tim Giago and Jonathan Mooney presentation.

 

Objective:  Develop and continue efforts to internationalize the curriculum and experiences for students.

Action Plan:  Provide the opportunity for students to present Seminar papers at regional and national conferences.

·        Students have developed conference presentations and posters.  CSC students met with conference presenting students from various cultural and ethnic backgrounds and discussed their cultural experiences with other CSC students upon their return to the CSC campus.

·        Students have participated in State and District meetings and offices for the current year.  CSC students worked with other student officers from other state colleges who were from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds and discussed their cultural experiences with local CSC graduate students upon their return to campus.

·        Fourteen students worked in varied community and school internship settings from North Platte, Scottsbluff, Chadron, Hay Springs, Gordon, Rushville, Torrington WY, and Lusk WY.

·        Required counseling internships that may include internships working with different minority groups and other challenged populations.

 

Objective:  Enhance in-class and out-of-class diversity learning opportunities.

Action Plan:  Support student participation in studies abroad or cultural field trips.

·        Encouraged and supported Counseling majors who were applying for study abroad programs and scholarships.

·        Joe Simmons, Director of the Chadron Native American Center, and Ann Young, CSC graduate student presented information on Lakota history to the COUN 535 Multicultural Counseling class on March 21, 2006.  This information gave CSC Counseling graduate students a better understanding of the important and diverse needs of clients from Native American backgrounds.

 

Psychology

    • Work with Jerry Cassiday, Counselor, and the Dean of Students to make accommodations for students with disabilities or other emergencies.
    • Monitor students for potential referrals to Dean of Students and Mr. Cassiday and potentially suggest needed accommodations in the event of illness or family crisis.
    • Dr. Carnot attended multicultural training in Summer 2005 in Gering.
    • Classes taught in area of culture and psychology.
    • Multicultural component included in all or most classes.
    • Multicultural field trips and speakers.
    • Trip to Oglala Lakota College (OLC) to talk about offering programs there.
    • Assist internship office in finding mentors for school age children at risk.
    • Several interns sent to Pine Ridge Job Corps.
    • Online classes and programs to reach students in other regions.
    • Psychology faculty and students attended Daryl Davis, Tim Giago and Jonathan Mooney presentation.  Daryl Davis presented the program, “Klan-destine Relationships,” to the CSC campus on February 2, 2006.  Tim Giago, publisher of the Lakota Journal in Rapid City, South Dakota, presented a program “Diversity Awareness: A Lakota Perspective” to the CSC campus in October 2004, Jonathan Mooney presented on ADHD and Learning Disabilities to the CSC campus in February 2005.
    • Attended International Coffee House and promoted student attendance.
    • Diversity incorporated into readings, class discussions, activities and films in Developmental Psychology, Social Psychology, and Educational Psychology. Students were also required/encouraged to attend diversity events.
    • Student presentations at conference in Chicago May 2006.  Students experienced meaningful connections with students and researchers from other areas and cultures.
    • Faculty attendance at campus diversity, White Buffalo, and international student club activities.
    • Support of Native students through contact with Multicultural Counselor.
    • Support of international students through contacts with Frances Gonzales, Tutoring Center Director.
    • International perspective addressed in classes such as Multicultural and Culture & Psychology.
    • Collect and make available information about minorities in psychology and organizations/programs to increase enrolment of minorities in psychology.
    • Explore minority scholarships and research grants available through Psi Chi and American Psychiatric Association (APA).
    • Contact by e-mail, telephone and personal advising sessions with non-traditional and Native American students as well as contact with student’s advisors from other departments.

 

Social Work

·        Prepare beginning pre-professional students who can assume leadership in developing a region increasingly part of a global oriented society.

·        The Social Work program shares a focus in preparing students to live and practice in a diverse world including, but not limited to culture, ethnicity, gender, age, abilities, religious and spiritual beliefs.

·        Integration of diversity issues in courses provides opportunities for social work students to engage the greater college community.

·        Majors are required to take Human Diversity courses in other disciplines as well as Diversity in the Rural Environment which is offered and required by the program.

·        Diversity education is integrated into the entire curriculum for Social Work students as an integral part of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics.

·        Social Work education provides training in advocacy on behalf of populations at risk of poverty and discrimination.

 

Education

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

The mission of the Chadron State College Education Unit, founded on educating Visionary Leaders, is committed to creating diverse educational environments that are thoughtfully structured to provide opportunity for the success of all learners, now and for the future.  We accomplish our mission by providing teacher, administrator, and counselor candidates with deliberate and appropriate educational experiences.  Knowledge, skills and dispositions are developed through extensive classroom and field-based interactions.

 

            Relationship                 

The CSC Vision statement speaks to creating educational opportunities, research, service, and programs that contribute significantly to the vitality and diversity of the region. 

 

The Education Unit mission statement is accomplished by providing teacher, administrator, and counselor candidates with deliberate and appropriate educational experiences and opportunities.   Knowledge, skills, and dispositions are developed through extensive classroom and field-based interactions that contribute significantly to the vitality and diversity of our rural high plains region. We are preparing educators to, in turn, provide their students and constituents with opportunities to grow and expand educationally, with an appreciation for the diverse nature of our region.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

The unit’s mission is conveyed to our constituents in a variety of ways.  It is electronically posted on our web-site, identified in unit and institutional publications (i.e., Teacher Education Handbook, CSC General Bulletin) and as a part of our National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) Accreditation Institutional Report, which is also made available to our public.  The Unit mission is also identified as part of our Unit’s Institutional Report Card, via Title II, requiring all teacher preparation institutions to publish an annual Institutional Report Card.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

Education Unit Student Learning Outcomes have a direct relationship to the mission of the Unit and the College.   Both mission statements reflect a value and commitment for diversity in educational environments.  The following student learning outcomes speak to this commitment.

 

• Demonstrate skills in creating and implementing curricula that meet the needs of all learners through effective communication and positive interpersonal relationships.

• Interpret and utilize current theory and research findings to enhance individualized learning consistent with varied and acceptable learning and teaching styles.

 

In addition, the Unit’s Conceptual Framework embraces diversity, in that one of the framework’s six components is “Human Relations/Diversity”.

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

Chadron State College and the Education Unit are committed to graduating competent, professional, caring teachers with the requisite knowledge, skills and dispositions to help all students learn.  Embracing the concept of diversity through celebration of our differences is a part of that commitment; preparatory programs are intentionally planned with the goal of exposing candidates to a variety of alternate learning environments and student needs.

 

For preservice students (those enrolled in the teacher education program), the most concentrated level of instruction in cultural diversity occurs in the student’s senior year (Professional Year ).  In the Human Relations course, EDUC 415, instructors and students consider the influence of human relationships upon learning, growth, and development as related to exceptional populations.  Preservice students receive training in the development of interpersonal skills, classroom climate, and in meeting the emotional needs of all students in a pluralistic society (EDUC 415/415S).  In EDUC 415, preservice students develop and teach lessons that incorporate and reflect a value on diversity.

