License Your Work

When using an open license, you retain the copyright to your original work but give permission to others to copy and distribute your materials, provided they give you credit — and only on the conditions you specify. Whether you're creating a presentation, video, website, or software there are easy ways to add a license for these different formats.

Add the License

Once you choose a license, the next step is to display this license on your materials. Doing this ensures that people who use your material know how they can make use of it by easily following the terms specified in your selected license. The best method of showing your license varies by content type. Below are links to best practices for various types of media.

Creative Commons Licenses and Copyright

By default, you hold the copyright for any presentation, video, website, or software that you create. You don’t need to register or include a © symbol, copyright happens at the point of creation. Copyright is "all rights reserved," which means if someone wants to download or copy documents or other content from the material, they can’t distribute that content to anyone else without the expressed permission of the copyright holder. Creative Commons licenses allow the copyright holder to change “all rights reserved” to “some rights reserved.” The copyright holder retains copyright, but clearly identifies conditions under which the general public may use the content.

For Presentations, Documents, Multimedia, or Websites

If you want to license media you've created such as a presentation, video, or website, the Open.Michigan team recommends using one of the licenses provided by Creative Commons (CC). There are several CC licenses to choose from, including:
If you want to license media you've created such as a presentation, video, or website, the Open.Michigan team recommends using one of the licenses provided by Creative Commons (CC). There are several CC licenses to choose from, including: