Chadron State College
Chadron State College

CSC Timeline

1910s | 1920s | 1930s | 1940s | 1950s | 1960s | 1970s | 1980s | 1990s | 2000s

1910s

1909

A bill introduced by State Rep. Charles H. Chase of Crawford calling for the establishment of a state normal school in what was then the Sixth Congressional District passed in the Nebraska Legislature in April.

1910

Joseph Sparks

Joseph Sparks

Members of the Nebraska Board of Education arrived by train from Crawford the night of Jan. 4 to inspect Chadron as a possible site for the new normal school. They left for Rushville about 7 p.m. the following day. Chadron was selected as the site during a meeting in Lincoln on Jan. 8 on the 15th ballot.

Administration Building June 15, 1910

The stake for the center section of the Administration Building was driven on June 15, 1910, after members of the State Board of Education chose the spot midway between Main Avenue and Bordeaux Street, about 500 feet from the north line, according to the Chadron Journal. H.M. Childs of York, president of the board, drove the iron stake as it was held by L.P. Ludden of Lincoln, the secretary.

Members of the Nebraska Board of Education returned to Chadron on June 15 to select the site of the new building and to drive the stake marking the location for what became the Administration Building. That same day, Joseph Sparks was selected as the school’s president.

1911

The freshman class of Nebraska State Normal and at Chadron

The freshman class of Nebraska State Normal and at Chadron had its picture taken in the hills south of campus in 1911, the year that school opened. Professor Charles Phillpot was the class sponsor. He is seated third from the right.

Cafeteria Garden

One way to make sure the cafeteria served good food is to grow your own and have studentss tend the garden. That’s exactly what was taking place at Nebraska State Normal soon after the school opened in 1911.

Chadron Normal had a football team the first year the school was open. In front, from left, are Lester (Doc) Gibson and Harold Haas. In second row are Heaman Carmean, Guy (Chic) Coffe, Kenneth Naylor, Walter (Todd) Bowman, Kenneth Scovel, Paul Akert and Clece Childers. In the back are Vivian Lundmark, Lavergne Irwin, Throm, Edwin Hennessy, Allan Fisher and Coach Charles White. Records indicate the team won two games and lost one.

Chadron Normal had a football team the first year the school was open. In front, from left, are Lester (Doc) Gibson and Harold Haas. In second row are Heaman Carmean, Guy (Chic) Coffe, Kenneth Naylor, Walter (Todd) Bowman, Kenneth Scovel, Paul Akert and Clece Childers. In the back are Vivian Lundmark, Lavergne Irwin, Throm, Edwin Hennessy, Allan Fisher and Coach Charles White. Records indicate the team won two games and lost one.

The first term of Nebraska State Normal School at Chadron began on June 5 with an enrollment of 111. Dedication ceremonies for the new building were held on July 28.

1915

Now known as Sparks Hall, this red brick structure opened in 1915 at Nebraska State Normal School in Chadron, and served as the women’s dormitory and cafeteria. It cost $27,257.

Now known as Sparks Hall, this red brick structure opened in 1915 at Nebraska State Normal School in Chadron, and served as the women’s dormitory and cafeteria. It cost $27,257.

A women’s dormitory, now known as Sparks Hall, was opened on Jan. 5. It cost $27,257. Also completed at mid-term was the first portion of the west wing of the Administration Building. It cost $27,569. The school was accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools as a teachers college.

1916

Robert Elliott

Robert Elliott

Joseph Sparks resigned as president of Chadron Normal in April. At the same meeting, Robert I. Elliott was selected as the new president.

This orchestra apparently was composed largely of students from the Campus Laboratory School in the mid-teens. Richard Yarndley, center, was the conductor. Some of the others can be identified. On the left in front is another Normal Music instructor, Roy Peterson. Behind him is Greydon Nichols, a long-time Chadron attorney. Margaret English is on the cello. Holding the violin in front is Frances Smith, granddaughter of Chadron’s founder, Fannie O’Linn. Next to her in the stripped dress is Ruth Wilson, daughter of noted history professor E.P. Wilson. Another Wilson girl, Eleanor, is directly behind her. Evelyn Good, daughter of State Sen. Jimmy Good, is at the drums.

This orchestra apparently was composed largely of students from the Campus Laboratory School in the mid-teens. Richard Yarndley, center, was the conductor. Some of the others can be identified. On the left in front is another Normal Music instructor, Roy Peterson. Behind him is Greydon Nichols, a long-time Chadron attorney. Margaret English is on the cello. Holding the violin in front is Frances Smith, granddaughter of Chadron’s founder, Fannie O’Linn. Next to her in the stripped dress is Ruth Wilson, daughter of noted history professor E.P. Wilson. Another Wilson girl, Eleanor, is directly behind her. Evelyn Good, daughter of State Sen. Jimmy Good, is at the drums.