 

Preparing preservice students to work with a broad continuum of exceptionalities is specifically addressed in the course, SPED 230:  Introduction to the Exceptional Learner, and is also integrated and reinforced later in the curriculum in both the EDUC 431S: Special Methods and EDUC 412S: Secondary/Middle School General Methods courses.

 

During academic years 2001-02 and 2002-03, EDUC 300/320: Observation & Participation (O & P) preservice students (Junior level) participated in a two-day multicultural Hispanic oriented field experience as part of the Nebraska Partnership for Quality Teacher Education Project—a grant project which provided monies to support preservice training efforts.  In year one, preservice students traveled to schools in North Platte River Valley communities, where they observed in P-12 schools with large populations of Hispanic students. This trip included a visit to the North Platte Hispanic Cultural Center, with a presentation from the Center Director on issues affecting Hispanic immigrants. In the Year 2 experience, preservice students traveled to Colorado with visitations in Greeley, CO schools (large Hispanic population) and to Denver, CO schools (large African American population), thus providing an urban education field experience for the elementary and secondary students. These field experiences were designed to give preservice students an experience with a diverse student population in an urban setting. The Spring 2006 semester will once again find O & P (Junior level) preservice students participating in a similar field experience to the North Platte River Valley community schools.

 

In 1994 the Education Unit restructured its preservice curriculum to include a two-day cultural immersion field experience on South Dakota's Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, 45 miles to the north.  This field experience is a requirement for all professional year preservice students and is part of the Human Relations/Multicultural Education course (EDUC 418).  This required course gives preservice students cause to consider the influence of human relations upon learning, growth and development.  Discussion includes an examination of significant problems in education as they relate to multi-ethnic and special needs student populations. Emphasis is placed on the development of interpersonal skills, classroom climate, and in meeting the emotional and learning needs of all student learners.  The associated [course] field experience works as a means for increasing personal and professional sensitivity to other cultures.

 

At the graduate level, candidates are required to take SPED 530:  Characteristics of Mild/Moderate Disabilities.   This course examines social, behavioral and emotional disabilities of learners.  Identification of disability areas and special needs characteristics are examined in this course as well as all aspects of the total environment in which these learners are educated.

 

Administration

Two of the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards for school administrators address diversity.  A majority of the courses in CSC Educational Administration programs contain elements relative to diverse issues and information.  ISLLC Standards 4.0 and 6.0 speak specifically to diversity. These standards were adopted by the CSC administration program in 2002, and their influence is reflected in advanced program course curricula and assessment measures.   EDAD 639: Elementary and Secondary Administration contains items on the Evaluation Summary that relate to issues of diversity. In the Specialist Program (School Superintendent), the course EDAD 631: Public and Human Relations, taken by all candidates, addresses the State of Nebraska requirement for human relations.  The content of EDAD 631 focuses on the analysis of administrative and leadership principles; practices and materials that facilitate the adjustment and interpretation of schools to their internal and external publics; processes to organize, administer and evaluate the district human resources program; and development of a school district public relations plan.

 

Teaching

In the Elementary Education Graduate Program, many courses have at least one objective focusing on diversity.  EDCI 638: School Law, is required in both the elementary and secondary education programs, deals with legal issues and state constitutional provisions and the rationale for the judicial interpretations of legal mandates—many of which fall under the realm of diversity.

 

Reading Specialist

Candidates pursuing the Reading Specialist Endorsement program discuss diversity issues in all courses.  READ 535: Reading and the At-Risk Student, covers diversity and reading issues in depth.  READ 635: Diagnosis and Correction, focuses on individual differences and the correction of reading problems.  READ 533: Approaches and Techniques for Teaching Reading, includes a large focus on English Language Learners and English as a Second Language issues, as well as techniques specific for teaching exceptional populations.

 

School Counseling

Candidates pursuing the School Counseling Masters Degree and/or Endorsement program must complete COUN 535: Multicultural Counseling, which specifically addresses issues of diversity.  Diversity is also addressed in COUN 541: Counseling Theories, and in COUN 632: Career and Lifestyle Development, where the review of the major theoretical constructs in counseling and psychotherapy, with incorporation of multicultural relevance in the treatment of each theory, are discussed.

 

Recruitment and Training Opportunities

Although the demographics of the CSC student body do not closely align with the averages across the nation, they do mirror those of the county and the service region, in general.

 

Recognizing this challenge in providing opportunities for candidates to interact with others from diverse backgrounds and experiences causes the campus and the Education Unit to focus more closely on alternate means of providing for these experiences.

 

Examples of this effort are the Western Nebraska Excellence in Education Conference and the 6th Annual Native American Education Symposium, both held each October on the Chadron State College campus.  Co-sponsored by the Nebraska Department of Education, these two conferences offer the opportunity for candidates and western Nebraska educators (as well as those from South Dakota and neighboring areas) to come together in a forum for growth and learning.  Candidates are encouraged to participate in conference activities and interact with professional presenters, in-service teachers and administrators, and teacher candidates from other P-12 schools and programs.  Themes for conferences range from addressing poverty and its impact on educational issues, to inclusionary practices/activities and the successful building of positive school cultures for all students.  An Education Unit faculty member initiated the grant proposal to the Nebraska Department of Education that established funding for this highly successful program on the Chadron State campus.  The Native American Education Symposium also brings those of different environments and cultural backgrounds together, addressing topics of increased equity and culturally appropriate instructional strategies in helping all students learn.  Educators from neighboring Educational Service Units, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, candidates, faculty and administrators join to discuss relevant issues and find solutions. 

 

A new event, the “Native American Welcome Day”, was hosted for the first time in December, of 2004 by the Education Unit through a grant awarded under CSC’s Vision 2011 Strategic Plan funding.  Native American students participate in a day of activities and interactions with CSC faculty, staff and students.  Native American students are invited from regional P-12 schools (including Pine Ridge Reservation and Rosebud Reservation schools) to visit CSC as a means to relieve anxiety, trepidation, and to problem-solve potential obstacles to obtaining a college education.  In addition, Native American students and candidates discuss educational and cultural issues at CSC, tour dorm rooms, the Physical Activity Center, the financial aid office, the Student Center, and the Mari Sandoz Heritage Center -- all in support of the pursuit of a college education. This program is co-sponsored with the Department of Social Sciences.

 

English & Humanities

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?  If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

English

            (Please note: This mission statement has not been approved by the Academic Review Committee)

 

It is the mission of the English program to provide students with a scholarly environment of the highest caliber in which to pursue an education in the riches of the English language.  The program seeks to educate students in an array of subjects within the broad domain of English studies, including English grammar, critical and creative writing, American, English and World literature, traditional literary genres, film, literary theory and criticism, and teacher training.  The program’s curriculum encourages students to explore literature’s interdisciplinary relationship to the other humanistic disciplines, such as cultural studies, philosophy, religion, history, and art.

 

Spanish

 

The Spanish program does not have an officially stated mission statement at the present time.  We will be writing one to submit to Academic Review; this statement will be ready to submit by October 1.  Once approved, we will also place it in our brochures and on our web page.

 

Relationship

 

The English mission statement is aligned with and supports the college’s mission as a premiere institution of higher learning in the High Plains region.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

English

 

Once approved, we will also place it in our brochures and on our web page.

 

Spanish

 

Once approved, we will also place it in our brochures and on our web page.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

 

English

 

CSC Mission Statement

English Unit Mission

 

Examples

 

 

 

 

1.        To integrate strong undergraduate discipline preparation with interdisciplinary traditional liberal arts education, promoting global awareness, multicultural perspectives and competence, and regional relevance.

 

2.       To integrate acquisition, discovery, and application of knowledge and experiential learning to develop students' higher-level learning and applied skills and competence in accessing and assessing information in all available formats.

It is the mission of the English program to provide students with a scholarly environment of the highest caliber in which to pursue an education in the riches of the English language.  The program seeks to educate students in an array of subjects within the broad domain of English studies, including English grammar, critical and creative writing, American, English and World literature, traditional literary genres, film, literary theory and criticism, and teacher training.  The program’s curriculum encourages students to explore literature’s interdisciplinary relationship to the other humanistic disciplines, such as cultural studies, philosophy, religion, history, and art.

 

ENG 435

Students will demonstrate an ability to respond critically to the rich traditions, forms, and histories related to Native American culture and their influence on the humanities, in general, and literary studies in particular.

 

 

ENG 435

Students will show evidence that they recognize the role of critical theory, philosophy, and other intellectual movements in their understanding of Native American Literature.

 

 

ENG 331

Students will demonstrate an understanding of diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects across cultures, ethnic groups, geographical regions, and social roles.

 

 

ENG 440

Students will demonstrate evidence of the development of a well informed, coherent, logically unified, and fully defined critical theory that will articulate his or her understanding of language, how literature is defined along with its various cultural and ideological functions, and how meaning is constructed in works of literature and other art forms.

 

 

ENG 440

Explain the relationship between language and culture, including how a given language develops and is acquired by speakers, and the impact of cultural, economic, political, and social environments upon language.

 

 

ENG 431 (Topics: Gothic Lit.

Students will apply theoretical approaches to interpreting Gothic literature, with an emphasis on psychoanalytical and feminist readings.

 

Spanish

 

The new mission statement will be tied to the student learning outcomes which already reflect the college’s mission to serve the students in the high plains region.

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

General studies courses continued to include ethnic, religious, gender, and geographic diversity in reading selections.  For example, ENG 233: Elements of Literature syllabi typically include authors such as Langston Hughes, Toni Morrison, Leslie Marmon Silko, Amy Tan, and Judith Ortiz Cofer, among others.  In ENG 135/136: Composition I and II instructors explored topics on the learning-disabled and on Native American and African cultures.  HUM 231: The Humanistic Tradition typically includes an entire unit on “identity and liberation” which explores issues like the civil rights movement, gender and sexual equality, and the continuous struggle for social and economic parity in Latin American countries:

 

The Department offers a course in ENG 436: World Literature, which is required of majors and serves as a Global Studies option in General Studies.  This course requires students to read a number of non-western works in translation, especially the literature of the middle-east.  American and English literature courses include a unit on feminist writers and issues. 

 

In the Honors seminar, students were required to attend the Tom Giago presentation on Native American issues.  George Watson, Justice Studies faculty member, visited the class to discuss tribal court issues, and this was followed up by a lively online discussion forum.

 

Below are more specific examples of faculty diversity activities in their courses:

 

ENG 233: Elements of Literature, includes a unit on "Race, Class and Gender." Here are some selected activities: Students watch a film about the Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance. They read a story by Ralph Ellison called "A Party Down at the Square," which is a lynching story.  The instructor then shares with them through some web resources the grisly and horrific case of a lynching in Omaha in 1919—that has some disturbing scenes and images that echo the Ellison story (a lynch mob, the burning of the boy, the crowd "celebrating" around the corpse).

 

In ENG 335A/335B: History of American Literature students read a number of texts in both courses dealing with race issues, beginning with the age of encounter, and the response to the Indian inhabitants of America, to the early race tension in writings from the Revolutionary war (De Crevecour's "Letters from an American Farmer, for example) and the slave narratives of Equiano, Wheatley, Frederic Douglas, Harriot Jacobs, and Uncle Tom's Cabin.  Students discuss feminist issues in works by Margaret Fuller and Fanny Fern.  In the second half of the survey course, they read W.E.B. Dubois and Booker T. Washington, and a whole host of writers from the Harlem Renaissance.

 

In ENG 431/531: Topics (Literature of the American West), students spent a lot of time discussing issues of immigration, migration and westward expansion.  The course featured quite a bit of literature chronicling the conflict between various peoples trying to "win the west" as well as readings that chronicle a Native American and Gringo/Mexican issues.

 

Once again, students searched the internet for examples of nonverbal cultural differences and in class discussed how these differences could lead to misunderstandings without using words. 

 

 PHIL 432: Ethics classes continue to address racial diversity, sexual orientation, feminist issues, and decisions about treatment of the physically and mentally disabled populations.  One instructor also did a Phi Theta presentation on the Cuny Table which dealt with the history of relations between settlers and Native Americans and eventually edited a manuscript on the topic of Cuny Table written by a descendent of the one of the original settlers of that region.

 

Faculty diversity:

·        Two of the English faculty members have done service-learning projects in Composition courses; one was related to regional WWII veterans that resulted in a traveling exhibition (around the region and to Washington D.C., where it was exhibited in the U.S. Senate building), and the other resulted in a student written book published on the history of Chadron.

·        The faculty offer courses in Native American literature, World literature, and various topics courses that address issues of diversity in the literary canon.

·        The poetry professor does numerous poetry readings around the region and the state.

·        One of the program’s composition professors regularly performs at story telling festivals throughout the high plains region; most of her poetry and stories are about the experiences of pioneer women on the high plains.

·        The program has on its faculty a nationally recognized scholar whose expertise is on the female Victorian writer George Elliot.

·        The entire mission of the Spanish program addresses issues of diversity, especially regarding language and culture.  The Spanish program offers summer study abroad opportunities for students in Spain and Mexico.

 

Health, Physical Education & Recreation

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

Health Education

 

The main focus of the Chadron State College Health Education Program is to provide an endorsement in Health Education.  It is the goal of the department to develop leaders in education who support the academic mission of department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation.  Graduates with a health endorsement will have the knowledge to instruct students and community members to actively practice and promote good health and well-being through education, prevention, and intervention programs designed to enhance ones ability to participate in, and benefit from acquired knowledge and experience gained in regard to living a healthy life style.

 

Physical Education

 

The mission of the Physical Education Teaching Endorsements, within the Health, Physical Education Department is two fold:

1.      To provide high quality education and training, leading to teacher certification in teaching Physical Education.

2.      To provide professional, managerial, and analytical skill development for potential HPER educators.

 

Recreation

 

The mission of the Chadron State College Recreation Program is to meet the educational needs of individuals interested in the broad field of Recreation which includes the disciplines of Sport and Leisure Services, Outdoor Adventure Education, and Fitness and Exercise.  The students in Recreation will develop the philosophies, knowledge and skills to become leaders in these disciplines.  The program is designed to foster a commitment to providing lifelong recreational opportunities for the general public.

