Chapter 1:  Institutional Context

This introductory chapter is intended to provide a broad orientation to Chadron State College (CSC).  The HLC Institutional Snapshot is included in the Appendix of the Self-Study.  The snapshot provides additional data related to the college and its constituents.

 

The State Context

Demographics:

  • Nebraska is a predominantly rural state with a population of 1,711,263 individuals, most of whom live in the eastern metropolitan areas of Omaha and Lincoln, or along the east-west Interstate 80 corridor in the southern part of the state. 
  • The state is home to 531 incorporated communities, only 32 of which have populations greater than 5,000.
  • The thirty western-most counties of the state’s 93 counties comprise the college’s geographic service area.
  • Twenty of the counties in the college’s service region are designated as frontier counties with populations of fewer than 2,500 people.  Six other counties are designated as small trade counties with populations between 2,500 and 7,500.  The remaining four counties in the service region are classified as large trade counties with populations greater than 7,500. 
  • On average, the CSC thirty counties have 4.9 individuals per square mile. 
  • Five of the twenty poorest counties in the United States are in the CSC service region, including the two poorest counties in the U.S.  Twenty-two of the counties in the college’s service region experienced out-migration during the 1990’s.
  • The CSC thirty-county region includes 49 percent of Nebraska’s land area, but only 11 percent of the state’s population.  The thirty-county region covers 37,792 square miles, which is a landmass larger than the individual areas of thirteen states, including Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Vermont, and West Virginia.  Due to the extraordinary size of the CSC service area, the college has been actively involved in distance education since 1930 when the first professor provided off-site instruction in the Sandhills of Nebraska.

Governance:

  • Nebraska is the only state in the union to have a one-house legislature, the Unicameral.  The role and mission of CSC is legislatively mandated by this body in the Reissue Revised Statutes of Nebraska, 1999, Sections 85-917 through 85-934 and 85-949 through 85-958.  Chadron State College is authorized by the Nebraska Legislature to offer undergraduate programs, master’s level programs, and the educational specialist program.  Continuation and development of applied research and public services activities are additional legislatively mandated priorities.
  • Nebraska has a Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education (CCPE) (RR1) established in 1990 by a vote of the people.  The CCPE collaborates with the state’s public colleges and universities to implement a state-wide comprehensive plan to guide education in the state.  In addition, the commission administers student financial aid programs, reviews and authorizes academic programs, reviews and approves proposals for physical facilities, establishes boundaries for the service areas of all public institutions, reviews all institutions’ budget proposals, and makes recommendations to the State Legislature.
  • Nebraska’s public colleges and universities include three distinct systems.  The University of Nebraska system has three campuses along Interstate 80 in the cities of Omaha, Lincoln, and Kearney and is governed by a Board of Regents.  The Nebraska State College System (NSCS) (RR2) includes Chadron State College in the northwest, Wayne State College in the northeast, and Peru State College in the southeast regions of the state.  The NSCS is governed by a Board of Trustees.  The Nebraska Community College Association and System includes eight community colleges, including one tribal college and one Indian community college.  Each is governed by independent Boards of Governors.  Additionally there are sixteen private, independent colleges and universities in Nebraska, many of which have religious affiliations.

Nebraska State College System (NSCS):

  • The NSCS was established in 1867, when Nebraska became a state and Peru State College became the state’s first public postsecondary institution, as a state normal school for teacher preparation.
  • The legislature established three more normal schools at Kearney in 1903, at Wayne in 1910, and in Chadron in 1911.  In 1963 the legislature recognized these institutions as state colleges.  In 1991 Kearney State College became part of the University of Nebraska system, and the NSCS assumed its current status with three comprehensive, regional institutions:  Chadron State College, Peru State College, and Wayne State College. 
  • CSC is governed by the Board of Trustees of the NSCS and the statutes of the state of Nebraska.  The President of Chadron State College reports to the Chancellor of the NSCS.  The NSCS mission, vision, core values, strategic plan, and policy manual are available on its website at www.nscs.edu.

State Appropriations and Tuition:

  • State funding for CSC from the fall of 1997 to the spring of 2007 has grown from $10,507,259 to $14,181,707, with an average yearly increase of 3.4 percent.  During that time there have been three very difficult years which include academic years 2002-03, with a 2.13 percent increase; 2003-04, with a 5.14 percent decrease; and 2004-05, with a 2.18 percent increase.

Acad.

Year

State

Appropriation

%

Increase

97/98

10,507,259

2.98%

98/99

10,916,522

3.90%

99/00

11,459,968

4.98%

00/01

11,841,526

3.33%

01/02

12,628,426

6.65%

02/03

12,898,037

2.13%

03/04

12,235,491

- 5.14%

04/05

12,501,692

2.18%

05/06

13,475,315

7.79%

06/07

14,181,707

5.24%

 

  • The 2003-04 academic year included mid-year budget cuts and a total reduction in state support of 5.14 percent.   At that time a reduction-in-force committee was formed to study the efficiency and efficacy of all units at CSC.  Administrative restructuring at that time eliminated two academic dean positions and numerous professional and support staff positions.  No academic programs were lost, and no full-time faculty positions were eliminated during this time.
  • Since the three difficult academic years described above, state support has increased by 7.79 percent for the 2005-06 academic year, and 5.24 percent for the current 2006-07 year.
  • As might be expected, tuition increases have been used to close the gap created by lower state appropriations.  During the three most difficult years, tuition was increased by 9.32 percent, 14.1 percent, and 9.2 percent, respectively.  For the past two years tuition increases have been kept at their lowest level since 1999, with increases of 2.89 and 4.86 percent.  Nebraska’s newly elected governor has pledged to keep state appropriations for all state agencies to a minimal three-percent level, which may result in higher tuition rates for the next biennium. 

 

Acad.

Year

Tuition

Rates

%

Increase

97/98

57.75

5.00%

98/99

59.50

3.03%

99/00

62.50

5.04%

00/01

65.75

5.20%

01/02

69.75

6.08%

02/03

76.25

9.32%

03/04

87.00

14.10%

04/05

95.00

9.20%

05/06

97.75

2.89%

06/07

102.50

4.86%

 

The College Context

Environment:

  • Chadron State College, nestled against “C” Hill, lies within the southern boundary of the city of Chadron, Nebraska, which has a population of approximately 6,000 residents.  The scenic Pine Ridge of northwestern Nebraska has long been recognized as the most scenic portion of the state.  The prairie and hills around Chadron are rich in pioneer history, and the town was founded in 1885.  Fort Robinson State Park, twenty-eight miles to the west, was once a colorful frontier military post and now provides a variety of activities amid its historical buildings, including the Post Playhouse, which houses a summer theatre program sponsored by the college’s theatre department. Chadron State Park, the Pine Ridge, the Museum of the Fur Trade, the Sandhills of Nebraska, the Hudson-Meng Bison Kill site, the Agate Fossil Beds, the Black Hills of South Dakota, and the Hot Springs Mammoth Site provide opportunities for day trips, including sight-seeing, fishing, hunting, hiking, mountain biking, and skiing.  Additionally these sites provide research opportunities and field experiences for the CSC faculty and students.
  • The city of Chadron has a municipal airport with daily flights to Denver International Airport, city and college swimming pools, an accredited public school system, a Public Library, a community building, a modern municipal hospital with a health clinic for students, * and a system of beautiful public parks, and an arboretum.  In early 2000, “Sports Afield,” a big-game hunting and adventure magazine, designated Chadron as one of the “top 50 outdoor sports towns” in the nation and one of the four best mountain biking towns in the United States.  “Outside,” a magazine devoted to the outdoors, has selected Dawes County, where Chadron is located, as one of the nation’s top 100 counties in which to live.  
  • The Chadron State College residential campus, occupying two hundred eighty-one acres, is bound on the south by the tall, pine-clad buttes of the Pine Ridge.  Twenty-five major buildings with more than one million square feet of floor space provide state-of-the-art facilities for residential students.  Five buildings have been completely renovated in the past six years, and another is currently being remodeled.  For detailed information, please refer to Chapter Two. 
  • The Nelson Physical Activity Center (PAC) contains specialized rooms for indoor track, basketball, cardiovascular exercise, weight training, racquetball, dance, and gymnastics. Programming in the PAC includes academic programming for health, physical education, and recreation; athletics; student intramurals; student health and wellness; and employee and public health and wellness. 
  • The Ross Armstrong Gymnasium houses a basketball court, swimming pool, athletic offices, and specialized varsity weight rooms for student athletes. 
  • tudent Center houses the Eagle Pride Bookstore, the Eagle Grille snack bar, pool tables and giant TV, a ballroom, meeting rooms, student cafeteria, offices for student government, and a video conferencing room.  It also includes a wireless environment for laptop use. * The Student Senate and Campus Activities Board maintain offices in this revenue bond building.    
  • The Reta E. King Library contains over 500,000 print and microform volumes and 532 periodical subscriptions, complemented by other print and electronic resources.  It also houses a new student computer lab, electronically-mediated classroom, student meeting and seminar rooms, and a coffee café.  The library also boasts wireless laptop computers for checkout and student use * throughout the facility.  Library materials are accessible by students via on-site and Internet communications.  The computerized Nebraska State College Library catalog, reached via the King Library web page, identifies books in the Chadron, Wayne, and Peru State College libraries and acts as a gateway to the libraries at the three campuses of the University of Nebraska.  On-line, web-based periodical indexes and articles provide an electronic catalog of the world’s library collections.  Recently JSTOR Online Periodicals * was added to the library.  This resource provides over 100 online, full-text periodicals available via the Internet for distance learners as well as the campus’s residential students.  Library staff members provide instruction in information literacy for students, faculty, and classes across the campus.
  • A highlight this decade was the development of the Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center that pays tribute to the western Nebraska native who became one of Nebraska’s leading authors.  The center focuses on the settlement and development of the High Plains region, including the history of the cattle industry in the C.F. Coffee Gallery.  The center houses an archive of important historical documents and artifacts, as well as a state-of-the-art digitizing laboratory, the Kosman electronically-mediated classroom, a gallery of rotating artistic and historical exhibits, permanent exhibits on Sandoz and the High Plains environment, and the outdoor Heritage Gardens that feature native Sandhills and pioneer plantings. 
  • Other important and unique campus facilities include the High Plains Herbarium and Pharmacognsy Collection, the Eleanor Barbour Cook Museum of Geology, the CSC Planetarium, the Black Box Theatre, the “hot glass” glass-blowing facility in Memorial Hall, and the Nebraska Business Development Center (NBDC) operated by the Department of Business & Economics.  
  • Chadron State College has a long tradition of serving the needs of learners located across the vast region of the Great Plains with the first distance-learning course offered in 1930.  The college embraces its role as a regional institution, offering courses on the residential campus in Chadron, at select sites within western Nebraska via interactive television and on-site instruction, as well as online programs throughout the nation.  Offices in Alliance, McCook, North Platte, Sidney, and Scottsbluff are staffed by college employees to facilitate awareness of and response to regional needs, student enrollment and advising, and public outreach efforts.
  • A complete array of student services is available online for students enrolled in the college’s twelve distance learning programs.  These services are also available to the college’s residential students.  Through the website, www.chadronstateonline.com , students are able to learn more about CSC’s online program offerings and provided links to apply for admission, register for courses, communicate with advisors, review financial aid information and apply for assistance, access an array of student services, take a Readiness for Online Learning Quiz, visit a demonstration course, take a browser test, and participate in class.  
  • Chadron State College received the Employer of the Year Award from the Nebraska Federation of Business and Professional Women in 1995.  In 1997, Chadron State College was selected as Nebraska’s representative to help create the Western Governors University, which is designed to share resources in providing distance learning opportunities for place-bound learners in the western United States.  Chadron State received the “Connecting Nebraska Award” from the Nebraska Development Network after hosting a Non-Profit Organization Leadership Development Institute in 2000.  Chadron State College was selected for a “Hidden Treasure” Award by the Newsweek/Kaplan College Catalog in 2001 and also noted for offering a high level of individual academic attention from faculty.  In 2002 the Newsweek/Kaplan College Catalog also noted CSC’s responsiveness to individual student financial aid needs and again for the high level of attention from the faculty.  In 2004, CSC received the National Rural Education Excellence Award for its collaborative elementary education program with Mid-Plains Community College graduates in North Platte. The college continues to be recognized statewide and regionally for its focus on collaboration and partnerships to serve this region, and the college’s outstanding faculty, staff, and alumni are recognized each year with a variety of excellence awards.  

 

History:

·        Chadron State College’s mission has evolved from its heritage as a state normal school created primarily to prepare teachers to its present role as the only four-year college serving the western half of Nebraska, a rapidly changing and developing non-metropolitan region.

·        The State Board of Education selected Chadron as the site of a normal school in western Nebraska in 1910 and acquired eighty acres of land south of Chadron, including the grounds of Chadron Congregational Academy which had closed in the spring of 1910.  Nebraska State Normal School at Chadron was founded in 1911.

·        In 1921, the State Legislature changed the institution’s name to Chadron State Teacher’s College. As the name suggested, the primary purpose of the institution was teacher preparation; however, the statement in the catalog suggested a slightly expanded role “to promote the educational interests of western Nebraska.” The institution was granted the authority to confer the baccalaureate degree in education at this time.

·        In 1949, an act by the State Legislature authorized the college to grant the degree of Bachelor of Arts in arts and sciences.  Students could now enroll at Chadron and pursue curricula other than teacher training. However, the college continued to define itself as primarily a teacher’s college and the majority of the school’s graduates were prepared for a teaching career.

·        In 1964, the Nebraska Legislature changed the name of the institution to Chadron State College. Since that time, the mission of the college has changed from primarily teacher education to a comprehensive institution offering liberal arts and pre-professional programs in a variety of disciplines.

·        Chadron has offered a Master’s degree in Education since 1956.  In 1972, the Board of Trustees authorized CSC to offer the Specialist in Education degree.  In 1988, the Master’s in Business Administration was approved by the Board of Trustees.  The Bachelor of Applied Sciences was approved in 2001.  The Master of Science in Organizational Management was approved in 2006.

·        Western Nebraska is recognized as having a distinct regional character.  As a result of location this region plays a significant role in efforts of the nation and the world to solve the needs for food and energy while preserving the natural environment and improving the living and working conditions of people in both industrialized and developing nations.  Chadron State College has the mission to anticipate and be responsible to the needs for higher education in this changing region.  Chadron State College also serves a significant number (22 percent of the total fall 2006) of students from the surrounding states of Colorado, Wyoming, and South Dakota responding to and continuing to evolve to address the changing needs of western Nebraska and the surrounding region.