Believe it or not, Chadron State Normal had a girls basketball team in 1917. The players, in front from left, are Orpha Carmean, Bess Remender and Marguerite Morrissey. In the back are Ruth Sweeney, Clair Gordon and Vivian Heiser. Bess Remender

Believe it or not, Chadron State Normal had a girls basketball team in 1917. The players, in front from left, are Orpha Carmean, Bess Remender and Marguerite Morrissey. In the back are Ruth Sweeney, Clair Gordon and Vivian Heiser. Bess Remender's grandson, Cactus Shumway, was a baseball player at CSC in the early 1970s and gave the Ivy Day oration in 1972.

By authority of the State Board of Education, the Bachelor’s degree was granted. During this same era, Harry E. Reich of Chadron was appointed to the Board.

The second addition to the west end of the Administration Building was constructed and contracts for $52,195 were signed for the east wing in June.

1920s

1921

This is undoubtedly the first aerial photo taken of what evolved into Chadron State College. It was taken after 1921, when the new gymnasium opened. The small dots behind the gym are apparently people ice skating where Elliott Field is now located.

This is undoubtedly the first aerial photo taken of what evolved into Chadron State College. It was taken after 1921, when the new gymnasium opened. The small dots behind the gym are apparently people ice skating where Elliott Field is now located.

1924

The C was placed on C Hill by T. A. F. Williams, a college mathematics professor and later the registrar.

1925

The college switched from semesters to quarters, the letter grading system was adopted and a C average was required for graduation.

The college’s football team was undefeated, posting a 9-0 record and defeating the University of Colorado 3-0.

1926

Through the years, hundreds of teachers and school administrators have received a major portion of their training in this building at Chadron State. It is the Glenn Hildreth Education Building, constructed in 1926. It initially served as the Campus Laboratory School.

Through the years, hundreds of teachers and school administrators have received a major portion of their training in this building at Chadron State. It is the Glenn Hildreth Education Building, constructed in 1926. It initially served as the Campus Laboratory School.

The “training school,” now known as the Hildreth Education Building, was constructed at a cost of $94,800.

1927

The Legislature gave additional authority to the teachers colleges to grant the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees.

1929

The stadium at Elliott Field had recently been completed when this photo was taken just prior to kickoff. The drive for the stadium began in 1929. Notice the position of the player holding the ball for the kicker.

The stadium at Elliott Field had recently been completed when this photo was taken just prior to kickoff. The drive for the stadium began in 1929. Notice the position of the player holding the ball for the kicker.

The library was constructed and the Chadron Memorial Stadium Association was formed to raise funds for a football stadium, which opened that fall.

The college was accredited by the American Association of Teachers Colleges, the first year the organization issued accreditations.

1930s

1931

The campus was expanded with the purchase of 96 acres from Dr. M. B. McDonnell and Harry B. Coffee for $7,500.

Edwin Crites of Chadron replaced Harry Reich on the State Normal Board.

1932

Edna Work Hall was opened Sept. 1, 1932, five months after the contract was awarded. It contained 104 beds and a dining hall to accommodate 200. It cost about $100,000. Six years later, Crites Hall, which is very much like Edna Work Hall, was constructed.

Edna Work Hall was opened Sept. 1, 1932, five months after the contract was awarded. It contained 104 beds and a dining hall to accommodate 200. It cost about $100,000. Six years later, Crites Hall, which is very much like Edna Work Hall, was constructed.

Edna Work Hall opened. It cost approximately $100,000.

The American Association of Teachers Colleges gave Nebraska State at Chadron its highest rank, Class A. Just 100 colleges and universities received the rank.

1933

The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools accredited the college as a liberal arts school as well as a teachers college.

1937

This photo of the Administration Building was taken in 1937, the year the college observed its silver anniversary, although the school was actually 25 years old in 1936. During the 1970s, Dutch elm disease necessitated removal of many of the trees that had been planted early in the college

This photo of the Administration Building was taken in 1937, the year the college observed its silver anniversary, although the school was actually 25 years old in 1936. During the 1970s, Dutch elm disease necessitated removal of many of the trees that had been planted early in the college's history.

The college observed its 25th anniversary that included a pageant with a cast of 500.

1938

Ivy Day was initiated to honor top scholars.

Crites Hall opened in the fall at a cost of about $150,000.

1939

A civilian pilot training program was begun.

The school readopted the use of semesters instead of quarters.

1940s

1940

Robert Elliott resigned as president for health reasons in March, and was replaced by professor Edwin Rouse, who served as acting president for 14 months.

1941

Wiley Brooks

Wiley Brooks

Dr. Wiley G. Brooks became president in May.

1942

Painting the C on C Hill is a ritual many freshman at Chadron State College have experienced through the years. Not all of the excursions were as mild at this one, which apparently was in 1944, appears to be.

Painting the C on C Hill is a ritual many freshman at Chadron State College have experienced through the years. Not all of the excursions were as mild at this one, which apparently was in 1944, appears to be.

After compiling records of 16-4 and 15-3 the previous two years, the basketball team had a 17-4 record and was the Nebraska entry in the national tournament in Kansas City.

The Navy entered the college’s pilot-training program, which officially became a part of the war effort in July.

1949

After having records of 7-1-1 and 7-1 and tying for the conference championship the previous two years, the Chadron State football team, which finished with a 7-3 record, was invited to play in the Bean Bowl in Scottsbluff.

A bill introduced by State Sen. William Hen of Chadron allowed the state colleges to offer liberal arts degrees. Another legislative measure officially designated the college as Nebraska State Teachers College at Chadron.

1950s

1952

The basketball team advanced to the national tournament, finishing the season with an 18-7 record.

1953

Long-time Normal Board member Edwin D. Crites died on Nov. 7. His funeral was the first event held in Memorial Hall. Another Chadron attorney, Ernest M. Johnson, was appoointed to take his place on the Board.

Dr. Wiley Brooks resigned as president, effective July 1, 1954.

The “block system” for senior education majors was announced.

1954

Barton Kline

Barton Kline

Dr. Barton L. Kline was appointed president.

Memorial Hall has been a busy place on the Chadron State campus since it opened in 1954. Lots of student and community activities take place in it each year. A $990,000 renovation project in the early 1980s made the building more useful than ever.

Memorial Hall has been a busy place on the Chadron State campus since it opened in 1954. Lots of student and community activities take place in it each year. A $990,000 renovation project in the early 1980s made the building more useful than ever.

Memorial Hall, which cost about $700,000, was officially opened in February.

Ernest Johnson was reappointed to the Normal Board, but some Chadron residents fought the decision, and he was not confirmed by the Legislature. Bruce Hagemeister of Hemingford was named to the position.

1955

Property was purchased along the west side of the college as the location for married student housing units. The building of six units costing $32,000 was authorized.

The Normal Board allowed the state colleges to begin programs leading to Master of Science in Education and Master of Arts in Education degrees.

1956

Don Meter won the national intercollegiate calf roping title.

1957

Judging by the water in the ponds on the right, it had been a wet spring when this picture was taken in the late 1950s. Brooks Hall, which opened in 1957, had been completed, but the Campus Center, which was begun in 1960, was still on the drawing board.

Judging by the water in the ponds on the right, it had been a wet spring when this picture was taken in the late 1950s. Brooks Hall, which opened in 1957, had been completed, but the Campus Center, which was begun in 1960, was still on the drawing board.

Wiley G. Brooks Residence Hall was opened in the fall, costing about $304,000.

1958

The 1958-59 cheerleaders were a chipper crew. In front, from left, are Marlene Rasmussen, Earl Horn and Beverly Johnson. In the back are Lynda Atwood, Russett Tangeman and Joyce Baker.

The 1958-59 cheerleaders were a chipper crew. In front, from left, are Marlene Rasmussen, Earl Horn and Beverly Johnson. In the back are Lynda Atwood, Russett Tangeman and Joyce Baker.

These athletes gave Chadron State its finest hour in the sprints. Among their accomplishments was winning both the 880 and mile relays at the Nebreska College Conference Meet in 1958. Their mile time of 3:22.8 was a conference record. They are, from left, Virgil Meyer, Frank Ferguson, Keith Kyser and Dick Boness. Ferguson won the conference’s 100-yard dash in 1957 while Meyer captured both the 100 and 220 in both 1958 and ’59. All four are now members of the CSC Athletic Hall of Fame.

These athletes gave Chadron State its finest hour in the sprints. Among their accomplishments was winning both the 880 and mile relays at the Nebraska College Conference Meet in 1958. Their mile time of 3:22.8 was a conference record. They are, from left, Virgil Meyer, Frank Ferguson, Keith Kyser and Dick Boness. Ferguson won the conference’s 100-yard dash in 1957 while Meyer captured both the 100 and 220 in both 1958 and ’59. All four are now members of the CSC Athletic Hall of Fame.

The football team finished with a 8-0 record and was rated No. 18 in the final NAIA poll.

New standards were set for students entering teacher education, with an IQ of at least 105 recommended.

1959

A $1.1 million construction package was announced. It included $500,000 for the north half of the Campus Center, $357,000 for the wing to Edna Work Hall, $148,000 for 24 apartments for married student housing and $125,000 for a new boiler house and boiler.

Seniors in teacher education began student teaching off campus for the first time.

1960s

1960

The Chadron State College marching band, led by drum majorette Doris Covie, posed for the photographer on the hill just east of Elliott Field. The photo is circa 1960.

The Chadron State College marching band, led by drum majorette Doris Covie, posed for the photographer on the hill just east of Elliott Field. The photo is circa 1960.

Bruce Hagemeister resigned as a member of the State Normal Board, and Chadron businessman Henry Freed was appointed.

1961

The Campus Center at Chadron State was completed in two phases. The south half was constructed in 1961 and the north half in 1966. Soon after it was opened, the south half began experiencing structural problems. It was closed in 1979.

The Campus Center at Chadron State was completed in two phases. The south half was constructed in 1961 and the north half in 1966. Soon after it was opened, the south half began experiencing structural problems. It was closed in 1979.

Clark Elkins

Clark Elkins

Dr. Barton Kline resigned as president and Dr. Glenn Hildreth resigned as dean. They were replaced by Dr. F. Clark Elkins and Dr. Edwin C. Nelson, respectively.

It was announced early in the year that the high school portion of the Campus Laboratory School, known as Chadron Prep, would close in May. Late in ’61, it was announced that the junior high portion of the school would close in May 1962.

1962

The National Guard Armory opened on the campus.

1963

The name of the college officially became Chadron State College.

1964

The Ross Armstrong Health and Physical Education Building was opened in 1964. Besides serving as a gymnasium, it is kept busy with activity courses and has been used often for tournaments, commencements and other special programs.

The Ross Armstrong Health and Physical Education Building was opened in 1964. Besides serving as a gymnasium, it is kept busy with activity courses and has been used often for tournaments, commencements and other special programs.

The elementary portion of the Campus Laboratory School closed in May.

The Ross Armstrong Physical Education Building, costing $600,000, opened.

1965

Albert Kent Residence Hall, costing $1,225,000, opened.

Four new graduate programs in the preparation of school principals and guidance counselors were approved by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.

1966

The Lyle Andrews Residence Hall, costing $1.4 million, and the north half of the Campus Center, costing $757,000, opened. Also, a $450,000 addition was made to the Sheaman Heating Plant.

1967

Edwin Nelson

Edwin Nelson

Dr. F. Clark Elkins resigned as president and Dr. Edwin C. Nelson was promoted from dean to president. Dr. Larry A. Tangeman became dean of the college.

The CSC basketball team had a 22-6 record and represented Nebraska at the NAIA Tournament in Kansas City.

One of the more striking buildings ever erected at Chadron State is the Reta King Library. It was completed in 1967 following a lengthy wait to secure federal funding so it could be expanded from what the state had provided.

One of the more striking buildings ever erected at Chadron State is the Reta King Library. It was completed in 1967 following a lengthy wait to secure federal funding so it could be expanded from what the state had provided.

As the enrollment at Chadron State increased during the late 1960s and early ’70s, the college needed new dormitory space. The buildings, from left, are Kent Hall, High Rise and Andrews Hall. Kent Hall cost $1,225,000 and opened in 1965. Andrews Hall cost $1.4 million and opened in ’66 and High Rise cost $1.87 million and was completed in 1967.

As the enrollment at Chadron State increased during the late 1960s and early ’70s, the college needed new dormitory space. The buildings, from left, are Kent Hall, High Rise and Andrews Hall. Kent Hall cost $1,225,000 and opened in 1965. Andrews Hall cost $1.4 million and opened in ’66 and High Rise cost $1.87 million and was completed in 1967.

The Reta King Library, costing $945,000, opened along with the High Rise Dormitory, costing $1,870,614.

The Post Playhouse at Fort Robinson was opened under the control of Chadron State College.

1968

CSC was one of ten schools in the nation to receive a certificate of special recognition from the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education for its professional studies program.

1969

The south half of the Campus Center, the building in the right foreground, was under construction and the library, the white building on the left, was in the center of controversy when Dr. F. Clark Elkins arrived as CSC’s president on July 1, 1961. The library wasn’t completed until after Elkins left five and one-half years later. This picture was taken from atop the High Rise dormitory.