 

Relationship

 

These three mission statements have direct relationship to the college mission statement in their purpose to prepare students for the immediate placement into both the regional and national workforce.  The students will be able to enhance their surrounding populations with innovative and diverse ideas and applications.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

The mission statements will be produced and posted on the CSC HPER web-site, posted within the Nelson Physical Activity Center, and included in the 2007-2009 General Bulletin.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

The HPER departmental student outcomes for the 2005-2007 General Bulletin are:

 

·        Students will acquire professional preparation in Physical Education.

·        Students will acquire professional preparation in Health Education and related areas.

·        Students will acquire professional preparation in Coaching.

·        Students will acquire an area of specialization at the Master’s Degree level in Physical Education.

·        Students will acquire managerial knowledge and experience in the Field of Recreation.

·        Students in the General Studies program will acquire knowledge in the development of physical and mental health, a sense of well being and knowledge of ways to enhance the quality of life.

·        Students will acquire knowledge and skills through participation in physical activity, competition, and instructional theory in athletics and intramurals.

 

Students will develop in their preparation for entering their chosen field as noted in the mission of the College.

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

The HPER Department continually strives for the development of an understanding of diversity and its relationship to the success of our society.  The department offers activity courses for general education requirements which would accommodate special needs students. (HPER 101 – Adaptive Physical Education)  In addition, the department has infused within the curriculum, diversity issues relative to Health, Physical Education and Recreation (Women in Sports, Racism in Sport, HPER 421 – Philosophy of Coaching).

 

Justice Studies

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

The Justice Studies program provides the student with instruction in Criminal Justice and Legal Studies.  The program focuses on the building of knowledge in the areas of law enforcement, criminology, law, paralegal studies, courts, juvenile justice, forensic sciences, and corrections from a social science perspective. The program strives to promote basic principles of justice that enhance the criminal justice and legal professions and benefit the community at large.  The program seeks to produce students who are critical and ethical thinkers, knowledgeable about issues of crime, law and justice, and appreciative and mindful of their civic and social responsibilities to provide service and leadership in their communities.  The program provides students with the professional and academic preparation necessary for entry-level positions in public and private sectors.  The program also provides students with the preparation necessary for successful graduate study and endeavors to provide professionals with career-enhancing educational experiences.

 

Relationship

Whereas it is the mission of Chadron State College to "…enrich the quality of life in the region by providing educational opportunities, research, service, and programs that contribute significantly to the vitality and diversity of the region," it is the mission of the Justice Studies program to provide specific educational, research, and service opportunities.  Further, the program "strives to promote basic principles of justice that enhance the criminal justice and legal professions and benefit the community at large."  Paralleling the institutional mission of educating students, providing research and service is our program focus on preparing students to be critical and ethical thinkers, to be knowledgeable about issues in crime, law and justice, and to be appreciative and mindful of their civic and social responsibilities to provide service and leadership.

 

The following are several specific examples of activities that illustrate the Justice Studies program, its mission as implemented, and the relationship of the mission to the mission of Chadron State College:

 

1)      Sponsors two clubs, the Criminal Justice Club and the Legal Studies Club.  Both clubs are viewed as complementing the classroom experience.  The clubs are treated as a social, cultural and educational opportunity for students.  The clubs serve as an avenue for organizing student trips to law schools, correctional institutions, graduate schools, conferences, etc.  Each club also completes at least one community service project each year.  These projects have included a cell phone drive for victims of domestic violence, a domestic violence training session for professionals, a Christmas toy drive for children living in poverty, bingo parties and assistance at a local nursing home, Easter egg hunts for a local daycare, and other similar community service activities.  These types of activities provide a service to the community and region, teach students about civic and social responsibilities, and serve as a complement to the classroom.

2)      Sponsors workshops and training seminars for students, community members and professionals.  This past academic year (2005-06), the program has sponsored a three-day forensic science workshop, a domestic violence workshop, and numerous presentations by the Crime Commission and similar entities.  These service activities also build strong public and agency support for the faculty, the program and CSC.

3)      Includes in the curriculum numerous opportunities or requirements for students to engage in research and scholarly and creative activities.  For example, the capstone senior class includes the requirement that each student conduct an in-depth literature review and research paper on an approved topic.  The Justice Studies program includes an Honors in Criminal Justice and Legal Studies class.  Students in this class conducted surveys, analyzed data and presented their findings at a national meeting of the American Society of Criminology.  Students also presented their research at an academic showcase on campus.  

4)      Justice Studies faculty are quality teachers.  Positive student and administrative evaluations serve as evidence that faculty are knowledgeable in their field, that faculty are capable of communicating this knowledge in an understandable and interesting way, and that faculty consistently grow in these regards.  Justice Studies faculty have also availed themselves of institutional funds that facilitate enhanced knowledge and improved teaching.  Faculty regularly attend and present at regional, state, and national training, workshops, and conferences.  The program has also requested and been awarded Vision 2011 funds that are being used to facilitate research and teaching.  For example, the program will begin using a 'student response system" in the classroom in 2006.  This system is intended to enhance student learning and to improve an instructor's understanding of student learning.

5)      Faculty actively provide academic and career guidance for students.  Faculty regularly assist students in reviewing degree audits, enrolling in courses, drafting resumes, drafting cover letters, locating job openings, and contacting potential employers.  The program has also created a resource room that serves as a complement to the institution's Student and Career Services office.  The resources and facilities are of great help to students and faculty.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

·        Each discipline in our Unit has developed promotional brochures.  These are distributed around campus, mailed to high schools, taken to college fairs, community college visits, etc.

 

·        Our mission statement is posted on our page within the college website. 

·        Our mission statements and outcomes are published in the General Bulletin.

·        Our Unit regularly hosts conferences, presentations and workshops that are attended by students, employers, and citizens.  Our program, mission and outcomes are always made available and discussed at these events.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

Our mission statement describes, in broad terms, the overall purpose of our Unit.  For example, we strive to provide our students with a quality education in Criminal Justice and Legal Studies.  It is our mission to build a working knowledge of the American justice system, its components, and the students' future role in this social institution.

 

Our student learning outcomes (all revised as part of our ongoing assessment in 2004-2005) are more specific statements detailing what a graduate should know after successfully completing the degree requirements.  Flowing from those statements are the student learning outcomes for each individual class.  As one moves down the pyramid from mission statement, to each discipline's student learning outcomes, to individual class outcomes, one moves from the general to the very specific.  Conversely, the outcomes from each course are the pillars that the discipline outcomes are built on. This is visually depicted in the pyramid below.  The relationship is depicted in our new assessment curriculum grids.  Since the student learning outcomes are the foundation for the discipline outcomes and mission, the grids identify courses where each discipline outcome is introduced.

