Criterion Four:  Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge

 

Applied Sciences

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

Applied Sciences Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

1

3

5

17

0

5

11

9

2

23

6

0

1

0

5

1

9

2004

2

3

8

14

5

2

0

38

5

19

8

2

3

0

0

0

8

2003

6

7

6

3

0

4

0

25

0

21

5

1

3

0

4

0

6

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

Annually, the Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) faculty review the evaluations from students enrolled in the courses that are offered in the General Studies program.  Faculty review these student evaluations formally and determine if course outcomes were met.  Changes are implemented accordingly for the following year.  Outcomes and changes are integrated into the annual assessment report filed at the end of the year.

 

The General Studies course with which ITE offers is ITE-331 Humankind, Society and Technology.  In judging the effectiveness of the course, we are developing two tests which will be given to all the students taking the class.  Both the pre-test and post-test will ascertain the level of knowledge of the students concerning issues affecting the entire world.  Issues such as: the application of science and technology and the changes it has on societies worldwide; the impact of medical technology on humanity; the impact of environmental damage to the USA and the world and the causes of those changes; the role fossil fuel use has on our society; the changes brought about by information technology; the vulnerability of our society due to our reliance on technology that may fail; the changes needed to be made in society due to the emergence of transnational terrorism and the changing nature of our world due to globalization.  The testing will ascertain the level of understanding of our students with these issues when they enter the class and as the have completed the course.  Logically, we should see a greater understanding of these issues at the end of the course versus the start.

 

The Agriculture/Range Management unit only offers one General Studies course, International Food Policy, which is now taught by an adjunct in FCS due to the teaching overloads of the Agriculture faculty.

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

Outcomes are integrated into specific courses based on the evaluations from students, feedback from interdisciplinary programs (specifically faculty in Agriculture, Industrial Technology, Language Arts, Math and Science) and faculty, and overall expectations of the course.  Generally, individual faculty make changes in the expected learning outcomes, format, course content and evaluation process of the individual courses.

 

The Agriculture/Range Management unit only offers one General Studies course, International Food Policy, which is now taught by an adjunct in FCS due to the teaching overloads of the Agriculture faculty.

 

The Industrial Technology program has a strong applications orientation concerned specifically with the real world application of technology to industrial projects included in nearly all our courses.  ITE 331, Humankind, Society and Technology, has a central theme of understanding what technology and science is and how they are applied to our world with intended and unintended consequences.  There can be no better way to reinforce or illustrate this concept than in the direct application of technology to a required industrial problem.  The application of technology, whether it is successful or not, requires an understanding of the interactions of that bit of knowledge with the total

environment.  Living and working in the 21st century will be a series of understandings, accommodations and compromises between science, technology and societal factors.  Teaching students that theory and practice can be two different things, that what you think should be simple can be very difficult, that living with ambiguity and uncertainty will be required, and that a changing society will require changing competencies and skills is an important focus of the IT program and of ITE 331. 

 

Information gained from conversations with other faculty who teach the courses in the General Studies program offer valuable insight into specific changes that may occur in any one single course.

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

Yes, Family and Consumer Sciences faculty have made revisions to all courses taught in the General Studies program – Families in Society, Nutrition and Global Studies based on feedback from the annual review.

 

Though the Agriculture/Range Management program does not have an advisory board, the faculty receive constant feedback form their students and alumni that are directly involved in agriculture.  The faculty also bring in local producers and practitioners in production agriculture to provide direct input to the students.  The program prides itself in being an applied program.  Thus the faculty strive to keep in touch with the values of production agriculture/rangeland management and incorporate it into their program.

 

All courses taught in ITE are regularly updated, basing this on research of current literature and end of degree student interviews and assessments. As an example, computer aided drafting courses and the software used in these courses were updated based on industrial literature and student concerns with updating.

 

Business & Economics

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

Business & Economics Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

0

1

12

11

0

10

0

15

5

48

7

2

11

9

0

1

13

2004

3

2

11

13

0

14

1

32

2

38

6

10

5

1

1

0

11

2003

2

0

8

9

0

8

1

41

6

58

12

22

9

20

4

0

13

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

            ECON 130, Survey of Economics, and ECON 332, International Economics and Societies - These courses were designed, implemented and functioned based on the Philosophy of General Studies at Chadron State College and directly correlated to the Objectives of General Studies.  The specific student learning outcomes for these courses directly correlated to the General Studies Objectives (GSO).  The effectiveness has been based on:

a.       Pretest and posttest with comparative analysis completed for each component of these exams and the total scores,

b.      Each period exam was designed to correlate to the GSO with specific components’ focused on student learning outcome achievements and

c.       Course activities (problems, quizzes, presentations, stock market games and research) focused on student learning outcomes of the course and GSO.

           

            BA 331, Business Communications - This course was designed, implemented and functioned based on the Philosophy of General Studies at Chadron State College and directly correlated to the Objectives of General Studies.  The specific student learning outcomes for this course directly correlated to the General Studies Objectives (GSO).  The effectiveness has been based on:

a.       Each learning objective was designed to correlate with the Philosophy of General Studies including (1) communication focused on effective expression of ideas and information (with emphasis on reading, writing, speaking and information technology), and (2) social environment focused on individual and group interaction.

b.      Each learning objective was designed to correlate with the Objectives of General Studies including (1) accessing information and knowledge, critically reasoning, objectively analyzing and solving problems, (2) perceiving assumptions, constructing arguments, and using evidence to solve problems, and (3) developing written and oral communication to express, define, and answer questions about the world.

c.       Course activities (paper presentations of research, discussion, oral presentations, quizzes, and exams) and an additional end of course activity (portfolio development) focused on student learning outcomes of the course and GSO.

 

            BA 431 Professional Ethics—This course was designed implemented and functioned based on the Philosophy of General Studies at Chadron State College and directly correlated to the Objectives of General Studies.  The specific student learning outcomes for this course directly correlated to the General Studies Objectives (GSO).  The effectiveness has been based on:

a.       Each learning objective was designed to correlate with the Philosophy of General Studies including (1) social environment focused on individual and group interaction, structure and function of social institutions, and the cultural and technological development of past and present civilizations.

b.      Each learning objective was designed to correlate with the Objectives of General Studies including (1)critically reasoning, objectively analyzing and solving of problems, (2) perceiving assumptions, constructing arguments, and using evidence to solve problems, (3) developing and understanding personal values and the values of others, and (4) the ethical and moral implications of that knowledge.

c.       Course activities (journal writing, discussion, personal responses to discussion topics, presentations, and tests) focused on student learning outcomes of the course and GSO.

               

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

·         GS Objective #1—Assigned projects/cases assists students in objective analysis in problem solving

·         GS Objective #2—MIS course assists student in acquiring technological knowledge

·         GS Objective #6—MIS course assists student in acquiring relations of technological to all areas of business

·         GS Objective #7—All course offerings enhance student ability to understand personal values and values of others, ethically and morally

·         Students are required to work individually and in groups.

·         Present work in both written and verbal formats.

·         Research and other forms of academic discovery are encouraged.

·         Impacts of globalization and cultural integration are discussed.

·         Business and personal ethics are explored.

·         Economics has been recognized as a social science which has been dependent on the natural and physical sciences and the integration of General Studies into economics, agri-business, finance and marketing has been a natural flow.  Additionally, the integration of other social sciences, as well as the arts and communications, flow into courses and student learning outcomes.

·         Here are two examples of activities used in the classroom that help achieve the General Studies Objective.

a.       Class Debates:  Utilizes independent thinking, critical reasoning, objectively solving problems, constructing argument, and using evidence to justify their position.

b.      Hofstede's role playing activity.  (Different dimensions of national culture)  This activity provides students with a basic knowledge and appreciation of different cultures.