The south half of the Campus Center, the building in the right foreground, was under construction and the library, the white building on the left, was in the center of controversy when Dr. F. Clark Elkins arrived as CSC’s president on July 1, 1961. The library wasn’t completed until after Elkins left five and one-half years later. This picture was taken from atop the High Rise dormitory.

CSC was one of five schools to receive a plaque for distinguished achievement from the AACTE for assuming the administration of the Crawford Schools.

1970s

1970

The Math and Science Building (top) and the Burkhiser Technology Complex were added to the Chadron State scene in the early 1970s to help give the college some excellent instructional facilities. Both are located on the eastern edge of the campus.

The Math and Science Building (top) and the Burkhiser Technology Complex were added to the Chadron State scene in the early 1970s to help give the college some excellent instructional facilities. Both are located on the eastern edge of the campus.

The Adult and Continuing Education Department was begun.

The Science and Mathematics Building, costing $1.25 million, opened.

The State Normal Board finally changed its name to Board of Trustees of Nebraska State Colleges.

1971

The Industrial Education-Home Economics Building, later renamed the Donald Burkhiser Technology Center, opened. It cost $1.4 million.

CSC was one of ten schools to receive a certificate of special recognition from the AACTE for its participation in the Panhandle Educational Resources Center.

The college was reorganized into five schools.

Excavation of the Hudson-Meng Bison Kill Site was begun northwest of Crawford. The project drew national attention.

1972

The volleyball team won the Nebraska Women’s Intercollegiate Sports Council Tournament.

Bob Lynch finished the wrestling season with a perfect 31-0 record and won the 158-pound championship at the NAIA Tournament. His career record was 87-6.

Henry Freed asked not to be re-appointed to the Board of Trustees, and was succeeded by Dr. William Colwell of Chadron.

1973

Sweets for the sweet. The 1973 Homecoming queen candidates stopped for a candy bar while getting their picture taken. They are, from left, Cheri Landrey, who was crowned the queen, Deb Moore, Deb Heiting, Kim Wasserburger and Kathy Stricker. Note the length of the skirts in those days.

The 1973 Homecoming queen candidates stop for a candy bar while getting their picture taken. They are, from left, Cheri Landrey, who was crowned the queen, Deb Moore, Deb Heiting, Kim Wasserburger and Kathy Stricker.

The scenery was extra good at Chadron State College for several years during the early 1970s, when Harry Simonton organized the “Eaglettes,” who performed at halftime of athletic events and for other special occasions.

During the early 1970s Harry Simonton organized the “Eaglettes,” who performed at halftime of athletic events and for other special occasions.

Larry Tangeman

Larry Tangeman

Dr. Edwin Nelson was asked to temporarily become executive secretary of the Board of Trustees and Dr. Larry Tangeman became the Chadron State president. The arrangement was to last 20 months, or until July 1, 1975.

The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools gave its approval for CSC to begin offering the Specialist in Education Degree. The foreign language program was discontinued.

1974

The agricultural program, which had been discontinued in the 1950s, was reinstated.

The Hot Springs Mammoth Site was discovered, and gave the college’s Earth Science Department more national attention.

1975

Backed by the Pine Ridge, Chadron State College has not only been a strong educational institution during its 100 years of existence, but it also has a scenic setting. This is a 1975 circa photo of the “completed campus” until the Nelson Physical Activity Center was started in 1985.

Backed by the Pine Ridge, Chadron State College has not only been a strong educational institution during its 100 years of existence, but it also has a scenic setting. This is a 1975 circa photo of the “completed campus” until the Nelson Physical Activity Center was started in 1985.

In 1974, CSC graduate Harold Thompson of Los Angeles and his wife, LaVerne, presented the college with funds to purchase a 50-acre tract of land to the soutwest of the campus to form a natural history preserve.

In 1974, CSC graduate Harold Thompson of Los Angeles and his wife, LaVerne, presented the college with funds to purchase a 50-acre tract of land to the soutwest of the campus to form a natural history preserve.

A cooperative program that found Chadron State offering numerous courses at Nebraska Western College in Scottsbluff was begun. The School of External Programs was begun.

Fifty acres of land adjoining the southwest corner of the campus were purchased through a $40,000 contribution by Harold and LaVerne Thompson of California.

1977

Dr. William and Ruth Colwell gave 281 acres to the Chadron State Foundation for the Pepper Creek Outdoor Learning Center.

Dr. Larry Tangeman resigned as vice president of academic affairs to become president of Peru State College.

The CSC football team was ranked No. 10 in the final NAIA Division II poll with an 8-2 record. The following year the Eagles were 7-2-2 and won the Boot Hill Bowl at Dodge City, Kan. The team’s quarterback, Brad Fults, was named Nebraska State College Athlete-of-the-Year his senior year in 1979.