 

As previously mentioned, it is the mission of Chadron State College to "…enrich the quality of life in the region by providing educational opportunities, research, service, and programs that contribute significantly to the vitality and diversity of the region."  It is the mission of the Justice Studies program, then, to provide specific educational, research, and service opportunities.  For example, the program "strives to promote basic principles of justice that enhance the criminal justice and legal professions and benefit the community at large."  Paralleling the institutional mission of educating students, providing research and service is our program focus on preparing students to be critical and ethical thinkers, to be knowledgeable about issues in crime, law and justice, and to be appreciative and mindful of their civic and social responsibilities to provide service and leadership.  Please refer to our departmental student learning outcomes as well as the outcomes contained in Justice Studies course syllabi.

 

CSC Vision
Chadron State College aspires to be a premiere institution of higher education in the western high plains states, innovatively pursuing excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service. (CSC Vision 2011)

 

Pyramid DiagramMission
Chadron State College will enrich the quality of life in the region by providing educational opportunities, research, service, and programs that contribute significantly to the vitality and diversity of the region. (CSC Vision 2011)

 

 

 

Pyramid Diagram 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

·        All syllabi notify students of CSC policy and the process for requesting accommodation for documented physical or learning disabilities or any special needs.

·        Our disciplines make reasonable accommodations for documented physical or learning disabilities or special needs.

·        Our curriculum includes classes specifically addressing multicultural, subcultures, diversity, and gender issues.

·        Our curriculum includes study abroad experiences that involve exposure to other races, cultures, values, etc.

·        Our faculty regularly coordinate conferences and workshops to address needs in our region (e.g. Indian Child Welfare Workshop, Fair Housing Workshop, and Domestic Violence Awareness Workshop)

·        Our Legal Studies students have regularly been accepted into the University of Nebraska - Lincoln College of Law Pre-Law Summer Institute designed to prepare minority students for graduate study in law.

·        One of our faculty members participated in the Title III Grant Planning Committee.

·        In 2004, one of our faculty members received the CSC diversity award for faculty.

 

Library Media Program

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

The mission of the Library Media Program is to prepare students to be professional librarians for careers in the library and information sciences through the use of online instruction. Students are given the tools, knowledge and skills to select and organize materials, provide information and manage different types of libraries and media centers to meet the needs of the High Plains Region.

 

            Relationship

The relationship to the college mission is that both emphasize educational opportunities.  The librarians that graduate from our LMS Program will staff the school, college, special and public libraries.  The librarians will contribute to the vitality and diversity in the lives of all residents of the High Plains region by providing lifelong learning opportunities, useful resources and appreciation for literature and reading to diverse populations.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

The Library Media Program mission statement is distributed electronically on the Library Media Specialist web page, on class syllabi, and will be on new brochures and in the next college catalog.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

The student learning outcomes, the program mission and the CSC mission are related through online teaching of library media classes.  Some examples follow.  Student Learning Outcomes: Adapt and apply the principles of collection development, cataloging, reference, management and assessment in library environments (Unit Mission: to prepare professionals to manage a variety of libraries).

 

Student Learning Outcome: Able to describe formats of information sources with diverse points of view and discuss the legal and ethical responsibilities of providing access (Unit Mission: to prepare professionals with knowledge and skills in material selection and paper and online information sources).

 

Unit Mission: To prepare students to be professional librarians through online instruction (Vision 2011: to improve the effectiveness of teaching and learning).

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

The Library Media Program supports the Chadron State College mission for diversity. We contribute to the educational opportunities by offering our program, which consists of two majors and two minors, entirely on-line. Students learn to select materials for a range of patrons, taking into consideration patrons’ reading levels, physical limitations and cognitive abilities.  Students are prepared to select materials covering topics from diverse perspectives.  Students learn to write policies that do not discriminate against any groups of people.  Students are taught to provide information and library services for diverse populations including people from various cultures, abilities and learning styles.  From this group of diversity conscious students, we select and assign interns to library programs in the region. 

 

The Library Media program promotes global awareness and a multicultural perspective through our diverse catalog offerings ranging from such topics as geography, history, religion, art, etc.  Our selection class trains students to choose a variety of materials that are representative not only of diversity but of our area constituents.  We seek to ensure our regional relevance by offering materials that embody our high plains residents.

 

An example of the ways we seek to recruit and maintain students representative of the high plains population is evidenced by our recent receipt of endorsement by the state of Wyoming to accept our Library Media Program for School Librarian Media Specialist certification in their state.  The director of the library, Milton Wolf, has been invited by the Wyoming State Librarian to attend this year's (2006) Wyoming State Library Association meeting in September in Gillette to promote our Library Program there.  Following up on this invitation, he contacted the Chair of Western Council (representing all states west of the Mississippi) to see if they would permit him to work with them on producing a set of requirements for School Library Media Specialist certification in all the states that they represent. 
 
Unfortunately, they were not yet ready with their criteria of competencies to engage in such a dialogue; however, we will continue to pursue their imprimatur as they evolve their timetable on this issue. 
 
We have recently arrived at a memorandum of understanding with the Library Science Graduate Program at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, to integrate some of our coursework and to promote jointly in the surrounding states our programs and courses, both through normal publicity avenues and site visits.
 
To aid in the recruitment of staff, we guide our Human Resources department in suggesting probable advertising locations with the aim of attracting qualified applicants for our vacant positions.  We are also willing to cooperate with any student or employee to provide any reasonable accommodations they may need in terms of religious beliefs, physical disabilities, etc.

 

Mathematical Sciences

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

The mission of the Department of Mathematical Sciences is to produce graduates who will: demonstrate mathematical thinking as well as knowledge of the depth and breadth of mathematics; be able to communicate about and with mathematics; use technology to support mathematical processes and promote understanding; and apply mathematics in other fields.

 

Relationship

It is related to Vision 2011 with its emphasis on teaching and learning.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

The department maintains a website, revised a minimum of annually.  The mission statement is contained in the departmental assessment plan, and is presented in “bulleted” form for mathematics and IST in the 07-09 General Bulletin. 

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

The Assessment Plan was developed by developing a Mission Statement, then Performance Objectives, and for each of 4 Performance Objectives, 2-4 Program Learning Outcomes.  Please see attached.

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

Areas such as Mayan math are included in courses, and the history of mathematics component of general studies includes contributions from various cultures.  Students in teacher education are informed of the contributions of Benjamin Banneker (1731-1806), a renowned mathematician who for many years was known as “the first Negro Man of Science”.  Recruiting and distribution of materials is uniform without regard to cultural or ethnic differences.  Equity for distance students is sought by using SmartBoards and other means of distributing classroom events.  A SmartBoard is an interactive whiteboard that serves as an enhancement to communication in online courses, particularly hybrids, and is linked to the computer in a mediated classroom.  As the instructor interacts with the SmartBoard (via ultrasound/infrared stylus and contact) the signal is relayed through the computer to the projector, hence appearing on the projected image.

 

Music Department

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

The primary goal of the Chadron State College Music Department is to prepare musicians for careers in education or the music business.  The Music Department offers an undergraduate program designed to prepare individuals for a variety of different career areas in both the public and the private sectors through the following degree programs: Bachelor of Science in Education - Music Education K-12, Bachelor of Science in Education – Vocal Music K-8, Bachelor of Arts in Performance or Music Business (instrumental/vocal or piano studio operation emphasis).  Students majoring in music are expected to demonstrate proficiency in music theory, music history, music performance, music pedagogy, conducting, and basic piano skills.  Performance opportunities in large ensembles and in small ensembles provide students with hands-on experience necessary for the music profession.