 

Governance and Organizational Structure:

·        Chadron State College is governed by the Board of Trustees of the Nebraska State Colleges.  The Nebraska State College System (NSCS) is comprised of the three regional, comprehensive institutions of Chadron State College, Peru State College, and Wayne State College.  The President of Chadron State College reports to the Chancellor of the NSCS.

·        The college’s policies and procedures are largely defined by the NSCS Board of Trustees Policy Manual (RR3), specific statutes of the state of Nebraska related to higher education and the NSCS (RR4), the CCPE (RR1), and the negotiated agreements with the bargaining units for faculty (RR5), professional staff, (RR6) and support staff (RR7).

·        Chadron State College subscribes to a shared governance model that includes regular input and recommendations from the Faculty Senate (RR8) and its committees.  In addition, faculty members serve on Presidential Committees (RR9) that have specific charges and provide yearly reports to the President with regard to institutional effectiveness.

·        Reporting directly to the President of Chadron State College, are three Vice Presidents:  the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Services, and the Vice President for Administration and Finance, these office comprises the President’s cabinet.

·        The Vice President for Academic Affairs oversees all academic and instructional programs at Chadron State College.  Deans and directors of the following units report to this vice president:  the School of Arts & Sciences; School of Business, Economics, Applied & Mathematical Sciences (BEAMS); School of Education, Human Performance, Counseling, Psychology & Social Work (EHPCPSW); The Reta E. King Library; The Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center; and Extended Campus Programs serving distance learning sites and online learners. Thirteen academic departments are located within the three academic schools, as follows:

 

      School of Arts & Sciences

§         Communication Arts                      

§         English & Humanities                                   

§         Justice Studies                                           

§         Music

§         Physical & Life Sciences

§         Social Sciences

§         Visual & Performing Arts

 

      School of Business, Economics, Applied & Mathematical Sciences

§         Applied Sciences

§         Business & Economics

§         Mathematical Sciences

 

School of Education, Human Performance, Counseling, Psychology & Social Work

§         Counseling, Psychology & Social Work

§         Education

§         Health, Physical Education & Recreation

 

  • The Vice President for Enrollment Management & Student Services oversees enrollment services, admissions, class registration and transcripts, financial aid, residential housing, student government and activities, health services, internships and career services, TRIO/Project Strive, and student academic success services.  Directors of these units, including the Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Management/Institutional Research Officer, report directly to this vice president. (RR10)
  • The Vice President of Administration & Finance oversees physical facilities, computer services, human resources, budgets, conferencing, inventory, business office, printing office, security, and contract services.  Directors of these units report to this Vice President. (RR11)
  • The President’s Executive Council is comprised of the three vice presidents and three academic deans, the Athletic Director, the Director of Cultural Programming & College Relations, the Executive Director of the Chadron State Foundation, the Director of Computer Services, the Assistant Vice President for Extended Campus Programs and the Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Management/Institutional Research Officer.
  • A complete organizational chart is included in the Appendix, and is also available on the website for the Human Resources Department.  (RR12)

 

Financial Data:

The table below summarizes by category the college’s revenues and expenses for the past two years.

 

Chadron State College

HLC Institutional Snapshot

Comparison of FY 2004/05 to 2005/06

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Category

 

 FY 2004/2005

 FY 2005/2006

Tuition and Fees (net)

 

 $    4,110,378

 $       4,029,872

State Appropriations

 

 $  12,501,692

 $     13,475,315

Investment Income

 

 $       279,946

 $          318,718

Capital & Private Grants & Contracts

 $    1,165,171

 $          913,954

Auxiliary enterprises, net

 

 $    3,524,559

 $       3,895,016

Other

 

 $    3,805,807

 $       2,989,586

  Total Revenues

 

 $  25,387,553

 $     25,622,461

 

 

 

 

Instruction

 

 $    9,066,543

 $          9,432,606

Student Services

 

 $    1,847,764

 $          2,111,751

Operation & Maintenance of Plant

 

 $    1,675,997

 $          2,228,065

Administration

 

 $    4,188,112

 $          4,514,191

Auxiliary

 

 $    2,332,962

 $          2,257,843   

Other

 

 $    5,854,423

 $       5,462,734**

  Total Expenses

 

 $  24,965,801

 $        26,007,190

 

 

 

 

    Revenues - Expenses

 

 $       421,752

 $        (384,729)**

 

 

 

 

**Of the $5,462,734 listed as an other expense in FY 2005/2006,

$1,343,158 was for Depreciation which is a non-cash expense.

                                                                                                            Source: David Noble, Comptroller

 

Employees:

  • Chadron State College is a unionized institution with three separate bargaining units for the three categories of employees.  These three categories are:  faculty, professional staff, and support staff.  Professional staff who have supervisory duties are excluded from the bargaining unit for that category.
  • Of the 357 total employees, there are 106 full-time faculty and 21 are part-time.  Thirty-five percent of the college’s employees are faculty. (RR13)
  • The professional staff includes personnel with baccalaureate or advanced degrees who are employed in supervisory or professional positions in student services, student academic support, library and learning resources, residence life, campus activities, conferencing, computer services, and academic and institutional administration.  There is 96 full- and part-time professional staff, which includes seven senior administrators serving as the president, three vice presidents, and three academic deans.
  • Support staff includes office assistants; maintenance workers, such as custodians; and skilled workers, such as electricians and carpenters.  There are 106 full- and part-time support staff positions at the college.  Complete organizational charts for all 357 employees are in the Appendix and are available on the Human Resources website at http://www.csc.edu/hr/information.htm

 

College Employees

Total #

Full-time

Part-time

2004

329

274

55

2005

341

300

41

2006

357

303

52

                                                                        Source: Kristal Kuhnel/Human Resources

 

 2004 Employees

Full Time

Part Time

Total

% of all Employees

Faculty

95

27

120

37%

 

Professional Staff

77

4

81

25%

 

Support Staff

102

1

103

31%

 

Graduate Assistants

0

23

23

7%

 

Total

274

55

327

 

 

2005 Employees

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty

102

14

116

34%

 

Professional Staff

90

3

93

27%

 

Support Staff

108

0

108

32%

 

Graduate Assistants

0

24

24

7%

 

Total

300

41

341

 

 

2006 Employees

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty

106

21

127

35%

 

Professional Staff

92

4

96

27%

 

Support Staff

105

1

106

30%

 

Graduate Assistants

0

28

28

8%

 

Total

303

54

357

 

 

                                                                                      Source: Kristal Kuhnel/Human Resources

 

Vision 2011 and Strategic Plan:

·        As Chadron State College approaches its centennial in 2011, it continues its leadership in educating and serving the citizens of Nebraska and the High Plains region.  CSC has been productively involved in new strategic planning since 2003, and its ambitions are articulated in its eight-year strategic plan, titled Vision 2011 (RR14). The plan is an eight-year plan, rather than the normal five, because it will lead into the centennial celebration of the college in 2011.

·        The Vision 2011 strategic planning process resulted in the following refined vision and mission statements, which have been distributed widely in Vision 2011 brochures.

Ř      Vision:  Chadron State College aspires to be a premiere institution of higher education in the western High Plains states, innovatively pursuing excellence in teaching, scholarship and service.

Ř      Mission:  Chadron State College will enrich the quality of life in the region by providing educational opportunities, research, service, and programs that contribute significantly to the vitality and diversity of the region.