1978

These coeds were the candidates for Homecoming Queen in 1978. In front, from left, are Karen Watson, Kathy Davenport and Barb Franklin. Behind them are Sharon Kelly and Jean Curd. Watson won the honor while Franklin was the Ivy Day Queen and Kelly the Blue Key Sweetheart in 1979.

These coeds were the candidates for Homecoming Queen in 1978. In front, from left, are Karen Watson, Kathy Davenport and Barb Franklin. Behind them are Sharon Kelly and Jean Curd. Watson won the honor while Franklin was the Ivy Day Queen and Kelly the Blue Key Sweetheart in 1979.

Keith Kemper of Alliance was appointed to replace Dr. William Colwell on the Board of Trustees, effective Jan. 1, 1979.

1979

The women’s rodeo team finished fourth in the nation, and won first place at 11 of 13 rodeos during the 1978-79 season. The team was composed of Jean Fuchs, who was the national breakaway roping champion in 1978; Kathy Kennedy, the national breakaway champion in 19679; and Martee Meter, who was fifth in the nation in barrel racing in ’79.

Chadron State was appropriated $95,000 for an all-weather track, but the bids exceeded the amount, and the money was returned to the state.

Chadron State was awarded a $75,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education for a “Planning for the ’80s” grant.

The south side of the Campus Center was closed in December because of settlement problems.

1980s

1980

Chadron State cowgirls won the Central Rocky Mountain Region’s team championship.

The Master of Arts degree was offered.

Dr. Don Deselms was appointed the college’s vice president, effective July 1.

1981

Beauty was certainly prevalent among the 1981-82 CSC cheerleaders. From left are Kathy Hadsell, Lorie Sayer, Diane Surrett, Penny Moller, Melanie Johnson and Ranea Langer.

The 1981-82 CSC cheerleaders, from left, Kathy Hadsell, Lorie Sayer, Diane Surrett, Penny Moller, Melanie Johnson and Ranea Langer.

During spring break from college classes in 1981, these Chadron State students took a very active role in promoting the Activity Center by riding bicycles 460 miles to Lincoln to discuss the matter with state senators. The students, from left, are Laura Larsen, Wauneta; James Stewart, Omaha; Gene Stratton; Rhonda Hernandez, Scottsbluff; Casey Frye, Laramie, Wyo.; and Angie Koehler, Neligh. The balls Mohr and Frye are holding were signed by CSC students and given to senators as petitions supporting the project.

During spring break from college classes in 1981, these Chadron State students took a very active role in promoting the Activity Center by riding bicycles 460 miles to Lincoln to discuss the matter with state senators. The students, from left, are Laura Larsen, Wauneta; James Stewart, Omaha; Gene Stratton; Rhonda Hernandez, Scottsbluff; Casey Frye, Laramie, Wyo.; and Angie Koehler, Neligh. The balls Mohr and Frye are holding were signed by CSC students and given to senators as petitions supporting the project.

Chadron State was cited by the American Association of Teacher Educators for having a “distinguished program in teacher education.”

Todd McIntyre placed second in the nation in saddle bronc riding.

Chadron State received a $244,000 Title III grant from the U.S. Department of Education to improve its academic services.

1982

Spring Daze

Spring Daze 1982

Students in the Division of Business won the first of three straight championships in the graduate division of the International Business Policy Games at Reno, Nev. CSC also won first in its section of the undergraduate division in 1984.

1983

Reta King

The Chadron State library was named in honor of Reta E. King in August 1983. She had served as a college librarian for 24 years before retiring in 1980.

Chadron State received another Title III grant, with first-year funding of $298,712 and anticipated total funding of $1.2 million by the time the grant expires in 1987.

The Chadron State volleyball team won the District 11 championship.

The Chadron State cowgirls finished fifth in the final national team standings. Shari Fisher placed second in the nation in barrel racing and Bunny Pisacka was fifth in goat tying.

1984

Chadron State was cited by the U.S. Department of Education for its leadership in rural education.

The Legislature appropriated $990,000 from cigarette taxes for the renovation of Memorial Hall.

The Chadron State wrestling team won its first of two straight Area Tournament championships.

Val Fitch, once a student at Chadron State, received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. He had received the Nobel Prize in physics in 1980.

Gov. Bob Kerrey

When Gov. Bob Kerry visited Chadron State in January 1984 to discuss his proposed budget, he was greeted by signs such as this. The governor did not include funding for the Activity Center in his budget, and then vetoed the funding from the appropriations bill. However 31 senators voted to override the veto, and CSC, at long last, obtained the building.