The development of teaching strategies, critical thinking, and communication skills are an important part in the study of music at Chadron State College.  The students are given the opportunity to develop networking and marketing skills as performers and as educators.


The Music Department provides musical leadership to the campus through general studies and education courses and to the service region as the four year institution of higher education in the Nebraska Panhandle.

 

Relationship

The Music Program’s mission statement relates to the college’s mission statement:

·         Through our leadership role in cultural development of our students and the high plains population;

·         By preparing its students with strong musical competencies additionally, promoting cultural diversity and global perspective through musical performance;

·         In providing learning opportunities through music technology such as Smart Music, Digital Performance, Finale, and Garageband;

·         Through our commitment to change and innovation through program modification such as the Music Business Program and new hard disk recording class; and

·         By providing students with individualized personal academic advising and career advising.  Our faculty maintains close contact with all music majors.

           

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

Through live musical performances and placement of students in the public and private sector.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

The Music Program’s learning outcome is to prepare music majors for careers in education and business in both the public and private sector.  Student learning outcomes are designed to ensure that students are prepared as competent musicians.

 

As all musicians are expected to perform on an instrument or through singing, learning outcomes number one focus is on their music making abilities.

 

Musicians are expected to be literate in that they can read and write musical notation using a common vocabulary.  The second learning outcome focuses on fostering musical literacy.

 

Musicians are also expected to have a working knowledge of music from other historic style periods and cultures.  The third student learning outcome ensures that students will develop an appreciation for these elements.

 

These outcomes directly relate to the College’s mission statement.  We provide our students with innovative and supportive learning opportunities through creative teaching that incorporates evolving technology.  Students integrate acquisition, discovery, and application of knowledge developed in MUS 115/315 through musical performance in MUS 102/302 through MUS 110/310.  Our musical performances help recruit and maintain students’ representative of the high plains region.  The strong nature of our one-on-one musical teaching ensures students will have individualized personal advising. 

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

The Music Program provides diversity in musical programming in all performing ensembles and in course work for MUS 436, MUS 331, MUS 332, and MUS 333.

 

We contribute to the diversity of the region by:

·         Providing opportunities for students to perform music of other cultures;

·         Providing lectures on African American music and African characteristics to community organizations; and

·         Providing a wide range of musical programs and performances.

 

The Music Program promotes global awareness through:

·         Ensembles program music from Africa, South America, Eastern Europe, in addition to standard Western repertoire;

·         MUS 235 Elements of Music includes music of Latin America, Africa, Japan, and Indonesia;

·         MUS 436 African American Popular music traces African musical characteristics into American music.

 

A multicultural perspective is presented in:

·         Music Education classes MUS 331, 332, 333, and EDUC 431K which prepares education students to include multicultural perspectives in their classrooms;

·         MUS 109/309 Percussion Ensemble performs music based on African and Latin American styles;

·         MUS 106/306 which performs African-American, Latin American, and South American based music.

 

The Music Program seeks to ensure regional relevance by:

·         Music ensembles that provide many of the cultural opportunities in the high plains region (choir, wind ensemble, jazz ensemble, combo, men’s vocal ensemble, women’s vocal ensemble, vocal jazz ensemble, percussion ensemble, brass ensemble, woodwind ensembles, community band and chorus);

·         Hosting events such as the High Plains Band and Choir festival and the High Plains Jazz Festival;

·         Performing musical ensemble tours throughout the region.

 

We make recruiting and maintaining high quality students and staff representative of the high plains population a priority for the Music Program through:

·         Providing music scholarship auditions for high plains students;

·         Touring and performing which helps attract high plains students to the college. 

 

We support the college’s mission regarding ADA regulations by offering our program in a building recently renovated with ADA standards as a top priority, and by providing reasonable accommodations for students with physical limitations and hearing disabilities.

                         

Physical & Life Sciences

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

None as yet. Initial development was begun during spring semester 2006 and should be completed and approved by the department during the fall semester of 2006.

 

Relationship

No way at present because our mission statement has not been completed.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

Once developed mission statement will be added to the Physical and Life Sciences Department web site  which is currently undergoing renovation (anticipate completion during the 06-07 academic year) and eventually in (the Chadron State College General Bulletin) catalog (2007-2009).

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

NA to department mission, not developed yet.

 

Our goals are consistent with the college’s mission to take a leadership role in regional education, provide a strong discipline preparation, provide innovative learning experiences that integrate acquisition, discovery and application of knowledge etc.  Examples of this include; students in science laboratories being afforded the opportunity to utilize technologically advanced equipment including but not limited to High Performance Liquid Chromotography, Gas Chromotography/Mass Spectrometry, electrophoretic equipment, computer aided biological signal acquisition systems (Bio Pak), GPS units and others, and students completing degrees in physical science being required to design and conduct a senior research project and present the results at the Nebraska Academy of Science.  Additionally the department hosts a Panhandle Region Junior Academy of Science competition with science faculty acting as judges of junior high and senior high school student research projects and offering critical evaluation of them for future improvements, and a Health Professions Day open to regional high school students to initiate them with the career and educational opportunities available in the health field.

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

a.       A diverse faculty, 25 % of faculty of department are female, recruited nation wide

b.      One faculty member physically handicapped, with his help we have identified problems with accessibility and corrected them to the point where the building is totally accessible

c.       Our curriculum addresses diversity in that many of the courses examine the historical and cultural circumstances that led to the current beliefs of science.

d.      Student needs have been met through the Disabilities Services unit of Student Academic Success Services, recent examples include a visually impaired student being provided with microscopes designed to meet his needs in biology courses in addition to visually impaired text books.

 

Social Sciences

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

Applied History

The mission of the Museum Studies program is to provide an introduction 
to the various aspects and a fundamental understanding of the museum 
profession. Through the study of museums, their practices, history, and 
philosophies, students are provided with a strong foundation for 
beginning their museum career exploration.

 

            Relationship

The Applied History/Museum Studies program is the only coursework of its type available at any level in the State of Nebraska. As such, we are contributing to the vitality of the region by giving students an opportunity to study and stay in the region that Chadron State serves. Offering this unique course allows Chadron State College to add to the diversity of the students and thus the region, by allowing them to explore a “non-traditional” career path. In the program of Applied History/Museum Studies, internships are required. This service to the region is helping to provide not only educational opportunities to our students, but also the staffing and expertise needed by many of the institutions in our region.

 

History

The mission of the history program is to engender an informed, critical, and articulate sense of the past, an appreciation for the diversity of the human experience, and an awareness of the role of tradition, people, and past events in shaping the present.  The two majors within the history program develop a variety of practical research and communication skills and provide a foundation for graduate work, teaching, archival and library services, the study of law, as well as careers in business and the professions.

 

Social Science

The mission of the social science program is to engender an informed, critical, and articulate sense of the past, an appreciation for the diversity of the human experience, and an understanding of economic, geographic, political, and social influences in American society and across the globe.  The social science major develops a variety of practical research and communication skills and provides a foundation for a career in teaching the social sciences.