·        A campus-wide Strategic Planning Committee initiated strategic planning in the spring of 2003.  Exhaustive environmental scanning fortified the planning process. 

·        In August 2003, the Strategic Planning Committee had produced an initial planning draft that was extensively discussed by faculty, administrators, and staff at an all-campus.

·        For additional details on the Vision 2011 planning process, please see Chapter Five.  (Link to http://www.csc.edu /csc2011/ default_flash.htm for an animated version of Vision 2011).

·        Each year, since 2004, the college has provided significant funding for projects developed by faculty, staff, and students that addressed the Vision 2011 focus areas and objectives.  Thus far the college has funded $702,501 of Vision 2011 requests. (RR15).

 

The Student Context

 

Enrollments and Student Demography:

Chadron State College is an open enrollment institution.  Historically, 62 percent of the undergraduates and 14 percent of the graduate students are enrolled full-time.  The following tables demonstrate enrollment patterns for the past three years based on fall semester enrollments.

 

 

                                                                                                Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

                                                                        Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

 

                                                                        Source: CSC Institutional Research

                                                                                         

                                                                        Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

At the end of the fall 2006 semester, the enrolled undergraduate students at CSC had the following characteristics:

·        Represented 12 countries including the U.S

·        Represented 40 states and Puerto Rico

·        Represented 89 of the 93 counties in Nebraska

·        Ranged in age from 17-82

·        Of those who responded, fifty-seven percent of those who responded to this query are first generation college students

·        Of those who have submitted high school transcripts, 68 percent were in the top half of their graduating class and 36 percent were in the top one-quarter

·        Of those submitting ACT reports, 24 percent scored 25 or above on the composite ACT and the top ACT composite scores equaling 32

Freshmen Applications and Enrollment
(Full-Time & Part-Time)

Freshmen

Fall 2004

Fall 2005

Fall 2006

Applications

1060

948

962

Enrollments

434

369

364

                                                                                                Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

 

Transfer Applications and Enrollment
(Full-Time & Part-Time)

Transfer

Fall 2004

Fall 2005

Fall 2006

Applications

303

308

295

Enrollments

125

140

150

                                                                                                Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

 

Graduate Applications and Enrollment
(Full-Time & Part-Time)

Graduate

Fall 2004

Fall 2005

Fall 2006

Applications

72

63

74

Acceptances

50

60

70

Enrollments

50

36

65

                                                                        Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

 

Undergraduate Standardized Mean Scores
(First-Time, Full-Time)

Undergraduate

Fall 2004

Fall 2005

Fall 2006

CSC ACT Composite

21.4

21.4

21.0

2006 Nebraska Average Composite ACT Score = 21.9

2006 National Average Composite ACT Score = 21.1
(Source: ACT, used with permission)

Graduate Standardized Mean Test Score

Graduate

Fall 2004

Fall 2005

Fall 2006

GRE

1200

1357

1498

GMAT

506

483

415

                                                                        Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

Financial Aid:

CSC offers grants, work-study, student, and parent loans to help with college costs.  Currently, our students graduate with a bachelor’s degree with an average student loan debt of $11,000 and approximately 90 percent of our graduates responding to the annual CSC Placement Survey (RR16) are employed within six months of graduation.  The 2006-07 costs of attendance including tuition for 30 credits, fees, residence hall double-room, and meal plan for 14 meals per week is $7,920.

 

Undergraduate & Graduate Financial Aid Applicants

 

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

Unduplicated Applicants

1,800

1,765

1,709

Total Unduplicated

Enrollment

2,947

2,690

2,931

Percentage of Unduplicated Total

Enrollment

61.08%

65.61%

58.31%

 

Undergraduate and Graduate Students Receiving Financial Aid

Financial Aid

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

Unduplicated Recipients

1,489

1,497

1,457

Total Unduplicated

Enrollment

2,947

2,690

2,931

Percentage of Unduplicated Total

Enrollment

50.53%

55.65%

49.71%

 

Table 3B-2
Undergraduate (UG) & Graduate (GR) Financial Aid Funding Percentages

 

2003-2004

2004-2005

2005-2006

Level

UG

GR

UG

GR

UG

GR

Loans

40.28%

1.73%

45.48%

1.78%

39.41%

2.32%

Workstudy

14.90%

0%

15.17%

0%

8.12%

0%

Scholarship/Grants

39.40%

1.05%

45.57%

1.12%

24.05%

1.16%

Academic Based Merit Based Scholarships/Waivers

24.70%

.58%

26.21%

.30%

24.09%

.61%

 

Institutional Tuition Discount Rate

 

Total CSC Tuition Waivers

CSC Tuition Revenue

Discount Rate

2003-2004

$1,237,996.00

$6,222,931.00

19.89%

2004-2005

$1,341,258.00

$6,875,191.00

19.51%

2005-2006

$1,380,429.00

$6,640,921.00

20.79%

                                                                        Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

Student Retention and Graduation Rates:

The following tables give retention rates for first-time freshman students, as well as overall graduation rates for undergraduate and graduate degrees.  The number of degrees awarded by academic discipline is listed in the Curricular Context section of this chapter.

 

 

Freshmen Retention
 (First-Time, Full-Time)


Semester

Entering Fall 2004

Returning Fall 2005

 

Entering Fall 2005

Returning Fall 2006

Gender

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

Gender Total

198

227

121

160

190

176

131

129

Total

425

281 (66.1%)

366

260 (71.0%)

*First to Second Year Retention Rates for Four-Year

Public Open Admission Colleges = 62.5%

(Source: ACT Institutional Data File 2006-Used with permission)

  

Undergraduate Six-Year Graduation Rate

Undergraduate

1998-1999 Cohort

1999-2000 Cohort

CSC

46.9%

46.9%

Persistence to Degree Rates for Four-Year Public Colleges for

Public Open Admission Colleges = 31.7%
(Source: ACT Institutional Data File 2006-Used with permission)

Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

Source: CSC Institutional Research

 

Student Placement and Employment:

The website for the Office of Internship & Career Services (RR17) provides access to the annual placement report.  In the previous academic year, 68 percent of graduates were employed in fields related to their degrees, 19 percent were hired outside their fields of study, 11 percent were enrolled in graduate or professional schools, and five percent were not looking or were still seeking employment.  Fifty-seven percent of graduates were employed in education.  Twenty-four percent were employed in business and industry, and 16 were in government or the non-profit sector, with three percent self-employed.  Sixty-two percent of the CSC graduates remained in Nebraska with 28 percent in surrounding states.

 

Co-curricular and Athletic Activities:

Students at Chadron State College can participate in a wide variety of co-curricular activities provided by the more than 70 student clubs and organizations.  A complete listing with descriptions of these organizations is available at http://www.csc.edu/clubs/.     

·        The college fields NCAA Division II teams in football, volleyball, men’s and women’s basketball, track and field, wrestling, women’s golf, and women’s softball. 

·        Chadron State has an excellent rodeo team that hosts a regional collegiate rodeo each year, and boasts six national collegiate champions in individual events.