The Legislature voted to override Gov. Bob Kerrey’s veto and appropriate $4.7 million for the construction of a Physical Education Activity Center at Chadron State.

Jean Lovell of Gering was appointed to replace Keith Kemper of Alliance as a member of the Board of Trustees for western Nebraska, effective Jan. 1, 1985.

1986

This is the way the 72,500-square foot Physical Education Activity Center at Chadron State looked in teh spring of 1986 as it was nearing completion. The structure is located just west of Elliott Field.

This is the way the 72,500-square foot Physical Education Activity Center at Chadron State looked in the spring of 1986 as it was nearing completion. The structure is located just west of Elliott Field.

In February, Dr. Edwin C. Nelson resigned as president of Chadron State Sept. 1.

1987

Sam Rankin

Sam Rankin

Dr. Sam Rankin was inaugurated in April as the eighth president of the college.

Chadron State College’s teacher education program was reaccredited by all levels of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education for seven years and by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools for ten years.

Dr. Gary Musgrave became the new dean of students, replacing Jacque Schmiedt.

Kline Center Demolition

Kline Center Demolition

The south half of Kline Campus Center was demolished because of structural problems.

1988

Ground breaking for the 22,000-square foot Student Center was in October.

Students from neighboring states were now allowed to pay resident tuition through a new pilot program.

The planetarium in the Math & Science Building was refurbished.

1990s

1990

Campus

The CSC Campus in 1990

The new Student Center opened.

The first students were accepted into the Rural Health Opportunities Program, which the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Chadron State initiated.

1991

Football crowd

Spectators crowd the stands at Elliott Field during a 1991 football game.

The Master of Business Administration degree program was started.

A new general studies program was also installed.

Chadron State was the first college in Nebraska to adopt a policy in which students with a completed associate of arts degree from an accredited college would not have to take more general studies courses.

1992

Phase II construction of the Student Center was completed. This phase included construction of a 43-foot clock tower, a gift from Bill and Frances Lindeken.

An agreement between the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Chadron State College allowed students to obtain a degree with a composite major in range management by studying one or two years at UNL.

Four CSC students participated in the 10-week Nebraska Semester Abroad program in Europe.

The college ended its 50-year affiliation with the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) and became a full member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, Division II.

Josh Robinson was the first CSC basketball player to achieve NAIA All-American honors.

1993

Lindeken Clock Tower

Dr. Sam Rankin and William Lindeken stand at the Lindeken Clock Tower, located in the heart of the CSC campus.

CSC was one of the first colleges to incorporate ethics into the general education program.

Interactive television

Dr. Sam Rankin, Dr. Roger Wess and Senator James Exon discuss the behind-the-scenes portion of CSC's interactive television installation.

Twenty courses were sent to 47 off-campus classrooms with the help of new multi-point switching equipment.

1994

The North Central Association approved CSC’s assessment plan.

Brooks Hall was reopened.

The remaining north half of Kline Campus Center was remodeled and accommodated the media center, print shop, development, alumni and information offices, the school newspaper, a computer laboratory and other space for classrooms and faculty offices.

1995

Network connections were installed in High Rise, which allowed students to have direct access to the Internet.

CSC developed a Web site, making information about the college available to anyone with an Internet connection.

Corey Campbell, tailback on the football team, was selected as first-team Academic All-American and was Burger King Scholar-Athlete of the Week.

1996

One hundred new computers were installed on campus.

Minors in Spanish and Native American studies were added.

Vlad Gots of Ukraine became the first student from the former Soviet Union to be enrolled at Chadron State College.

The football team won the its first Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference title.

1997

President Sam Rankin announced he would step down from office to teach history at CSC.

Dr. Tom Krepel became the new senior vice president of academic affairs.

Construction of a new press box at Elliott Field began as well as a concession stand and restroom structure.

CSC offered its first courses over the Internet.

1998

Dr. Tom Krepel, senior vice president of academic affairs, became interim president July 1, when Dr. Sam Rankin left office.

Renovation began on the college’s first gymnasium, Miller Hall, to turn it into classrooms and a computer center.

Dr. Joyce Hardy became vice president of acting affairs. Dr. Monty Fickel took Hardy’s former place as dean of the School of Math and Science on an interim basis.

1999

Tom Krepel

Tom Krepel

Dr. Thomas Krepel became the college’s ninth president after the trustees made his interim position permanent.

Renovations to the Burkhiser Complex were made by converting several large shops into classrooms for drafting, graphic design and electronics programs.

One thousand seats were added to the Elliot Field football stadium.