 

Relationship

The History and Social Science mission statements relate in various ways to Chadron State College’s mission.  The history and social science programs strive to accomplish the following elements of the institution’s mission:

·        Promote global awareness and multicultural perspectives through investigating  global geography and the diversity of the human experience

·        Encourage free expression and exchange of ideas through engendering a critical sense of the past

·        Develop students’ higher-level learning and applied skills through developing of a variety of practical research and communication skills

·        Promote research and scholarship

·        And provide individualized career advising and guidance, in part, through preparing students for a variety of possible careers.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

Applied History

The mission statement for the Applied History/Museum Studies programs was recently revised. The previous versions of the statement are currently posted on both the Social Sciences web site and on the Sandoz Center web pages.

 

The Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center is currently in the process of updating its site. The new mission statement will be featured on the Applied History/Museum Studies page. The mission will also be printed in the next college bulletin.

 

History & Social Science

Campus and regional constituents will learn of our mission statement through posting them on the campus website and by having it published in the general bulletin.

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

Applied History

We currently do not have any graduates from the Applied History/Museum Studies program. However, our first graduates will be graduating in May 2006.

 

Many of the positions in museums that come available in the region are entry level or generalist positions. The Applied History/Museum Studies program works to be of service to the region by preparing graduates from this program to fill these positions. Instruction in the program is designed to give the student the skills needed for an entry level positions or a solid basis for graduate work.

 

Applied History/Museum Studies students add to the diversity and vitality of the region by educating upcoming professionals in the importance of caring for the history and diversity of the region in which they live. Without individuals trained in the care of past around them, that past – that diversity-- will be lost. Heritage tourism contributes to the vitality of the region in terms of the cultural and economic landscape. Applied History/Museum Studies graduates will help maintain that vitality by providing and maintaining the heritage tourism sites in our region.

 

History & Social Science

The following are three examples of how program learning outcomes correlate with the program mission statements and the College mission.  First of all, outcome #4 of the History program declares that “students will articulate and demonstrate with examples the contributions of major world civilizations to history and to state the relevance of these examples to the current world.”  This correlates well with the mission statement of the history program, wherein it states that students will gain “an appreciation for the diversity of the human experience, and an awareness of the role of tradition, people, and past events in shaping the present.”  This, in turn, corresponds with the College mission regarding promoting global awareness and multicultural perspectives.

 

Secondly, outcome #1 of the Geography minor states that “Geography minors will demonstrate in writing an ability to recognize and describe major concepts, language, and techniques of a general nature used by geographers and articulate the geographical relationships with other areas of study.”  This, clearly, alludes to the social science mission regarding developing an understanding of geography—and to the College’s mission concerning global awareness, multicultural perspectives, and “promoting interdisciplinary collaborations.”

 

A third example is from the American Indian Studies minor program, which is under the social science major program.  Outcome #1 of the AIS minor states that “students will compare and contrast American Indian societies and cultures.”  This statement relates to the mission of the social science program regarding the diversity of the human experience—and to the College mission concerning global awareness and multicultural perspectives.

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

Applied History

The Applied History program supports the College’s mission for diversity in several ways. In the Exhibit Design class (AHIS 331), students study the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) as it relates to exhibit planning and design. As part of their course, students navigate around campus on crutches, in wheelchairs, or blindfolded. This exercise is done to not only increase awareness of accessibility issues in designing exhibits and public spaces, but also to help increase awareness of disability issues as a whole. Students as part of this course are also required, as part of their group project, to design exhibit labels which are ADA compliant in terms of font, reading level, and visual contrast. Students in the Introduction to Museums class (AHIS 231) prepare presentations on international museum innovators from various time periods, interests, genders, and ethnicities.

 

History & Social Science

The history and social science programs contribute to the College mission for diversity.  Here are some specific examples. 

 

For instance, during fall semester 2005, students in Dr. Hyer’s History 430/530: History of the American Indian students had the opportunity to read and discuss Virginia Lautenschlager’s memoir, A History of Cuny Table.  This work, written by a lay historian, offered an intriguing view of the racial and social complexities inherent in the Cuny Table area of the Pine Ridge Reservation.  Students grasped the rich—and sometimes unexpected—history of Cuny Table and wrote a critique in which they related their thoughts regarding Lautenschager’s account.

 

Second, the White Buffalo Club is a club under the sponsorship of Social Science faculty which promotes Native American cultural awareness.  This club co-sponsored the Martin Luther King Walk on January 17, 2005 and helped assemble “Final Exam Survival Kits” for all Native students on campus in May 2005.  In addition, the club oversaw the 4th Annual Chadron State College Powwow in November 2005, which—thanks to the generous financial support from the diversity committee and administrators—was a tremendous success.  There were 350 people in attendance, including CSC students, members of Pine Ridge Job Corps, and Lakota from Chadron and Pine Ridge.  Local Lakota and those living on Pine Ridge offered many positive comments about the Powwow, especially the fry bread.  Members of the White Buffalo Club also attended the Denver Pow-wow on March 18-20, 2005.

 

Related to supporting the White Buffalo Club, Dr. Karen Enos and Dr. Joel Hyer organized two Native American Welcome Days at CSC in 2005—the first in April and the second in November.  During each event, between twenty and thirty-five prospective students from Pine Ridge High School, the Red Cloud Indian School, and other local schools heard about the college’s programs and financial aid, ate lunch in the cafeteria, took a campus tour, and interacted with current Native students.  These activities create bridges between the college and local Native populations.  They should result in more Native students at CSC and more members of the White Buffalo Club.

 

The Campus Historical Forum is a club sponsored by the History program.  Between April 28 and May 2, 2005, the CHF went to Calgary, Alberta, Canada.  On this trip, club members visited the Lewis and Clark Museum at Great Falls, Montana, the Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump Site (a World Heritage Site outside of Lethbridge, Alberta), and Calgary’s Chinatown.

 

History faculty have further demonstrated their commitment to diversity at CSC by offering field trips to diversity-related historical sites.  During 2005, faculty took classes to the following locations: the Museum of the Fur Trade, the Crazy Horse Memorial (near Custer, SD), the “Treaty Tree” (near Whitney), the Pine Ridge Reservation (including Wounded Knee and Red Cloud Indian School) and Fort Robinson State Park.  History faculty recognize that students learn much and appreciate the rich ethnic history associated with this region through visiting these sites.

 

Visual & Performing Arts

 

  1. Does your unit have a mission statement?   If so, please provide the statement and describe how it is related to the College mission.

 

Art

The Chadron State College Art Department provides a comprehensive course of study in the visual arts while preparing students for careers in Fine Arts Studio, Graphic Design or Art Education.  The program encourages personal and artistic growth in a student-centered learning environment and is dedicated to creating a classroom experience strong in the production of art, the knowledge of historical context, the use of critical thinking, and the understanding of aesthetics.  The department enriches life in the Western High Plains region by providing educational opportunities, research, service, and visual arts programs that contribute to the vitality and diversity of the region.

 

            Relationship

Our first sentence relates by providing educational opportunities for faculty and staff to develop curriculum, course work, and/or careers in three different fields of art, which provide an educational experience for people within our region and provide a service as well as bringing diversity to the region.  The second sentence relates directly to providing innovative and supportive learning opportunities for students of all levels of competency, merging proven and creative teaching and learning principles with evolving technology. It also keys into the integration acquisition, discovery and application of knowledge.  The last statement of our mission statement almost matches the college’s mission statement verbatim and serves as the primary focus in our statement’s relationship to the college’s statement.

 

Theatre

The mission of the Chadron State College Theatre Studies Program is to prepare students for professional and educational theatre through a comprehensive program of practical application of knowledge bases and skills as well as sound analytical and theoretical development.  Through a global perspective on theatre, its practices, and its history, students are provided the diversity necessary to their development as an individual and responsible member of a world society.


The course of study is designed to prepare the student for a career in theatre and to encourage personal and artistic growth in a student-centered environment that places an equal value on classroom study and practical application.  To this end, the program is dedicated to providing a classroom experience strong in historical, theoretical, and process oriented work combined with extensive practical opportunities in production in which students are encouraged and expected to play key roles as actors, designers, technicians, and directors.

 

Relationship

The Theatre mission statement relate in various ways to Chadron State College’s mission.  The program strives to accomplish the following elements of the institution’s mission:

·        Assume a leadership role in social and cultural development through public and touring performances

·        Promote multicultural perspective and regional relevance through performance and assignments from various cultural, regional, gay and feminist authors

·        Develop students’ higher-level learning and applied skills through developing of a variety of practical research and communication skills

·        Promote research and scholarship

·        And provide individualized career advising and guidance, in part, through preparing students for a variety of possible careers.

 

  1. How do campus and regional constituents learn of your unit’s mission?  By what means is it distributed?

 

Art

Our newly created mission statement will be placed in our brochures and on our web page.

 

Theatre

Catalogue, website, brochure

 

  1. Provide examples to illustrate the connection between unit goals and objectives or student learning outcomes and your unit mission and the mission of the College.

 

Art

Students will have the opportunity to explore, create, analyze and understand art.

This is covered in our mission statement and all syllabi under course objectives

Students will develop and enhance their artistic skills.

This is covered in all studio classes as part of their skill development objectives meaning they are learning to use materials, equipment, safety issues but also use the vocabulary and verbiage that goes with art. 

Students will gain knowledge of art through workshops, field trips, and gallery visits.

Field trips to ad agencies and design studios, area galleries and museums, art guild trips, workshops with visiting artists, the art department operates two full time galleries with approximately 18 shows a show both student and professional that the students are exposed to so they gain knowledge through that.

The Art discipline will create an atmosphere which encourages students to communicate their ideas and feelings about art

This is covered in critiques and art history through written papers.  In education through written papers that deal with curriculum development, meeting standards in public school education, general learning about aesthetics and through presentations and discussions with visiting artists, which helps them with their development as artists.  It also aids in articulation skills, which is one of general education’s main goals through written assignments, critiques, and presentations.

Students will experiment with new materials, procedures and technology.

Graphic Design and Printmaking and Painting faculty are always working with the latest innovations and also teach students how to access the evolving information and ideas.  Art faculty use development funds and personal research to stay abreast of new procedures, techniques, processes, materials, equipment, and industry trends.

Prospective teachers will become knowledgeable with methods and techniques used in art education.  

Our students take two courses in the Art Department directed specifically to education.  One is our Art for the Elementary Teacher class in which they learn everything from how to structure their classroom, how to create a lesson plan, how to create curriculum, how to plan a year’s education, and how to understand discipline based art education (which is the way art is taught in the public schools today and is a structured system of teaching art from kindergarten to high school).  They also learn how to deal with the public, whether it is putting on a student art exhibit that parents will attend, getting prepared for parent-teacher conferences, getting ideas put together to continue to promote and advance art education in the public schools, or accessing funding to keep the program alive.

Students will develop a professional portfolio and art exhibit.

In Graphic Design the classes are always geared toward the development of a portfolio that students are able to take with them to help get them a job.  We require art portfolios, resumes, and art statements.  We try to get them prepared with the basic materials to go job hunting so they are ready to enter the market place.  As seniors our students are required to generate an exhibit of their work.  They develop, gather the work, advertise, organize the opening, visit with the public, and even hang the art.

 

Theatre

Throughout the program students are required to demonstrate both knowledge and application competencies in all phases of theatre including performance, design, and technical work.  They are also required to participate in the mounting of each of four performances given annually as part of the outreach mission of both the college and theatre.  Their participation both in the classroom and the performance simulations provide the faculty with excellent assessment mechanisms for both competencies and knowledge. Students present a juried electronic portfolio upon graduation as well as performance and audition material. 

 

  1. Provide specific examples of how your unit supports the College mission for diversity in any of the following areas:  ADA, students, staff, constituents, and the region.

 

Art

We contribute to the diversity of the region by:

·        Bringing visiting artists in from all parts of the country to expose our students to many regions and ethnic groups which are new and different from them;

·        Providing outreach programs that include demonstrations and workshops; tours and lectures to our students and the people of our region;

·        Having our faculty serve as advisors and a resource to numerous organizations, schools, art clubs and professional consultants to our region;

·        Providing 18 – 20 art shows annually in a professional art gallery to members of our region.

·        Art Department faculty is very diverse:

                  2 males, 4 females

                  1 Native American

·        Art shows are selected based on a variety of artistic and cultural approaches to work

·        The history of art by various diverse groups is covered in all Art History classes and studio courses.

·        Art works hard to create as many cross-disciplinary classes with other areas of the campus.

·        All Art classrooms and buildings have been made fully handicapped accessible.

·        The Art faculty judge and critique many art shows, fairs, and school competitions.

·        Prior to the renovation of Memorial Hall, the faculty had long discussions with the architects regarding ADA compliance and safe working environment on a room by room criteria based upon the intended uses, accessibility issues and design features

·        Created two slide shows for recruitment.  One is aimed at a general audience about the art department interspersed with different artists and quotes, different backgrounds and cultures.  The other is all about Native American artists.  These will go on the road to schools where setting up a booth for recruitment.  These slide shows will play in the background.

 

Theatre

Theatre Department faculty is diverse:

                  2 males

                  1 Native American

 

We provide educational opportunities that promote global awareness and a multicultural perspective though our course offerings of:

            TH 336 and 337 Theatre History I & II

            TH 434 Advanced Acting (periods and styles)

            TH 235 Elements of Theatre

 

We ensure regional relevance by always targeting one of our four annual productions towards a topic of local significance and popularity.  We also promote touring shows ideal to the small town environment.  Our unit has worked closely in the past 7 years with American Horse School on the Pine Ridge reservation providing dramatic activities and presentations.  We have also formed a touring children’s theatre providing free performances to all regional elementary schools.

 

Theatre played an active role during the planning stages of Memorial Hall’s renovation by meeting with the architects and specifying the areas which would need full ADA accessibility such as the addition of wheelchair seating in the main theatre, a ramp to the makeup area and control room, etc.