 

Student Services:

Numerous services are available at Chadron State College to promote the academic and social success of all students.   Details about these services are available on the CSC website.  Many of these services are available for distance learners and online students.  An ombudsman for distance learners in the office of Extended Campus Programs provides information about those services for distance learners, and assists them with problems or concerns.  Services for residential students are available in Crites Hall, and the Peer Tutoring Center is located in the Kline Center.  Available services include:    

·        Academic Advising – The Advising Center * in Crites Hall assists students with questions about admission and graduation requirements, as well as with advice concerning academic programs and the planning of class schedules.  Located in Crites Hall, the Advising Center is staffed by college faculty and trained professionals in Student Academic Success Services (SASS).  In addition, each student at CSC is assigned a personal academic advisor who is a professor at the college.  As students change their majors, they may also change academic advisors by completing a change of advisor form in the registrar’s office in Crites Hall.  The Advising Center’s website provides answers to questions about selecting a major, registering for classes, and finding a career.  The First Year Seminar, an elective course for freshmen and transfer students, helps students adjust to the demands of college. (RR18)

·        Admissions – The Admissions Office serves as the first CSC contact for most undergraduate students and has a key role in providing students with up-to-date information about the academic, co-curricular, and financial assistance programs available.  In addition, through refined and expanded communication systems the office is introducing CSC to an increasing and diverse number of students. The admissions representatives travel throughout the region to meet with students and to invite them to visit the campus.   The office coordinated 561 prospective student campus visits in 2006 to allow the students and their families to meet with various offices and faculty during the visit. (RR19)  

·        Campus Activities – The Student Campus Activities Board provides funding for a wide array of organized activities that allow students to form friendships and participate in co-curricular experiences that complement and support academic success.  There are more than 70 campus clubs and organizations that include academic departmental and interest clubs, honorary societies, intercollegiate and intramural sports, music and publication groups, and religious organizations.  A full-time Coordinator of Student Activities works with CAB to plan and implement an impressive array of activities associated with such events as Freshmen Orientation, Homecoming, and Spring Daze.  See the CSC Student Handbook (RR20) for more detailed information on these activities and other aspects of college life.

·        Career Counseling – Career counseling is available to assist students in exploring career options and developing effective job search skills.  The Career Center provides assistance to students in making career-related decisions through the assessment of skills, interests, beliefs, values, and personality characteristics.  The Career Resource Library (RR21) contains information and resources on numerous businesses, careers, job vacancies, college catalogs, and job search strategies.  It is located in Crites Hall in Student Academic Success Services. (RR22)   

·        Computer Services – Computer Services provides a wide range of services for students, faculty, and staff.  Internet connectivity is available campus-wide, including all rooms in the residence halls.  Wireless environments are currently available in the Student Center and the Reta E. King Library. *   Twenty-five computer labs are maintained around the campus for general use by students, for specialized instruction, or in support of student services.  The Computer Services website has more detailed information about these services. (RR23)

·        Disability Services – Services for students with disabilities include counseling, tutoring, and assistance in discussing their academic needs with professors, as well as providing additional resources, referral services and/or special accommodations as appropriate.  Students who are in need of special accommodations may visit the Student Academic Success Services office in Crites Hall.  A student-initiated conference with the Disability Services Contact Person can be arranged.  Documentation of the disability(ies) by a qualified professional must be on file in the Disability Service Contact Person’s office in order to evaluate requests. (RR24)

  • Financial AidThe Financial Aid Office works closely with students and families online and in person to provide information about financing their college degrees.  Over $10,000,000 in federal, state, campus, and private financial aid and scholarship funds are distributed to qualified students annually.  In addition, the office works closely with the Admissions Office to share financial aid information with incoming students and campus visitors.  The office continues to work with the academic departments and the Chadron State Foundation, the office streamline scholarship processes and communications for students. (RR25)
  • Health Services – Located in Crites Hall, Health Services is staffed by a registered nurse who treats minor illnesses and injuries, dispenses non-prescription medication, and offers wellness and lifestyle counseling. If prescription drugs or further treatment are needed, the nurse will make appointments for students at a local medical clinic.  The college, in partnership with the Chadron Community Hospital, provides regular clinic hours each day at the hospital,* where an array of services are immediately available to students.  During the 2005-2006 academic year more than 695 students visited the clinic. (RR26)
  • Housing & Food Service – The Housing & Residence Life Office assigns and supervises all on-campus housing, which includes six residence halls and numerous one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments.  A variety of housing options are available and accommodations may be selected on the basis of need, interest, and cost.  All first-year students are required to live on campus and meal program except for those who are:  (1) married, (2) a single parent, (3) living with parents, or (4) over 21 years of age.  Students residing in the residence halls are required to participate in the food service program.  Meals are served Monday through Sunday in the Student Center cafeteria or the Eagle Grille.  Students living in CSC apartment housing are eligible to purchase a meal plan.  Specific policies pertaining to Chadron State College residence halls and apartments are included in the CSC Student Handbook and at the Housing website. (RR27)
  • Internship & Career Services – Located in Crites Hall, the Internship & Career Services Department assists students in the job application process by providing access to job vacancy bulletins and computerized job searching.  Career services are available for employment following graduation or for part-time or temporary employment during the school year.  Assistance with finding internship opportunities is also available.  On average there are 200-250 students participating in internships with an average annual student credit-hour production of 864.   Services include resume and credential file preparation, interview practice, business etiquette, and coordination of on-campus interviews with company representatives.  In addition, students have the ability to register with the resume referral file and education students, can be entered on the active registrant list.  Both of these services can be made available to employers upon request. (RR17)
  • Multicultural Services – Multicultural Services assists all Chadron State College students to live effectively in today’s global community. Program activities provide opportunities for diverse groups to build understanding and respect through communication and shared experiences.  International exchange programs for faculty and students are also available.  The college employs a Student Services Counselor who is responsible for multicultural and international student services in the office of Extended Campus Programs in Crites Hall, including a Multicultural Resource Center. * (RR28)
  • Personal CounselingA certified counselor makes available confidential, personal counseling to all students.  This short-term counseling is available for students who are making difficult choices, going through periods of transition, seeking to change behaviors and/or improving their decision-making skills.  The SASS website has more detailed information. (RR29)
  • Registrar’s Office Student course registration, transcripts and graduation applications are coordinated through the Registrar’s Office through in person, phone and online services.  Working closely with the academic departments and Computer Services, the office maintains the online degree audit services offered through MyCSC and guides students through credit transfer and graduation application processes.  In addition, the Registrar is the Primary Designated School Official (PDSO) for International students and provides leadership for the administration of veteran’s programs as the School Certifying Official.  The office is also a key link for CSC alumni seeking transcripts and information about their former or future academic programs. (RR30)
  • Residence Life - The Residence Life staff offers the resident student a variety of educational, social, and recreational programs that encourage responsible decision-making and healthy lifestyles.  Programs designed to enhance academic success, personal wellness, recreational opportunities, social functions, and community involvement are emphasized. (RR31)
  • Student Support Services (SSS) – The Student Support Services (SSS) - Project STRIVE/TRIO program is an academic enrichment program designed to assist students during their college career. The objectives of the STRIVE/TRIO program are to promote and increase participants’ academic success, assist with progress towards college graduation, and provide information regarding the pursuit of advanced degrees.  STRIVE/TRIO also provides cultural and social enrichment opportunities, leadership training, and opportunities for career exploration.  During the 2005-2006 academic year there were 167 participants in the STRIVE/TRIO program. (RR32)
  • Tutoring – Chadron State College’s nationally certified Peer Tutor program provides walk-in, individual, and small group tutoring sessions.  Other services include supplemental instruction for groups of students enrolled in challenging courses, and a Writing Center and a Speaking Center *that assists students with writing and presentation skills and assignments.  Tutors are specially trained upper-class students who excel in the areas in which they tutor and have previously taken the classes in those areas.  Peer tutoring services are available for daytime tutoring, nighttime study, supplemental instruction, and online sessions for residential and distance learners.  Smarthinking, a commercially available 24/7 online tutoring service, has been initiated in the fall 2006 to assist both residential and distance learners with increased access to tutoring services beyond the normal operating hours of the Tutoring Center.  Tutoring services are free to all students, and are available on the second floor of the Kline Center.   Each semester there are 20-30 tutors and 4-5 Supplemental Instruction leaders who assist approximately 200 students. (RR33)

 

The Faculty and Administrative Context

Faculty Demography:  The following tables summarize the characteristics of CSC faculty.

 

 

Faculty by Degrees

 

2004

2005

2006

Degree

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Part-time

Doctorate

57

8

58

7

62

9

Master's

37

17

44

6

44

9

Bachelor's

0

2

0

1

0

3

Total

94

27

102

14

106

21

                                                                                                   Source: Kristal Kuhnel/Human Resources

                                                           

Percentage of Faculty with Terminal Degrees and Tenure

Year

2004

2005

2006

Terminal Degree

67%

66%

67%

Tenure

39%

37%

37%

             *Reported for full-time faculty only      

                                                                                      Source: Kristal Kuhnel/Human Resources

 

 

Faculty Race/Ethnicity

 

2004

2005

2006

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Part-time

Full-time

Part-time

White

88

26

98

13

102

19

Black

0

0

0

0

0

0

Hispanic

1

0

1

0

0

1

Asian or Pacific Islander

4

0

2

0

3

0

Indian or Alaskan Native

1

1

1

1

1

1

Unknown

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

94

27

102

14

106

21

                                                                                                Source: Kristal Kuhnel/Human Resources

                                                                       

 

Faculty Gender

 

Fall 2004

Fall 2005

Fall 2006

Full-Time

Part-Time

Full-Time

Part-Time

Full-Time

Part-Time

Male

62

13

65

12

66

20

Female

32

14

37

2

40

1

Total

94

27

102

14

106

        21

                                                                                                   Source: Kristal Kuhnel/Human Resources

 

Faculty by Rank

 

 

Fall 2004

Fall 2005

Fall 2006

 

Full-Time

Part-Time

Full-Time

Part-Time

Full-Time

Part-Time

Full Prof

25

3

19

5

20

5

Associate Pr

23

1

24

0

27

0

Assistant Pr

30

1

45

0

45

0

Instructor

16

0

14

0

14

0

Adjunct

0

22

0

9

0

16

Total

94

27

102

14

106

21

                                                                                                  Source: Kristal Kuhnel/Human Resources

 

 

             Faculty by Academic Discipline

Faculty by CIP code

2004

2005

2006

 

Full-Time

Part-Time

Full-Time

Part-Time

Full-Time

Part-Time

Agriculture/Natural Resources (1)

2

1

2

1

2

4

Architecture/Engineering/

Engineering Technology (15)

3

1

2

0

2

2

Biological & Physical Science (26, 40, 41)

11

0

12

1

12

3

Business (52)

11

6

13

0

13

2

Communications/

Communication Technology/Fine Arts

(9, 50)

13

7

15

5

16

2

Education/Library Science (13, 20, 25)

17

4

17

1

17

1

Humanities/Interdisciplinary
(5, 16, 23, 24, 30, 38, 39, 54)

11

1

11

2

12

3

Military Technology/Protective Services (29,43)

5

0

5

0

5

0

Mathematics/Computer

Science (11, 27)

7

0

7

1

7

1

Psychology/Social Sciences

& Services (42, 44, 45)

11

7

14

3

15

3

Personal Services/Consumer Services/Fitness (12,19,31)

3

0

4

0

5

0

 Total

94

27

102

14

106

21

Avg. FTE for Part-Time Faculty

 

0.19

 

0.22

 

0.18

                                                                                                   Source: Kristal Kuhnel/Human Resources

 

Faculty Resources and Support:

Please see Chapter Seven for detail.

  • Resources provided to faculty in addition to school and departmental operations, library, and equipment budgets include $500 per faculty member per year for travel to conferences and professional development activities. 
  • College vehicles are provided for use by faculty or faculty with groups of students. 
  • The Faculty Senate Research Institute Committee (RIC) distributes $23,000 per year in seed money for research projects to faculty.  Grants may be used for operations, equipment, travel, and student research assistant stipends. 
  • Each year the college awards a minimum of two sabbatical or personal leave requests for faculty based on meritorious proposals. 
  • The Vice President for Academic Affairs, working in conjunction with a task force from the Faculty Senate, has created a new program which will take effect in the 2007-08 academic year.  The program, called Mini-sabbaticals In Situ, allows tenured and non-tenured faculty to apply for three to four hours of reassigned time in a given semester to pursue special scholarship projects. 
  • CSC provides permanent reassigned time to faculty who engage in important activities and services for the campus.  Reassigned time varies from 25 to 50 percent release from teaching assignments, depending on the nature of the activities.  (RR34)
  • All employees of Chadron State College may take college courses using faculty and staff tuition waivers. 

The Curricular Context

 

Programs of Study:

  • Chadron State College offers the following undergraduate degrees:  Bachelor of Applied Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Science in Education.
  • The college offers undergraduate programs in 26 different academic disciplines in thirteen academic departments, distributed in three academic schools.  Programs of study include subject majors of 30 to 36 credits, comprehensive majors of 48 to 57 credits, teaching endorsements that include subject and broad field, minors of 18 to 21 credits, and certificates of 12 to 21 credits.  Currently the college offers undergraduate programs in 71 majors or endorsements, 58 minors, and 21 certificates.  The programs of study are categorized into 12 groups by CIP codes for the purposes of the HLC institutional snapshot.  The table below shows the distribution of graduates for the past three years in these twelve categories.
  • Through its Extended Campus Programs Chadron State College has a long tradition of serving the needs of learners located across its vast service region with the first distance learning course being offered in 1930.  The college offers courses on the residential campus in Chadron, at select sites within western Nebraska via interactive television and on-site instruction, as well as online and correspondence courses throughout the nation.  From July 2005 to June of 2006, 228 classes were offered through extended campus programs.  Offices in Alliance, McCook, North Platte, Sidney, and Scottsbluff, which include ITV classrooms, are staffed by college employees to facilitate awareness of and response to regional needs, student enrollment and advising, and public outreach efforts. (RR35)

 

Undergraduate Degrees Awarded by Major per Year

Completions by CIP code

July 1, 2003-June 30, 2004

July 1, 2004-June 30, 2005

July 1, 2005-June 30, 2006

Agriculture/Natural Resources

(1, 3)

9

11

11

Architecture/Engineering/

Engineering Technology (4,14,15)

12

9

7

Biological & Physical Science

(26, 40, 41)

31

54

40

Business (52)

100

85

110

Communications/

Communication Technology/Fine Arts

(9, 10, 50)

19

9

23

Education/Library Science

(13, 20, 25)

167

163

148

Humanities/Interdisciplinary
(5, 16, 23, 24, 30, 38, 39, 54)

27

33

38

Health (51)

10

5

15

Mathematics/Computer

Science (11, 27)

6

11

14

Military Technology/Protective Services (29, 43)

45

32

35

Personal Services/ Consumer Services/Fitness (12, 19, 31)

39

24

30

Psychology/Social Sciences

& Services (42, 44, 45)

35

34

33

Totals

500

470

504

 

Source: Annual IPEDS Completions Survey

CSC Institutional Research

 

  • The college offers graduate degrees as follows:  Master of Arts in Education, Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of Education, Master of Science in Organizational Management, and Specialist in Education.   
  • There are three academic programs of study within the Master of Arts in Education including Community Counseling, History, Science, and Mathematics.
  • The MBA has a single program of study designed for supervisory and mid-level managers.
  • There are five programs of study in the Master of Education, including elementary and secondary curriculum and instruction, elementary and secondary administration, and school counseling.
  • The Master of Science Organizational Management degree is a Nebraska State College system-wide online degree.  There is a single program of study with four separate options in Human Services, Natural Resources, Sports Management, and Economic Development and Entrepreneurship.  Courses are offered online by the three state colleges, and students may take courses from any of the campuses for the degree.
  • The program of study in the Specialist in Education degree is designed to prepare candidates for the position of Superintendent of Schools.

 

Online Programs of Study:

  • In 2002, CSC applied to the Higher Learning Commission and was approved for a change in its Statement of Affiliation Status (SAS) to include online programs for the Baccalaureate in Mathematics and the Master of Business Administration. (RR36)
  • In January of 2006, the college participated in an HLC one-time “Special SAS Reconciliation for Distance Learning Degree Programs.”  This application resulted in the approval of five additional undergraduate programs and five additional graduate programs. (RR37) 
  • In the spring of 2006, the Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education approved an online degree, the Master of Science in Organizational Management, as a shared, cooperative degree among the three state colleges – Chadron, Peru and Wayne.  At the time of its April 2007 HLC site visit, CSC is seeking an expansion of its SAS to include this new degree. 
  • Currently CSC offers the following programs in completely distance learning formats including fully online as well as correspondence courses:

                        Bachelor of Arts – Majors

                        Business Administration

                                    Information Resource Management

                                    Psychology

                        Bachelor of Science– Majors

                                    Mathematics

                        Bachelor of Science in Education – Endorsements

                                    Library Media Specialist          

                                    Special Education

                        Master of Arts in Education

                                    Mathematics

                        Master of Business Administration

                        Master of Education

                                    Educational Administration (campus attendance in summer for 2 courses)

                                    Curriculum & Instruction – Education Technology                                                        

                                    Mathematics

Master of Science in Organizational Management – a NSCS shared online degree approved for fall 2006.  **CSC is seeking the addition of this degree to its SAS at the time of its April 2007 HLC site visit.

 

General Studies – Core Curriculum:

  • Chadron State College offers a General Studies core curriculum for all students.  This 47 hour program offers the students a variety of course choices in twelve required areas as follows:  Communication – three credits; Composition – six credits; Fine Arts – three credits; Global and Social Awareness – six credits of which three must be upper division; Government – three credits; Health and Wellness – three credits; History – six credits; Humanities – three credits; Mathematics – three credits; Physical Activity – two credits; Reason and Values – three credits upper division; and Science – three credits of life science and three credits of physical science.
  • During the past three years the Faculty Senate Academic Review committee has reviewed the General Studies requirements and each of the courses in the General Studies offerings.  During the past year the committee worked with faculty who teach courses in each of the twelve areas to develop student learning outcomes and measurable performance criteria for each of the twelve areas.  These learning outcomes and performance criteria are now printed in the new 2007-2009 college catalog, (RR38) and will be appearing in all course syllabi in each area of General Studies. (RR70)  Course embedded assessments will be used in each course, and faculty in each area will meet each semester to share results and discuss areas of improvement.
  • The General Studies section from the new 2007-2009 college catalog lists all courses along with the student learning outcomes and performance criteria. (RR39)

 

Developmental Courses:

  • Chadron State College, in partnership with Western Nebraska Community College (WNCC), provides developmental courses in writing and mathematics for students who have ACT verbal or math scores below 19.  At freshmen orientation or at the Student Academic Success Services office, new students may also take the eCOMPASS exam if they believe that their ACT scores do not reflect their true abilities.   
  • If a sufficient score – which is equivalent to an ACT verbal score of 19 - is achieved on the eCOMPASS exam, the student may enroll in Composition I.  The eCOMPASS (electronic Computer Adaptive Placement And Support System) scores are well correlated with ACT scores.  There are two developmental writing courses available based on scores as follows:  Basic Writing, ACT 15 and below; Developmental Writing, ACT scores between 16 and 18.  Both courses are offered on the CSC campus by WNCC.  The English faculty is also examining the issue of using ACT Reading scores to determine if other types of developmental courses are needed. 
  • The Mathematical Sciences Department uses a “value-added” approach to advising students with regard to both developmental math courses, and General Studies required mathematics courses.  If a student’s ACT Math test score is 1-18, the student must take the ASSET (eCOMPASS) test for proper advising.  The student will be advised to take a Mathematics course based upon the following matrix and value added placement:

                                    ACT Math Score         Recommended Math Course

                                    1-15                             ACFS-007M Basic Math

                                    16-18                           MATH 016 Intro or Intermediate Algebra

                                    16-18                           MATH 100 Pre-college Algebra

                                    >19                              MATH 142 College Algebra or value added

  • The Mathematical Sciences Department has designed a new two-semester program to increase the success of students in College Algebra, a math requirement for numerous CSC majors.  This proposal received approval from the Faculty Senate (RR40) Academic Review Committee in the fall 2006 to begin offering the two semester algebra sequence in the fall 2007.  In the fall semester, students with ACT Math scores below 19 will enroll in Math 100 Pre-college Algebra, and then in the spring semester they will enroll in Math 142 College Algebra.  Both courses will be taught by the same CSC instructor, an individual with significant high school teaching experience and an understanding of the needs of the developmental students.  Student learning outcomes for the two semester sequence will follow a natural progression for the entire sequence, and students will take both courses in the same academic year.  This option is being offered in addition to the existing remedial courses listed above.
  • Additional details regarding developmental courses at CSC are given in Chapter 3 of this self-study.

 

Program Assessment:

  • All academic programs of study at CSC have program assessment plans based on student learning outcomes. (RR138)  Course syllabi include specific learning outcomes that are subsets of the program learning outcomes. (RR70) 
  • A variety of direct and indirect methods of assessment are used by the academic departments.  “Assessment Day,” is the first day of final exam week when no exams are given during the day.  Faculty conduct assessments of graduating seniors, and meet with colleagues to discuss and analyze data.  Assessment reports are due on October 1 each year, for the previous academic year.
  • Chadron State College is one of fourteen institutions accepted into the “pioneer cadre” of the HLC Academy for the Assessment of Student Learning. (RR41) The college’s participation in this four-year program will allow it to accelerate assessment in academic units, and jump-start new efforts in non-academic services units.  Additionally the college’s plan for the academy will improve assessment efforts in the graduate programs, as well as General Studies.  Additional details about this effort are in Chapter 7 as well as documents related to the HLC Assessment Academy in the resource room.

Special Educational Opportunities:

  • In collaboration with the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) in Omaha, Nebraska, CSC offers the Rural Health Opportunities Program (RHOP).  The program was designed to address the shortage of healthcare professionals in rural Nebraska, by recruiting and educating rural students who will return to practice in the rural areas of the state.  RHOP currently has options for undergraduates in medicine, dentistry, dental hygiene, pharmacy, medical technology, physical therapy, nursing, physician assistant, and radiography. Admission into each option is competitive. Upon successful completion of the appropriated curriculum at CSC, participants accepted into RHOP receive automatic admission into the designated professional program at UNMC.  The college funds a full-time professional staff position in the Health Professions Office to coordinate the logistics of this and other health professions programs, as well as a faculty member with reassigned time as Director of Health Professions.   A similar program with Creighton University exists in Occupational Therapy and Pharmacy, and is known as the High Plains Health Opportunities Program (HPHOP).
  • Professors engage the college’s students in a variety of research activities.  A number of these opportunities are funded by the CSC Research Institute (RIC). (RR42)  The projects funded by RIC involve a variety of applied research that impacts the region.  Faculty and students who participate in these research projects are funded by EpSCOR and CSC to attend the annual Nebraska Academy of Sciences conference to present their results.
  • The Office of Internships & Career Placement provide significant assistance to students who wish to complete internships.  Many of the academic programs either encourage or require internships, and students may enroll in one to twelve credits for participation. 
  • Florida State University approached CSC in 2004 requesting that the college become a partner with them to help provide a distance education Master’s of Social Work program within our region.  Florida State received a FIPSE grant to develop programming for rural, under-served populations with master’s level social work education.  Chadron State College did join with Florida State.  Chadron State College provides supervision of field experiences, tutoring to students, and development of field placements for the master’s level students.  Students are receiving a degree from Florida State with the assistance of Chadron State College.  The advantage to CSC is that we will have more master’s level field supervisors to use within our bachelor’s level program and will be able to place our field students closer to the rural communities surrounding Chadron State College.  This is a limited contract with Florida State and will be evaluated at the end of the grant period by Florida State.

           

The Regional Outreach Context

Chadron State College is an active and valued institution across its service region.  Below is a sampling of the activities with which the college is involved as it seeks to reach out and serve the residents of western Nebraska and the region.

  • Chadron State College enjoys close partnerships with the two community colleges in its service region.  These are Western Nebraska Community College (WNCC) with campuses in Scottsbluff, Alliance, and Sidney, and Mid-Plains Community College (MPCC) with campuses in North Platte and McCook.  The CSC Extended Campus Programs unit has offices and staffing at all five of these campuses.  In addition, CSC maintains ITV classrooms at each site and offers a variety of courses via ITV, online, blended, and correspondence.  WNCC provides developmental courses in writing and mathematics on the CSC campus in a specially designated classroom for WNCC.  Detailed transfer agreements with both institutions are periodically reviewed and updated.  The faculty and administration of WNCC and CSC meet on a quarterly basis, alternating between the campuses, to discuss updates in curriculum and programs of study.  These meetings also help the two colleges to improve the seamless enrollment and transfer of students.  The CSC faculty and administration generally meet on an annual basis with the staff at MPCC.
  • CSC maintains and updates its transfer agreements with all of the community colleges in Wyoming, Colorado, and Nebraska on a yearly basis.  The Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Management and Institutional Research Officer is in charge of the articulation agreements, and she contacts these institutions regularly.  She also works with the Registrar’s Office to ensure that these transfer agreements for courses are readily available on the CSC website http://www.csc.edu/transfer/  and that they include the most recent updates.
  • Chadron State College and the U.S. Forest Service are partnering to provide research opportunities at the Hudson-Meng Bison Kill site in northwestern Nebraska. (RR43)  The Forest Service which supervises this site has created a scientific research advisory board and the CSC Vice President for Academic Affairs chairs this board.  In this role, the college solicits and the board reviews research proposals for each field season.
  • In order to promote rural economic development, CSC has, after a three-year hiatus due to budget cuts, reopened its Nebraska Business Development Center (NBDC) in the spring 2006.  The center which receives funding from the Federal Small Business Administration, as well as from the college, is located in the Burkhiser Complex in the Department of Business & Economics.  The NBDC director is a full-time faculty member at CSC who receives reassigned time for directing the center.  He is assisted by other faculty, graduate assistants in the MBA program, and an office assistant.  The services of the center are provided at no charge to small businesses throughout western Nebraska. 
  • The college sponsored a three-day Home Town Competitiveness Academy (HTC) (RR44) in 2006 and solicited teams from communities around the region to attend.  The HTC Academy provided training in the four pillars that are essential to rural economic development, and is currently providing technical assistance to those communities who are working to implement the HTC principles. 
  • The college also maintains a Center for Economic Education (CEE) that provides summer workshops and free teaching materials for K-12 economics. 
  • The college partners with the regional Education Service Unit (ESU) #13 in Scottsbluff to provide college credit for teacher workshops and short- or long-term professional development courses.  Summer short courses offered in blended format, with both an online and on-campus component, are offered by faculty to meet the needs of teachers who are striving to become “highly qualified” based on the No Child Left Behind standards.
  • CSC regularly hosts the Western Nebraska Administrators Association * on campus. (RR45) This group also serves as an advisory board to the Education faculty as they seek to provide appropriate programs for students and assist schools and students with teacher placements. 
  • In 2003 the college received a Title III planning grant, titled “Reducing Barriers to Recruitment, Retention, and Graduation of Native American and Hispanic Students at Chadron State College.” (RR46)  Please see Chapter Five for additional details.
  • The Chadron State College Galaxy Series provides students, faculty, staff and community members learning opportunities through the visual and performing arts. Please see Chapter Five for additional details.
  • In addition to the performing arts, Chadron State College houses three gallery spaces on campus. For 2006, the popular attraction was a western art exhibit and sale programmed to coincide with the Cowboy Poetry Gathering. Please see Chapter Five for additional details.
  • The Distinguished Speaker series at Chadron State College features speakers addressing topics of concern.  The theme for 2006-07 is immigration. Please see Chapter Five for additional details.
  • The Chadron State College and Community Powwow is a Native American gathering with drum groups and dancers.  It was suggested in the fall of 2001 by Native American students in the White Buffalo Club.  The first powwow was held in 2002.  It is now an annual event at Chadron State College.  Funding for this event comes from the Helen Peterson Bequest, the Dean of Arts and Sciences, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Multicultural Services on campus.  On average fifty to one hundred students benefit from this initiative every year, and between 250 and 350 individuals have participated in the festivities annually.  This appears to be one of the stronger outreach programs directed at Native Americans in Chadron, other communities in the vicinity, and the Pine Ridge Reservation.  This is one way that the college is attempting to increase Native American enrollment rates.  If Native youth attend the college powwow on an annual basis, then perhaps the college will be an attractive choice for them if they decide to pursue a degree after high school.
  • Chadron State College sponsors a series of special thematic days for high school students.  These events provide an opportunity for students to explore a variety of careers or co-curricular activities.  These include:  Health Professions Day (200 – 400 students), Theatre Day (250 – 300 high school students, and 900+ elementary students), Law Day, Native American Day of Welcome *, and Art Day.  The college also sponsors interactive events that require students to display research projects or participate in academic contests.  These include:  Scholastics Day (attended by over two thousand students each year), History Day, High Plains Band and Choir Festival, High Plains Jazz Festival, and Summer Athletic Camps.  Numerous tours and presentations are also provided each year to K-12 students by the Eleanour Barbour Cook Geology Museum, the High Plains Herbarium and Greenhouse, and the CSC Planetarium.