·         On-line periodical search for Internet literature reviews

·         Small group interaction—assignments and activities

·         Reflective writing

·         Journal writing

·         Critical thinking

·         Service learning projects—MIS course allows students to volunteer service to organizations locally and regionally (Wyoming, Colorado, North Platte, Nebraska)   

·         Communications

·         Simulated case studies culminating in both an oral and written presentation

·         Research-based writing assignments

·         Threaded discussions requiring background research, minimum of one topic related to diversity issues

·         Development of an e-commerce business as a culminating semester project

·         Active learning and discussion based classes (very limited lecture)

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

a.       SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) reflected a diverse society by hosting 120 rural students who came to Chadron State College to learn about the currency exchange for Black History Month.

b.      Use up-to-date texts which incorporate units in international related issues

c.       Courses taught integrate technology into course assignments

d.      Courses taught use technology-based delivery systems (Blackboard, ITV)

e.       Courses cover globalization, cultural diversity as a critical success factor in modern business organizations.

f.        Technology as a change agent and business support systems are discussed.

g.       Students regularly use technology in the classroom and in conducting “research.”

h.       Used Internet-based computer technology to instantly grade student homework and give feedback to the students

i.         Web enhanced all courses

j.        Examine the end-of-term course reviews prior to updating courses

k.      Include technology in both the presentation of material and in the required assignments

l.         Three courses now offered on-line at least every other year

m.     Offering more on-line courses each year

n.       MBA totally available on-line

 

Communication Arts

 

  1. What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

Communication Arts Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

0

0

3

3

1

0

0

2

1

7

5

1

8

3

2

1

4

2004

1

1

0

6

1

0

0

2

2

7

3

0

0

3

1

0

3

2003

0

0

1

3

1

0

0

1

5

5

5

0

0

8

1

0

3

 

 

  1. What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

  1. How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

The Language, Literature & Communication Arts (LLCA) department formed subcommittees in 2005-06 for each of our multi-sectional general studies offerings.  Our goal was to try to define some common student learning outcomes for each course that were broad enough so that each individual professor could tailor their course content to allow these outcomes to be assessed.  All assessment is currently course embedded, although this year each subcommittee has been meeting to develop an overall assessment strategy for each category of general studies courses, which will appear in the 2007-2009 CSC General Bulletin.

 

We have not identified an overall assessment plan for one sectional courses taught by the same individual professors in the “Global and Social Awareness” category.  Following are the current assessment strategies for Ethics, Patterns in the Humanities, Composition (I and II), Elements of Literature, Introduction to Philosophy, and general studies courses in Communication Arts.

 

Communication Arts Options

Every syllabus for each course offered in this option will include the following:

 

General Studies Objectives (paraphrased):

 

Communication Art General Studies Course Specific Student Learning Outcomes

 

CA 125 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

 

Student Learning Outcomes:

Students with college level reading comprehension and composition skills who read all assignments, complete all written work, study two hour for each hour of class, and seek individual assistance from the instructor will be able to employ the skills to:

1.      Identify key components of perception of self and perception of others;

2.      Demonstrate ethical awareness and sensitivity in public speaking and interpersonal communication;

3.      Develop effective listening skills for situations in public address, interpersonal and small group communication;

4.      Describe conflict and effective methods for resolving conflict;

5.      Develop and deliver effective speeches;

6.      Identify key components of working in small groups;

7.      Describe issues of diversity and culture in communication settings, and

8.      Understand how to conduct an informational interview.

 

We have recently made changes in the CA 125 Fundamentals of Oral Communication outcomes to more accurately reflect the course content and materials.

1.      Gather and evaluate materials.

2.      Develop and deliver effective speeches.

3.      Understand effective listening skills for situations in public address, interpersonal and small group communication.

4.      Understand the impact of diversity on communication interactions.

5.      Identify the key components of communication in interpersonal, small group, interviewing and public address settings.

 

We hope to do this with each General Studies course now that we have overall categorical objectives and performance criteria.

 

CA 225: Interpersonal & Small Group Communication (this has been changed and will be updated to CA 130 with new outcomes)

 

Student Learning Outcomes:

Students with college level reading comprehension and composition skills who read all assignments, complete all written work, study two hour for each hour of class, and seek individual assistance from the instructor by the end of the course will be able to:

1.      Understand the opportunities and responsibilities in taking roles and sharing leadership in groups and teams;

2.      Develop knowledge and skill in verbal, nonverbal listening and questioning communication in group/teams and in interpersonal communication;

3.      Develop knowledge and skills in managing problems that groups and teams experience with members, leaders, and organizations;

4.      Know the importance of ethics and diversity in groups/teams and interpersonal relationships;

5.      Develop knowledge and skill in problem-analysis and decision-making processes in teams;

6.      Develop understanding of how we arrive at the concept of self and influences on that perception, and

7.      Develop an understanding of how interpersonal relationships are formed in family, friendships, and romantic relationships.

 

CA 230: Conflict Resolution and Mediation

 

Student Learning Outcomes:

Students with college level reading comprehension and composition skills who read all assignments, complete all written work, study two hour for each hour of class, and seek individual assistance from the instructor by the end of the course will be able to:

1.      Discuss the components of the definition of conflict;

2.      Assess their current conflict style for work and for home and examine the appropriateness of their responses to conflict;

3.      Write a conflict analysis for a personal conflict;

4.      Summarize in writing their daily conflict experiences and responses during a specifies amount of time;

5.      Analyze their responses to the conflicts they recorded;

6.      Respond to case studies using appropriate current research in conflict mediation and resolution;

7.      Explain and critique an existing conflict resolution program that is used in either the workplace or home, and

8.      Explain how or why their personal view of conflict has changed.

 

CA 233: Multimedia and Presentation Speaking

 

Student Learning Outcomes:

Students with college level reading comprehension and composition skills who read all assignments, complete all written work, study two hour for each hour of class, and seek individual assistance from the instructor by the end of the course will be able to:

1.      Prepare and present an informative, persuasive speech using some form of multimedia;

2.      Synthesize material appropriate to the subject and audience;

3.      Explain when multimedia is used in a presentation and how to choose appropriate media, and

4.      Evaluate a presentation for format, content, and presentation style.

 

We need to include the CA 225 Groups and Team Communication

Outcomes to follow

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

No response

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

Diversity is a key theme in communication.  Every course in Human Communication and Public Relations deals with issues of diversity.  Communication in general needs to be specific to a target audience.  If communicators choose to ignore a target audience then the communication is pointless.  Messages need to be structured for maximum effectiveness both in public address and interpersonal communication. Students also need to know how to analyze and break apart messages in interpersonal communication, and mass produced materials.  As a department we strive to make this a focus in all courses.

 

Communication Arts faculty also recognize the need for our students to be participants in a global society.  Faculty members had discussions over the past year on how to expose our students, predominantly from rural America, to global issues.  We have discussed field trips overseas, finding international internship opportunities and the possibility of trying to partner with Communication students overseas for some kind of exchange.  These are just ideas that we hope we can integrate into our program. 

 

PR students were provided with an opportunity to present their projects from the 2006-07 academic year at the Central States Communication Association Conference.  The participants mingled with students from other states and had an opportunity to present at a professional conference as undergraduates.  This is an activity the faculty would like to continue to promote and expand to include students from the options in Communication and Journalism.

 

Faculty members also know the importance of technology for students.  We can now expose them to more diverse issues and images through the use of the Web in mediated classrooms.  We can also teach them the theory and skills for communicating in a global society.

 

As we explore these changes in our programs we have first gone to our professional contacts and friends to seek opportunities.  Discussion has also focused on how to fund opportunities for our students. 

 

 

Counseling, Psychology & Social Work

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

Counseling, Psychology & Social Work Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

1

1

13

10

0

1

0

6

8

11

3

2

9

13

2

0

7

2004

2

0

4

8

0

3

0

5

9

12

3

1

7

7

0

0

5

2003

0

0

0

7

0

3

0

1

2

12

2

5

4

9

1

0

4

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

The graduate Counseling program does not have any general studies classes.

 

At the current time the Psychology program has one general studies class: Culture and Psychology (PSYC 421).  The effectiveness of this class has been assessed though essay format exams, a group presentation about another culture, and a joint paper related to the group presentation.

 

Until recently there have not been well-defined learning outcomes for this area in General Studies and little coordination of class assessment with General Studies Learning outcomes. The information below is from the 2005-2007 General Bulletin and is closely related to the cultural content of the course.

o.      Encourages students to explore the social environment, including individual and group interaction, the structure and function of social institutions, and the historical, cultural, and technological development of past and present civilizations.

More specific learning outcomes and objectives related to Global and Social Awareness General Studies are under development for the new General Bulletin.

 

For the 2007-2009 catalog the student learning outcome for Global and Social Awareness is

 

·        Students will understand and be sensitive to cultural diversity and attain knowledge of and appreciation for various cultures and societies.

 

The performance criteria for this learning outcome are

 

·        Students will demonstrate understanding of the values and lifestyles of various cultures

·        Students will demonstrate understanding of the contributions of various cultures to the human enterprise

·        Students will demonstrate understanding and knowledge of human behavior in different spatial or temporal or institutional contexts.

 

Most recent versions of Psych 421 have addressed these questions through a combination of exams and writing assignments.

 

The Social Work Program does not teach General Studies Courses.

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

The stated objectives of General Studies in the 2005-2007 Catalog are to:

·        Assist the student in developing abilities to independently gain access to information and knowledge, critically reason, objectively analyze and solve problem, creatively think, perceive assumptions, construct arguments, use evidence, and perceptively listen and observe;

·        Assist the student in acquiring basic knowledge of our social environment (including technological aspects), of the humanities and the arts, and of the natural sciences;

·        Assist the student in developing proficiency in written and oral communication and in the language and symbols of mathematics, including the ability to understand mathematics as a language in which to express, define, and answer questions about the world;

·        Provide the student with a basic knowledge, understanding, and appreciation for the various cultures and societies in the world;

·        Produce positive changes in the student through the knowledge of personal health habits and physical activities which enhance the personal living environment;

·        Assist the student in the ability to integrate and establish meaningful relationships between disciplines or bodies of knowledge;

·        Enhance the ability of the student to understand personal values and the values of others and the ethical and moral implications of that knowledge; and

·        Enable the student to develop a level of maturity and proficiency in a field of knowledge.

 

All courses in the graduate Counseling and Psychology program address most of these objectives. “Developing abilities to independently gain access to information and knowledge, critically reason, objectively analyze and solve problem, and creatively think….” is an essential aspect of the entire counseling program.

 

The social environment and the technological aspects of the social environment are addressed in several Counseling classes as well. Specific courses addressing the social environment include Treatment Issues and Addictions; Ethical and Legal Issues; Multicultural Counseling; and Family Counseling. In terms of the technological aspects of the social environment, students are guided to responsible use of technology. Many classes require use of the library, electronic databases, and the Internet. Many classes are completely online (Consultation and Program Development; Family Counseling, Advanced Developmental Psychology; School Counseling; and Multicultural Counseling).  In the Psychology program the specific courses addressing the social environment include Culture and Psychology, Social Psychology and Organizational Behavior. The social environment is also addressed in courses such as Theories of personality and Theories and perspectives of abnormal behavior. In terms of the technological aspects of the social environment, students are guided to responsible use of technology. Many classes require use of the library and electronic databases; nearly all classes include the use of the Internet and are web-enhanced in the sense that they use Blackboard to deliver some course material.

 

Many Counseling classes require written and oral communication. Online classes require written communication through discussion board assignments. Other graduate Counseling courses require brief papers or longer literature reviews. Oral communication occurs in class discussions and in formal group presentations.

Additionally, many psychology classes include a component in both written and oral communication. Written communication may be in the form of essay exams, discussion board assignments, short position papers, or longer literature or research papers. Oral communication may occur in class discussions, or in more formal individual or group presentations. In PSYC 432, students are required to develop and complete a formal paper, as well as a presentation on a research project. In terms of the use of mathematical symbols and language, students in psychology are required to learn about statistical methods for making decisions about collected data, which requires a basic knowledge of math, but extend this into a specialized field.

 

Students learn about cultural and societal differences in the Multicultural Counseling class.  Textbook choices for all Counseling classes reflect a growing awareness of the importance of diversity. The Multicultural Counseling class includes information about differences between individuals and cultures in terms of values.  Students learn about cultural and societal differences across the Psychology curriculum. Textbook choices reflect a growing awareness of the importance of diversity. In addition, classes such as Psych 421 focus on the issue of cultural diversity.

 

In terms of personal health habits, these are addressed to some degree in the developmental psychology classes, in terms of relationship to health. In addition, mental health and methods of coping with stress are addressed in several courses, including Abnormal Psychology and General Psychology.

 

Psychology has developed as a field in relation to many other areas, including computer science, biology, and linguistics. In addition, it has potential applications in almost any field, including business, criminal justice, education, and so forth.

 

Classes in social psychology, personality, and culture and psychology include some information about differences between individuals and cultures in terms of values.

 

The Social Work Program has specified non-social work courses required prior to admission to the Professional Program.  In addition, courses are recommended to students as electives based on their area of interest in Social Work.  The Social Work Program identifies the General Studies Requirements as essential to the liberal arts background and personal development needed by students prior to moving into the Professional Social Work Program. It is important students have gained necessary skills in critical thinking, ethical reasoning and personal growth while completing General Studies in order to succeed in the Social Work Comprehensive Major.  General Studies Courses provide the foundation in reading, composition, the humanities, human biology and social sciences upon which the advanced curriculum is based. Students who have completed Associate of Arts degrees from a regionally accredited institution will have met all General Studies requirements except the six hours of upper-division general studies requirements in global and ethics studies. Completion of specific lower level courses may also be required in individual degree programs.

 

1.      Through composition & speech generals students focus upon learning how to express ideas and share information through skills in reading, writing, and speaking. As a foundation for social work courses, these communication skills are essential for students to engage in interviewing, relationship building, policy advocacy, collegial-working relationships, and argumentation. Professional Social Work Methods courses emphasize professional use of self as well as oral and written communication. Written and oral communication is a skill for enhancing self-awareness. Research Methods & Lab and Policy Analysis & Advocacy courses require students who can generate reports that are professionally written and who can articulate clearly the meaning and content of their messages. Through all the professional courses, students are encouraged to build upon their knowledge and ability to give voice, not only to their ideas, but also to the conditions and experiences of those who are without voices in society.

2.      Through science and math generals students learn basics of how to critically reason, think analytically, objectively analyze and solve problems, perceive assumptions, use evidence, and perceptively listen and observe. Students focus on the scientific method of inquiry, basic scientific principles, the relationship of science and humanity, and the future challenges and opportunities for science and society. Students gain knowledge about the physical and biological environment and are exposed to realities that are seen and unseen. Students acquire knowledge of the human organism as multiple systems interacting with the social and physical environment. The ability to think critically, think analytically, perceive assumptions, and use evidence is basic skills that are further developed throughout the social work program. SW Research Methods assumes students have acquired these basic skills. Professional social work methods courses assume students have a primary understanding of human systems interacting with the physical, biological, and social environment and that students can solve problems, identify assumptions, and use evidence to support arguments.

3.      Through humanities and fine arts generals students learn to creatively think, to appreciate the meanings and diversity of human experience and expression, to identify patterns and structures in human creation, to give structure to ambiguity, and to explore human values. Creative thinking, creating structures, appreciating meanings, and understanding diversity are fundamental knowledge and skills for professional social work courses. Creative processes are essential for understanding the expressive nature of and interventions with individuals, families, organizations, and communities. The capacities to ask questions, seek information, and to synthesize that information into understandings that guide professional actions are fundamental to generalist lab, research methods, methods courses, policy analysis, integrative seminar, and eventually field practicum.

4.      Through government and history generals, students acquire the knowledge and understanding of the evolution of human societies, of the role of individual and group actions in shaping social history, of the influence of power and authority in creating historical accounts, of the nature and struggle of humanity in interaction with natural and socially constructed epochs. Students acquire a basic knowledge of the structures and processes of the US government. Social Work and social welfare history builds upon general understandings of US government and history with regard to the relationship of past to present and future. In Social Policy Analysis and Advocacy students utilize and understanding of political processes and historical analyses in shaping policy interpretations, in developing assessments of possible alternative actions, and in selecting targets and forms of policy analysis. In Methods courses, social work students use knowledge of historical reasoning with work with individual clients, groups, organizations, and communities to conduct assessments, for goal planning, and choices of interventions.

5.      Through global and social awareness generals, students obtain a basic knowledge, understanding, and appreciation for various cultures and societies in the world. Students discover diversity in lifestyles, cultures, and social institutions. Students acquire a beginning understanding of the inter-relationships of the economic and social policies between world societies. In social welfare history and service delivery systems students build upon the inter-relationships of economic and social policies between world societies. In Methods and Diversity courses students further develop an appreciation of the nature and extent of human diversity within the context of social work knowledge, values, and skills.

6.      Through reasoning and values, students develop the ability to understand personal values and the values of others and the ethical and moral implications of that knowledge. Student ability to reason and exploration of personal and other values, combined with ethical issues is expanded throughout all social work courses. In pre-requisite social work courses students take value positions on current issues, write narratives on personal positions, role play opinions reflecting values of others, seek to understand the impact of chronological context on value choices and subsequent public policies. In the research course and research lab, students build on an understanding of how values effect the nature of research, selection of samples, interpretation of data, and the questions asked. In addition, students explore ethical issues involved in conducting research. Through the methods courses student continue to expand on reaching logical conclusions, using empirical information, identifying value influences on problem definitions, goal setting, and the selection of interventions.

7.      Through health/wellness and physical education, students explore ways of maintaining physical and mental health, both as individuals and in the society as a whole, and to recognize the importance of these attitudes for intellectual development and a sense of well-being. Students are encouraged to reflect positive personal changes by acquiring knowledge of personal health habits and physical activities which enhance the personal living environment. Generals in health/wellness and physical education affirm the importance and challenge for students to effect personal changes. They provide a broader understanding of one part of the integration of body, mind, and spirit. The relevance of nutrition and wellness are themes throughout social work courses in human growth and development, social work with individuals, couples, families, organizations, and communities.

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

The Multicultural Counseling class has been updated to reflect diversity in the Counseling profession. Diversity issues are also discussed in Treatments Issues in Addictions. Many classes are offered online and most use online technology as part of the delivery methodology. The Counseling program does not have an external advisory board. One of the assessments of the graduate Counseling program is the Graduate Orals Examination which all graduate students must complete as part of their culminating experiences before graduation.

During this Graduate Orals Examination, students are asked questions about their knowledge and experiences working with clients from diverse gender and cultural or ethnic backgrounds.  Students are also asked about working with clients from diverse cultural or ethnic backgrounds who have concurrent substance abuse problems. Students taking these classes in an online format discuss these issues with the faculty member and other students in a discussion board format where they read questions, post written responses to the question, read posts of other students, and respond to other students’ comments.   

 

The annual review of the graduate Counseling program is determined by the results of students scores on the Graduate Orals examination as well as the other graduate student assessments (pre-test survey, post-test survey,  Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination, Counseling Portfolio Rubric, Orals Rating Instrument, and the National Counseling Exam).

 

Psychology

The Psychology program does not have an external advisory board, or a formal annual review process. However, it makes extensive use of resources provided by external organizations such as the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. In addition, departmental meetings often address issues that lead to increased focus on technology and diversity through shared information from other campus units regarding enrollment, needs from extended campus sites, and so forth. Yearly reports prepared for administrative purposes often require the program to address issues of diversity (e.g. Diversity Reports prepared by departments), and issues of enrollment, program viability and technology needs.

 

All Psychology courses have been updated to reflect diversity. Several sources of information were used in making the decisions regarding diversity. The American Psychological Association includes diversity as one of the primary learning goals for undergraduate psychology programs (Goal 8. Sociocultural and International Awareness), thus the process of considering learning goals and program objectives for catalog revisions was important in making these updates. The American Psychological Association has also developed a bibliography of resources on diversity http://www.apa.org/ed/biblio.html.

 

Information from students also was part of this process. Students in lower level psychology classes often expressed ideas and opinions that suggested a need for more attention to cultural issues and diversity.

 

The assessment process in psychology does not include standardized measurement of knowledge related to diversity. In some cases, values and opinions of students are difficult to impact and to measure, but increasing awareness is part of the process. The American Psychological Association suggests that individual projects and collaboration are potentially the best ways to assess this learning goal. http://www.apa.org/ed/overview_optimal.html There is potential to embed some assessment of diversity issues in writing assignments in Psych 421 Culture and Psychology.

 

In addition, all courses are offered as online courses, and most courses use online technology as part of the delivery. One of the primary reasons for this development was through information provided to the department from other campus sources, such as Extended Campus. There is an increasing demand from students at surrounding community colleges and in more remote regions for online courses and programs. Typically this information was shared in departmental meetings. Shared enrollment data also played a role in this development.

 

This use of online delivery systems allows the department to reach a wider range of students. Students take classes from a number of remote locations and for a number of reasons. A typical summer class may include a higher proportion of working individuals, especially teachers, and many non-traditional students. In addition, many online classes may be more attractive to students from other cultures. The increased use of online courses reflects increased access to and need of technological skills and facilities on the part of both students and faculty.

 

Other areas in which technology needs have driven change is in considering how to facilitate student understanding of statistics and student use of statistical software. The Counseling, Psychology and Social Work Department has purchased a SmartBoard, and other equipment which will allow faculty to develop and share electronic files related to statistics more easily for online students. Statistical software has been moved to a location in which it will be available more often for on campus students, and considering the needs for online students is still in progress. (Options might include requiring off campus students to use different software or to purchase a student version of the software).

 

The Council on Social Work Education Accreditation Standards outlines the purposes of Social Work Education as follows:
The purposes of social work education are to prepare competent and effective professionals, to develop social work knowledge, and to provide leadership in the development of service delivery systems. Social work education is grounded in the profession’s history, purposes, and philosophy and is based on a body of knowledge, values, and skills. Social work education enables students to integrate the knowledge, values, and skills of the social work profession for competent practice.

To achieve these purposes Social Work Programs are expected to be engaged in:

·        Providing curricula and teaching practices at the forefront of the new and changing knowledge base of social work and related disciplines.

·        Providing curricula that build on a liberal arts perspective to promote breadth of  knowledge, critical thinking, and communication skills.

·        Developing knowledge.

·        Developing and applying instructional and practice-relevant technology.

·        Maintaining reciprocal relationships with social work practitioners, groups, organizations, and communities.

·        Promoting continual professional development of students, faculty, and practitioners.

·        Promoting inter-professional and interdisciplinary collaboration.

·        Preparing social workers to engage in prevention activities that promote well-being.

·        Preparing social workers to practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

·        Preparing social workers to evaluate the processes and effectiveness of practice.

·        Preparing social workers to practice without discrimination, with respect, and with knowledge and skills related to clients’ age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.

·        Preparing social workers to alleviate poverty, oppression, and other forms of social injustice.

·        Preparing social workers to recognize the global context of social work practice.

·        Preparing social workers to formulate and influence social policies and social work services in diverse political contexts.

 

(Excerpts from Council on Social Work Education, Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards, 2001, Council on Social Work Education, Inc.)

 

Within the provision of Social work Education, Social Work Programs are to integrate key concepts both vertically and horizontally across the curriculum. These concepts include the value of diversity, individuals and relationships. Inherent in this concept are the global interconnectedness of all peoples, the need for social and economic justice, and the importance of taking a global view of the human condition.

 

Examples of the integration of these concepts in the Social Work program at CSC include discussion of sustainable agriculture, political impacts on governmental policy, immigration, assimilation by ethnic populations in America, attempts to force assimilation on Native Americans, genocide of native peoples and Jews, religious persecution, international social work as a field of practice, etc. The Program has developed both horizontal and vertical integration charts and modified syllabi and course content where a need for further integration was noted.

 

In the process of curriculum re-development, the Social Work Program has moved students to more extensive use of Blackboard Discussions, electronic submission of papers by students, research and analysis of research data through the use of computerized statistical analysis. 

 

 

 

 

Education

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

Education Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

6

4

10

36

0

2

0

7

18

28

11

4

17

26

1

2

11

2004

7

3

10

20

0

5

0

16

27

29

7

3

27

36

1

0

11

2003

3

2

15

19

0

2

0

23

22

34

4

4

22

36

3

0

9

 

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

The Education Department is not involved with the delivery of any General Studies program courses.

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

The Education Unit conceptual framework knowledge base, “Developing Visionary Leaders for Lifelong Learning”, is aligned with, and supports, the General Studies (G.S.) curricular learning outcomes.  There are six undergirding components of the Visionary Leader Model: Assessment, Human Relations/Multicultural, Methodology/Technology, Professionalism, Communication and Thinking Skills.  Each of these six components is infused into the professional studies (education) course curriculum.

 

As an example, the G.S. outcome of “assisting the student in developing proficiency in written and oral communication…” is supported in its alignment to the Visionary Leader component of Communication.  This outcome is integrated into all professional studies courses.  Other examples of G.S. learning outcomes supported within the Education Unit are:

• Knowledge and use of technology (Methodology/Technology)

• Access to knowledge and information and to think critically about it (Thinking Skills);

• Demonstrate a respect and appreciation for our social environment and for various cultures and societies in the world (Human Relations/Multicultural)

• Demonstrate understanding and respect for personal and ethical values

   (Professionalism, Human Relations/Multicultural)

 

In addition, the Education Unit requires the following two courses of all students, both of which reflect support for the G.S. learning outcomes:  EDUC 224: Multimedia for Instruction and Learning and EDUC 415: Human Relations/Multicultural Education.

 

Two field experience activities are also required of all students completing our education program: O & P Multicultural Field Experience during EDUC 300/320: Observation and Participation; and Pine Ridge Reservation Multicultural Field Experience (during the Professional Semester).

 

The Unit hosts the Region 1 Special Olympics competition held on campus each April.

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

The Education Unit is committed to providing courses with content material reflective of a diverse and multicultural environment. Texts are reviewed regularly for bias and content reflective of our society.  Syllabi are updated to include these additions.  Students are required to participate in the two multicultural field experience described above in question number 4.  This senior level multicultural field experience to Pine Ridge Indian Reservation schools is continually modified on a yearly basis to better reflect the changing needs within Reservation schools. In addition, the Unit has instituted a junior level multicultural field experience where preservice students visit and observe classrooms in schools with predominant Hispanic populations.  This Hispanic field experience takes place during candidates EDUC 300/320: Observation and Participation course. 

 

 

 

 

English & Humanities

 

  1. What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

English and Humanities Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

7

4

7

10

10

8

1

3

0

23

11

64

15

22

52

2

13

2004

1

1

8

18

7

13

0

12

4

25

7

41

38

18

31

0

11

2003

2

0

6

16

20

7

0

12

4

30

4

19

20

28

23

0

11

 

  1. What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

  1. How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

The English program formed subcommittees last year for each of our multi-sectional general studies offerings.  Our goal was to try to define some common student learning outcomes for each course that were broad enough so that each individual professor could tailor their course content to allow these outcomes to be assessed.  All assessment is currently course embedded, although this year each subcommittee has been meeting to develop an overall assessment strategy for each category of general studies courses, which will appear in the 2007-2009 CSC General Bulletin.

 

Composition (I and II) and Elements of Literature.

 

ENG 135 and ENG 136 Composition I and II

Every syllabus will read as follows:

 

Student Learning Outcome: Students will discover, express, and advocate ideas clearly and effectively in Standard Edited English.

 

Performance Criteria:

 

Performance Criterion 1.     Students will conduct research as a series of tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate sources.

 

Performance Criterion 2.     Students will compose essays using processes that involve invention, revision, and editing.

 

Performance Criterion 3.     Students will read, evaluate, and use sources critically and analytically.

 

Performance Criterion 4.     Students will follow conventions of Standard Edited English in finished compositions.

 

Specifically, faculty will assess the following skills:

 

Rhetorical Matters

 

Students should:

1.      Write with a purpose;

2.      Respond to the needs of different audiences;

3.      Respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations;

4.      Use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation, and

5.      Adopt an appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality.

 

Critical Thinking, Reading, and The Writing Process

 

Students should:

1.      Use writing and reading for inquiry, learning, thinking, and communicating;

2.      Understand a writing assignment as a series of tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources;

3.      Integrate their own ideas with those of others, and

4.      Construct logical arguments based on reliable evidence.

 

Knowledge of Conventions

 

Students should:

1.      Express their ideas in standard, edited American English free from grammatical and mechanical errors, and

2.      Practice appropriate means of documenting their work.

 

ENG 233 Elements of Literature

Every syllabus will read as follows:

 

Students will experience the fine arts and develop critical understanding and appreciation of those arts.

 

Performance Criteria:

 

1.  Students will demonstrate a mastery of the technical language of literature.

 

2.  Students will demonstrate an understanding of what features of literature make it successful.

 

3.      Students will be able to use their knowledge of the features and language of literature to evaluate various literary works.

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

We don’t currently have a strategy for this, nor do we see the need for one.  All of our non-G.S. courses are designed to meet the college’s mission and program goals

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

ENG World Literature currently includes an entire unit on Jared Diamond’s book Guns, Germs, and Steel, a book that globally traces the effects of technology on different cultures throughout history.  This modification is too new to have been evaluated for program review.

 

 

 

Health, Physical Education & Recreation

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

HPER Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

1

0

1

4

0

0

0

1

4

14

8

6

3

12

0

0

6

2004

1

0

1

4

0

0

0

2

3

13

5

3

3

12

0

0

6

2003

1

0

0

2

0

0

0

6

3

20

1

5

8

19

0

0

5

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

HPER courses are aligned with the objectives of the general studies curriculum. 

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

Specific course objectives in the HPER curriculum reflect the overall objectives of the general studies program.  Diversity, cross-curricular, and global impacts relative to Health, Physical Education, and Recreation are evident in syllabi.

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

The HPER department has reviewed and selected new textbooks which reflect a changing society.  On-line course have been developed and implemented to reach technological needs of students.

 

Justice Studies

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

Justice Studies Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

2

1

3

12

0

1

1

0

0

18

4

5

8

23

14

2

5

2004

2

1

0

7

1

7

1

0

0

12

1

11

11

29

2

0

4

2003

0

0

1

19

0

1

1

4

0

13

4

20

10

31

4

0

4

 

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

                       

            See Above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

Justice Studies does not generally play a role in the General Studies program.  Still, Justice Studies faculty teach one General Studies class. This class is SS 323 Law and Society.  The faculty member who teaches that class has revised the student learning outcomes of the course to align with the revised General Education and Social, Cultural and Global Area Goals and Objectives.  A grid was also developed to illustrate where concepts related to the goals and objectives are introduced and developed.

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

The Justice Studies Assessment Plan does not specifically reference or assess learning outcomes of General Studies.  Still, there is common ground between the Justice Studies student learning outcomes and the General Education student learning outcomes.  For example, Justice Studies certainly introduces and develops the General Education objective of helping students to "recognize and understand the institutions and processes of society."  Perhaps Justice Studies can develop a grid (as a complement to and a part of Justice Studies' Assessment Plan) that indicates where General Education outcomes are introduced and developed.

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

Justice Studies courses and services are updated annually.  In part, these updates reflect an understanding that students will be working in a more global, diverse, and technologically fluent society.  A sample of these updates include:

 

·         An increased emphasis on computer based research.

·         An increased emphasis on multicultural context in most CJ courses.

·         An increased emphasis on theory and research through the CJ/LS Honors courses and Vision 2011 projects.

·         A continued emphasis on comparative and global perspectives in law and criminal justice.

·         An increased use of technology in the classroom.  For example, Justice Studies is pioneering the use of an interactive student response system at CSC (i.e. student use of technology).  Justice Studies has dedicated a newly renovated classroom to forensic investigations

 

One would hope that this type of change does not occur simply for the sake of change.  Rather, department members pay particular attention to current events, changes, trends, and developments in their field.  They actively participate in national associations in the field.  They conduct research in their field.  They participate on boards and agencies that are active in shaping policy in their field.  Department members review the program with this background of knowledge and experience. Annually, they evaluate whether the program and its courses are current and respond accordingly.

 

Library Media Program

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

            Vision 2011 has not supported any of these professional development activities.

 

Technology Training:

A Blackboard Training                          3 participants                2003-04

B. Computer Services Training:                         7 participants                2005-06

C. Computer Labs                                            5 participants                2005-06

D. RefWorks                                                    7 participants                2005-06

E. MYCSC Portal                                            8 participants                2005-06

F. Innovative Interfaces Training                        5 participants                2003-04

 

Workshops/Meetings:

A. Nebraska Library Association                      1 participant                 2002-03

                                                                  1 participant                 2005-06

B. NLC Database Road Show                         2 participants                2003-04

                                                                        1 participant                 2005-06

C. Panhandle Library System                1 participant                 2003-04

D. College of DuPage Teleconferences 1 participant                 2002-03

                                                                  1 participant                 2003-04

                                                                  4 participants                2004-05

                                                                  4 participants                2005-06

E. NLC/OCLC WebCasts       5 webcasts       1 participant for each 2004-05

                                                4 webcasts       1 participant for each 2005-06

 

 

2.      What scholarly activities, including the taking of courses at the college, have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

A.     Presentations: “Engaging Your Community:  Library as Place,” (Moderator and Organizer), Charleston Conference, November 2005, by Milton T. Wolf.

B.     Publication: “Whither the Book: Stunting the Tree of Knowledge?” in Charleston Conference Proceedings 2004, eds. Bazirjian, Vicky Speck and Bernhardt, Beth R. (Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited, Spring 2006), pp. 137-140, by Milton T. Wolf.

C.     Graduate Academic Certificate in Advanced Library Management from the University of North Texas. December 2005, received by James Britsch.

D.     Cataloging Consultant for Crawford Public Library Nebraska Memories Project, Sally Zahn June 2005-June 2006.

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

Not applicable

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

Not applicable

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

The classes in the Library Media Program use updated textbooks which integrate technology with materials online and on CD-ROM and highlight the use of technology in library functions.  Library classes are taught online using Blackboard

 

The decision to offer our program totally online was made during a meeting with Steve Taylor, Assistant Vice President for Extended Campus Programs, during the summer of 2003.  The Library Program had very small enrollment in the classes. In evaluating the options of dropping the Program or to offer it totally online it was decide to offer it online.

 

Mathematical Sciences

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

Mathematical Sciences Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

0

0

0

5

0

2

0

3

4

15

1

0

1

4

1

1

7

2004

0

0

0

4

0

1

0

2

6

18

2

0

1

4

0

1

8

2003

1

0

2

3

0

1

0

10

2

15

4

0

3

0

1

1

5

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

The goal of Mathematics in the general studies program is “Develop quantitative and logical reasoning abilities needed in all disciplines, the workplace, and for informed citizenship.”

 

General Studies Learning Outcomes for the Goal listed above:

Students will:

1.      Communicate quantitative ideas using mathematical terminology.

2.      Demonstrate skill manipulating mathematical expressions.

3.      Collect, organize, and analyze data.

4.      Model and solve problems mathematically.

 

Not all courses in the general studies value-added matrix will meet all General Studies Program Learning Outcomes equally.   However, a matrix of Courses listed in the general studies matrix versus general studies Learning Outcomes is to be consulted by faculty in constructing Course Learning Outcomes and in assessing achievement of the general studies Program Learning Outcomes.  All courses meet each outcome, but only significant work in an outcome area is marked in the matrix below.

 

General Studies Alignment Matrix

 

Course

Communicate

Manipulate math expressions

Work with data

Applications

Math 133

X

X

X

X

Math 134

X

X

 

X

Math 135

X

X

 

X

Math 137

X

X

 

X

Math 138

X

X

X

X

Math 142

X

X

 

X

Math 232

X

X

X

X

 

Assessments are embedded in courses for general studies.   Since most students take only one general studies mathematics course, assessment items will be pre-determined on a course-by-course basis at the time of offering.  Upon completion of each course offering the results of the assessments for general studies will be reviewed on an individual course basis.  An annual aggregation of the assessments of the courses listed in the general studies value-added matrix will be compiled, discussed, and reported.

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

See matrix in Program Assessment Plan for inclusion of mathematics as communication, skills in manipulating expressions, work with data, and modeling and problem solving.  The four General Studies program learning outcomes in math are included in or covered in part by Mathematics Program Learning Outcomes 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.3, 4.1, and 4.2.

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

Program is online, so it is possible for a student to complete the major or teaching endorsement, as well as the minors in mathematics and applied statistics without being on-campus.  Teachers seeking an “added endorsement” in mathematics are able to complete all math requirements from a distance.  Calculators are used extensively, and incorporation of SmartBoards and digitized audio have brought an “almost present” sense of delivery to off-campus students. 

 

Music

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

Music Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

2

2

11

23

14

1

0

1

1

14

3

32

61

16

50

0

6

2004

2

2

13

16

9

5

0

0

0

8

3

3

64

10

32

0

4

2003

0

0

4

4

7

0

0

6

3

3

7

2

32

10

29

0

4

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

Individual faculty instructors write the learning outcomes and conduct the assessment of the two General Studies courses with which we are involved. The assessment tools utilized in this effort are typically written assignments, quizzes, and examinations. There has been no recent department-wide attempt to assess the effectiveness of these courses. This may be partially attributed to faculty turnover and change in load allocation.

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

Objective 1

Courses in music theory, music history, music literature, vocal and instrumental pedagogy, and music education all contain specific learning objectives that are closely aligned with this outcome. In particular, music students are frequently asked to “perceptively listen and observe,” followed directly by the opportunity to “objectively analyze and solve problems.” Major writing assignments in history and literature courses require that students apply critical thinking skills, gain access to information and knowledge, construct arguments and use evidence.

 

Objective 2

The courses that most directly apply this objective are those in music history, music theory, and music literature. By nature, the courses taken by music majors and minors go into far greater depth than parallel courses designed for the General Studies program.

Objective 3

As discussed above, writing assignments form the backbone of the music history courses. Feedback from the instructor(s) helps music students “in developing proficiency in written…communication.”

Music is inherently tied to this outcome by virtue of its relationship with mathematics. As such, it has its own language and symbols, and students who study it must develop the ability to communicate, interpret, and understand it. Instructional courses in performance and music theory emphasize this outcome.

Objective 4

Music students learn to differentiate stylistic traditions as they study individual musical compositions in private instruction courses and through ensemble participation. Students directly participate in recreating the music of various cultures and of various eras.

Objective 5

Students become aware of the positive mental, emotional, and physical benefits of music performance through individual practice coordinated with the private music lesson.

Objective 6

Music theory courses develop students’ abilities to recognize mathematical relationships and apply principles of acoustics. Music history and literature courses draw frequent parallels with theater, art, dance, literature, and science. Music education courses require students to devise instructional units that incorporate cross-disciplinary themes.

Objective 7

Music business and music education courses probably emphasize recognition of values and ethics more than other music courses.

Objective 8

This objective is included in all music courses. It is extremely important for music students to develop proficiency and maturity in their chosen field. It is equally important to the faculty that we assess this carefully and honestly at regular intervals throughout the academic career of each student.

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

Our two General Studies courses—MUS 235: Elements of Music and MUS 436: African-American Popular Music, 1619–1980—reflect an effort to incorporate more music from outside the western European tradition into course curriculum. Over the past decade, the publishers of music textbooks have generally made a concerted effort to incorporate the accomplishments of historically under-represented groups into their texts. Several years ago, the faculty recommended the adoption of a new textbook in the traditional “music appreciation” course (Elements of Music) in order to provide our students with exposure to a much larger amount of non-Western music than the previous text allowed.

 

The course in African-American Popular Music, 1619–1980 was devised by one of our faculty members in response to a growing interest in the history of contemporary music. It has been very successful and incorporates elements that represent the cultural diversity of the modern world.

 

These and other modifications are primarily attributable to particular faculty members being aware of the changing world climate and a desire to maintain the relevance of our curriculum among our student population. There is at present no external advisory board, and annual program review has largely been left to individual effort rather than faculty discussion and long-range planning.

 

Physical & Life Sciences

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

Physical and Life Sciences Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

15

15

9

20

0

5

0

4

7

37

17

18

20

61

22

0

13

2004

9

7

6

14

0

6

0

7

7

23

10

20

12

53

10

0

11

2003

9

7

6

14

0

6

0

7

7

23

10

20

12

53

10

0

12

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

The majority of the courses in physical science that can be taken for general studies credit are also courses in the major and as such have been assessed from a program standpoint rather than a general studies point of view in the past.  A General Studies Assessment Committee has determined and set the criteria to be evaluated in general studies courses on the CSC campus.  This will result in modification of the assessment tests used in the Physical and Life Sciences Department for classes which can be taken for general studies credit to include a component directed toward the general studies criteria determined by the committee.  This had not been implemented at the time of the writing of this report.

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

The student learning outcomes of the science courses in the General Studies Program are comparable to those that we have set for our major’s courses as part of our program assessment.

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

Science as a discipline relies on and, in many instances, drives the advances in technology.  One of our department’s goals is to deliver a hands-on application based learning environment for our students.  To that end we assimilate as many of the technological advances in the field into our curriculum as is applicable to our students career goals and is possible with the level of funding we have at our disposal.  This is usually in the form of laboratory equipment that the students get direct experience in using.  Equipment needs are determined in part as a result of discussions with former students, employers, graduate program directors, etc. (an unofficial external advisory board)  as to what technologies and equipment they are using and would like to see our graduates competent in the used of.  These equipment requests are prioritized by the department and purchased as funds become available.

 

Social Sciences

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

Applied History

The instructor has attended state and regional professional museum conferences since her arrival in 2004. At these conferences, the instructor has received in many areas including training in exhibit mount and storage mount construction. She has attended an archiving workshop sponsored by the State Historical Records Advisory Board. The instructor has also been a regular attendee at state tourism conference meetings. The conferences have included topics such as niche marketing and marketing analysis.

 

History & Social Sciences Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

3

2

7

24

0

10

1

15

3

12

9

16

15

17

12

0

8

2004

7

5

12

12

0

7

1

16

6

10

6

8

13

11

3

0

7

2003

8

7

2

16

0

12

0

0

0

8

4

9

11

14

3

0

6

History & Social Science

 

 

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

                       

Applied History

As the instructor’s primary duties are as professional staff at the College, scholarship is not a job requirement. However, the instructor has written a book review for the Nebraska State Historical Society’s magazine. The instructor was also part of the team that curated the Ray and Faye Graves Photographic Exhibition and wrote the award-winning companion book.

 

The instructor has also presented several scholarly papers to various groups including the Nebraska State Historical Society (Saturdays at the Rock series), state and regional museum conference.

 

The instructor is also planning to take a graduate course in the spring semester through Chadron State College.

 

History & Social Science

 

See chart above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

Applied History

Applied History is not involved in General Studies courses.

 

History & Social Science

In March 2006, the History and Social Science programs commenced developing learning outcomes for General Studies.  For instance, the History program now has specific learning outcomes for the History component of General Studies.  They are the following:

 

General Studies Assessment—History

 

Learning Outcomes                                       Performance Criteria

1. Students will develop an informed, critical, and articulate sense of the past, an appreciation for the diversity of the human experience within the Western World, and an awareness of the role of tradition, people, and past events in shaping the present. 

1a. Identify and relate the causes and consequences of the major turning points in either the History of Western Civilization or United States History, including but not limited to the Rise and Fall of Rome, the Scientific Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, and the Cold War;

 

1b. Define the major political, economic, and social trends for the course(s) of study;

 

1c. Describe the interactions of various peoples with one another, including the short- and long-term consequences of those encounters; and

 

1d. Trace the migration patterns of peoples across the globe and assess the effects of such movement.

 

2. Students will write effectively and evaluate the written expression of others.

2a. Write logically and persuasively;

 

2b. Use proper grammar and punctuation;

 

2c. Read critically the writing of others;

 

2d. View writing as a process requiring planning, drafting, and revising; and

 

2e. Use standard English.

 

Other courses within the Social Science program are also taught as a part of the General Studies program.  They include: PS 231: American National Government” and PS 341: Comparative Politics (both under the Government component), and Geography 300: World Cultures, History 320: Asian Cultural Realm, Sociology 230: Society: Structure and Process, Sociology 335: Ethnic and Minority Group Relations, and Sociology 340: Social Change, all of which are taught under the Global and Social Awareness component.  Recently, Geography 231: Physical Geography has been added to the list of courses which count for the Physical Science component of General Studies.  At this time, Social Science faculty members teaching courses in the abovementioned components are creating General Studies learning outcomes specific to those components.  Thus, these General Studies courses are assessed in part through the learning outcomes that have been and are being created.

 

In addition, like all other courses in the Social Science program, the General Studies courses which Social Science faculty members teach are also assessed through course reflective statements.  This began in fall 2005 and continues to take place at the end of each semester.  An example of this document is provided on the next page for your perusal.           


SOCIAL SCIENCE

COURSE REFLECTIVE STATEMENT

 

            Course Name _______________________________________

            Course Number ________________

            Section Number ________________

            Term                 ________________

 

 Grades (list number of each):

            A _____                                  D _____                      IP _____

            B _____                                   F  _____                      W _____

            C _____                                  I   _____

 

 

1.         Describe the relationship of the Student Learning Objectives for their course. Relate to the Program Student Learning Objectives for Majors, Minors, Endorsements, and/or General Studies.

 

 

 

 

 

2.         List successful factors-exercises, practices, lessons, or units that should be replicated or possibly expanded upon in future classes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.         List items that need to be revised, reduced, or dropped. Why?

 

 

 

 

 

4.         Were the above items discussed with your colleagues? What were the

results/suggestions?

 

 

 

 

 

5.         Do the student learning outcomes listed for this class remain appropriate?

 

 

We are convinced that through these two elements that the History and Social Science programs effectively assess their courses taught within the General Studies program.  We believe that course reflective statement sheets assist faculty members in making appropriate changes to these courses that improve the overall quality of the General Studies program.

 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

Applied History

I am unsure as to what the overall learning outcomes for General Studies as a whole are. I am aware that each course in General Studies has learning outcomes, but the learning outcomes for “General Studies” are is unclear to me. However, as the Applied History courses are upper divisional, faculty in Applied History expect certain skills of students when they arrive in these classes. These skills are assumed to be covered in General Studies, skills such as grammar, library usage, critical analysis of research sources.

 

            History & Social Science

The learning outcomes for both History and Social Science programs were created before the learning outcomes for General Studies.  However, they are in fact interrelated.  For instance, the first learning outcome for the History component for General Studies, “Students will develop an informed, critical, and articulate sense of the past, an appreciation for the diversity of the human experience within the Western World, and an awareness of the role of tradition, people, and past events in shaping the present” is a minor variation of the mission statement for the History program.  The performance criteria, mentioned in our response in Criterion 1, not only relate to the first learning outcome but also—and quite significantly—serve as building blocks or the foundation for upper-division history courses.   Therefore, it is critical for history majors to take the lower-division General Studies history courses before they enroll in upper-division history courses.

 

Furthermore, the second learning outcome for the History component for General Studies, “Students will write effectively and evaluate the written expression of others” is also a critical element of the college’s mission statement.  By helping students improve their writing and critical thinking skills, history faculty members also teach students important life skills necessary for almost any profession.  This learning outcome—along with its corresponding performance criteria—also serves as a necessary building block for history majors who will take upper-division courses requiring all sorts of assignments and research papers. 

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

Applied History

Course content has been updated to represent a more diverse society. For example, in the Introduction to Museums course, students are required to read about museum innovators from different time periods, disciplines, and genders. Most of the innovators that are studied are from the United States or Western Europe. Through the purchase of software, the Applied History program will be able to take students on a virtual tour of museums around the world, including Asia.

 

Students in the Collections Management and Care course learn about different types of collections management software. Many of the students use the Internet to research for individual report and to contact museums.

 

These changes and modifications were made at the request of new faculty in the Applied History program. I am member of the American Association of Museums standing professional committee COMPT, which stands for Committee on Museum Professional Training. COMPT strives to assist museum professionals and pre-professionals in their career learning experiences, to address the continuous need to develop and enhance professional goals, and to proactively engage with pressing concerns that affect professionals across the field.

 

            History & Social Science

The Social Science program has undergone several technological modifications over the past three years.  First of all, Dr. Rankin has added a web (Blackboard) component and PowerPoint presentations to several, in not a majority, of his History courses.  Web enhancement has allowed for unique opportunities for students to debate issues and post their views through the Internet.  Dr. Rankin has also taught a few of his courses through the IDL delivery system, thus allowing students in Scottsbluff, Alliance, and North Platte to receive direct instruction. 

 

Second, Dr. Catherine Lockwood has created and is creating several online Geography courses.  For instance, during fall 2006, Geography 231 “Physical Geography” and Geography 300 “World Cultures” will be taught as online courses.  In spring 2007, Geography 232 “Cultural Geography” will be also taught as an online course.  Her intention is to have the entire Geography minor online.

 

Third, Dr. Hyer uses PowerPoint presentations in all of his courses, except one.  In addition, in fall 2004, Dr. Hyer taught History 331 “Latin American History” through the IDL delivery system to students in Scottsbluff, Alliance, and North Platte.  In fall 2006, Dr. Hyer will teach History 331 “Latin American History” and History 435/535 “History of Historical Writing” through that same satellite system. 

 

Therefore, members of the Social Science faculty are seeking to use technology in their courses.  They are striving to teach those within the college’s service region who cannot attend classes in Chadron.  Admittedly, these technological improvements to courses appear to be less related to an annual review of the Social Science program and more to the personal decisions of individual faculty to facilitate course instruction and student learning.

 

At this time the history and social science programs have no external advisory board, so none was used in order to make program modifications.  In spring 2007, both programs will begin to receive feedback from alumni who graduated five years earlier.  This annual feedback will serve as a significant and permanent source for program modifications.

 

Visual & Performing Arts

 

1.      What professional development or training activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories the types of activities and the number of participants for each.  Have Vision 2011 funds supported any of these activities?

 

Visual and Performing Arts Professional Development Activities Summary

Grants Written

Grants Received

Presentations to Natl & Regional Groups

Off-campus Conference Attendance

Juried Performance & Shows

Article Publications

Book Publications

Active Participation in Prof. Org.

Active Partic. in Specialized Org

Campus Committee Membership

Student Org/Club Sponsor

Service to Local & State Civic Boards

Presentations to local/state groups

Member of Prof. Org.

Research

2011 funds used

# of Participants

2005

0

0

0

13

15

16

0

0

0

9

2

0

15

0

17

0

5

2004

0

0

0

7

29

0

0

0

0

6

2

0

16

3

9

0

4

2003

0

0

0

6

36

0

0

0

0

10

0

0

15

13

9

0

3

 

 

2.      What scholarly activities have members of your unit participated in over the past three years?  Please list by categories and number of participants.

 

See Above

 

3.      How does your unit assess the effectiveness of General Studies courses with which you are involved?

 

Art

The Art Department uses written assignments, quizzes, examinations, demonstrations, hands-on art projects and gallery visits to ensure student learning outcomes.  These are looked at as well as the course evaluation questionnaire each student fills out at the end of each semester.  We discuss as a department, these elements and make adjustments accordingly.

           

All elements courses (Art, Literature, Music, and Theatre) across campus have developed common learning outcomes from the courses in order to assess the entire general studies requirement of the Fine Arts area.  Again, assessment through the semester end surveys, test results and experiences that the student encounters in the courses.

 

            Theatre

The Theatre Program offers two sections of Elements of Theatre each semester.  These two sections are often taught by each of the two members of the Theatre Program.  Each week, the two instructors discuss projects, approaches, and “compare notes” for what has proven successful and what needs to be eliminated or improved. 

 

As with all Theatre courses, at the conclusion of each semester, all students are given a course survey in which they rate the course for effectiveness, list which activities and assignments they felt were most useful, and are asked to recommend any changes that they feel would improve the course.  Each instructor of each section also fills out a “Course Reflection” at the conclusion of the semester. This document includes total number of final grades, an assessment of the outcomes of the course, a reflection on strengths and weaknesses and a journal entry that “brainstorms” possible improvements for the future.
 

4.      How does your unit integrate the learning outcomes of General Studies into your programs and courses that are not specifically required in G.S.?

 

Art

In working with other areas in the General Studies as far as the Art requirement is concerned, we have tried write learning outcomes that not only meet the needs of most of our Art courses, i.e., aesthetics, production, criticism, structures and history, but also it works with other elements courses in Music, Literature and Theatre which are covering the same type of things.  All components are covered in each of the areas of the learning outcomes.

 

            Theatre

Throughout 2004-2005, the Theatre Program revised both its learning outcomes and mission statement to insure more specifically measurable outcomes for both the program and for the General Studies contribution Theatre makes.  This resulted in the addition of new courses such as Acting for the Camera, Stage Combat, Scene Painting as well as the faculty actively encouraging and assisting students in independent studies in Acting, Sound Design, Lighting Design, Mechanical Drafting, Costume Design and Construction. 

 

5.      Has your unit updated any courses or services to reflect a more global, diverse or technological society?  If so, how were these modifications related to the annual review of your program or to recommendations of an external advisory board?

 

Art

There is no external board and/or review, although the chair of the department has attended the National Council of Art Administrators Conferences each year.  Returning from those meetings, discussions are held regarding the national trends, what other departments are learning from assessment, how to create better coordination between these departments, and if students are getting a similar experience across the G.S. requirements.  Relationships between Art, Science, Chemistry, Physics and other disciplines are studied to develop better understandings of all.

 

In our general studies course, Elements of Art, we continually add artists and art from different cultures around the world especially when relevant to world events such as adding points on Islamic art.  Also new art forms, art media and artists are also discussed and shown.  The same is true in graphic design where we constantly stay abreast of both technology issues and mass communication and design issues in a global society through examples and discussion.

 

            Theatre

In 2001, Memorial Hall was entirely remodeled resulting in the following technology improvements for students and audiences:

·        Addition of a “Black Box Theatre” equipped with computer lighting and sound and flexible audience seating for different configurations

·        A Theatre computer lab including a light grid and plotter

 

The Theatre Program’s Elements of Theatre course requires viewing approximately six different live and recorded performances each semester.  One that has been added and kept for its global and cultural diversity (as well as its impact on students and class discussion) is Athol Fugard’s play Master Harold and the boys. This play takes place in Port Elizabeth South Africa and centers around apartheid, focusing on how Harold’s prejudice against the two hired black men, Willie and Sam, is entirely founded on Harold’s father’s bias. 

 

Our season of plays (four each year selected by a steering committee created in 2002 consisting of both faculty and student representatives) has created a list of criteria for each season that includes:  plays of social relevance, productions for young audiences, literary merit, female and/or feminist playwrights, historical significance, and variety of genre.

 

Theatre’s computer lab has been upgraded with 10 stations fully equipped for:

·         3-D Rendering and Set Design

·         Lighting Design

·         Film Editing

·         Creating DVD and CDR

 

Program has purchased digital photo equipment allowing for:

·         “In House” creation of headshots and resumes

·         Filming and Editing of screenplays

 

A comprehensive major has been created expanding the BA to 54 hours for more complete training in all aspects of Theatre.

 

Created new courses based on assessment feedback in:

§         Stage Combat

§         Children’s Theatre Workshop (including a touring Children’s Theatre Production)

§         Computer Applications for the Theatre

§         Acting for the Camera

§         Scene Painting

 

Theatre currently has submitted a proposal to upgrade Memorial Auditorium to include new wireless microphones, new speaker systems, speaker placement and hearing impaired infrared systems.

 

In 2003, the program expanded the “Children’s Theatre Workshop” to include a tour of elementary schools in the Panhandle Region.  In 2003 this group performed at Crawford, Gordon, Rushville, Alliance, Hemingford, Crawford, and Harrison, as well as all of Dawes County’s elementary students.

 

All of the above improvements were the direct result of annual review by program faculty and input from constituents on and off campus.  While the Theatre Program maintains no formal “advisory board,” it encourages, solicits and welcomes input from the American Conservatory Theatre Festival visiting respondents (usually college theatre faculty from other institutions in the region), faculty from outside the discipline.  The Theatre Program has recently included an Audience Survey for all productions seeking feedback on quality of acting, set design, light design, costume design and overall success.