Will Ferrell won bull riding at the National Intercollegiate Rodeo.

Elmo Eagle II

Elmo Eagle II was "hatched" Saturday night during halftime of the Chadron State men's basketball game with Nebraska-Kearney with well over 2,000 spectators looking on. Eagle uniforms, particularly those that are cardinal or Bordeaux red, and white with a fan in the head to cool the human on the inside, aren't cheep these days. About $2,500 was scraped together from a half dozen budgets to make the purchase from an Edmonton, Alberta, firm. Everyone agreed, Elmo II is a handsome dude.

2000s

2000

A new Chadron State College logo was unveiled. The logo was designed by Charlie Mitchell.

Chadron State received the “Connecting Nebraska Award” from the Nebraska Development Network.

Football Coach Brad Smith won his hundredth game at CSC.

2001

CSC was the first college in Nebraska to offer a Bachelor of Applied Sciences Degree.

A new major was added in Applied History.

The CSC Golden Eagles dance team won the national Hip Hop Dancing championship at the Spotlight National Dance Cup Finals.

Dustin Elliot

Dustin Elliot, 2001 NHRA Bull Riding Champion

Dustin Elliot won the bull riding championship at the College Nationals Final Rodeo in Casper.

2002

Memorial Hall reopened after renovations.

The Maintenance Service Building was completed.

The Mari Sandoz High Plains Heritage Center was established in the former library.

Due to budget cuts tuition was increased 9.3 percent, and fees grew by 6 percent.

The Rural Health Opportunities Program was selected as one of the state’s top 10 rural development initiatives.

2003

CSC was among 12 “founding institutions” chosen to develop the model of excellence for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities’ “Foundations of Excellence in the First College Year” project.

The Students in Free Enterprise team won its fourth consecutive year at the regional competition in Denver. For the second year in a row it placed in the top 10 at the national finals in Kansas City.

The CSC track team set 10 school records.

2004

Dr. Tom Krepel announced his resignation as president.

Dr. Margaret Crouse was named interim dean of the School of Professional and Graduate Studies.

Dr. Robert Stack became interim dean of students.

Brad Smith gave up the head coaching position to become more dedicated to being the college’s athletic director. Bill O’Boyle, one of Smith’s assistants for 14 years, was appointed interim head football coach.

The strategic plan called Vision 2011 was launched. The plan, which was designed to take the college to its centennial year, had 84 proposed activities that were approved for implementation.

A mile-long recreational trail through the scenic Thompson Natural History Preserve’s construction was completed.

Danny Woodhead led the NCAA II in rushing, scoring, and all-purpose yards.

2005

Janie Park

Janie Park

Dr. Janie Park was appointed to be the new president. She had previously been the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Montana State-Billings.

Dr. Joyce Hardy returned to teaching science at CSC. Dr. Lois Veath assumed the position of senior vice president of academic affairs. Taking Dr. Veath’s previous position as the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences was Dr. Kathy Bahr.

The Eagles were the only Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference team to receive the volleyball honor.

2006

Spotted Tail Wildfire

A column of smoke from the Spotted Tail Wildfire moves over the campus as the fire approaches C-Hill.

The Spotted Tail Wildfire threatened the campus in late July. The fire, which resulted from lightning strikes south of Chadron, burned to the edge of the football practice fields.

Dr. Janie Park was inaugurated as the 10th president.

Twelve degrees could be obtained online.

Track and field athletes broke 19 school records.

The football team had a regular season schedule of 11-0.

2007

Danny Woodhead and Joe McLain

Quarterback Joe McLain hands off to running back Danny Woodhead during a home game at Elliott Field.

Danny Woodhead was awarded his second Harlon Hill Trophy. Woodhead gained nationwide coverage, and was featured in Sports Illustrated and the New York Times.

CSC went on lockdown during a citywide search for five armed robbery suspects.

Sparks Hall reopened after renovations and housed the central administration and its support staff, human resources and the Alumni and Foundation office.

Renovation work began on the Administration Building.

2008

The football team won its third consecutive RMAC championship, marking the first time in the RMAC’s 100-year history that a team has gone undefeated in conference play three straight years.

Upward Bound, a federally funded program, helped 40 students from Chadron, Alliance and Gordon-Rushville to succeed and have a more successful path toward college.

Josh Majerus and Brett Hunter

Wrestlers Josh Majerus and Brett Hunter

Josh Majerus won the NCAA Division II 197-pound championship.

2009

The Chadron State Foundation kicked off the public portion of its first-ever multi-million dollar fundraising campaign.

Volunteers helped plant 52,200 seedlings on the hills south of campus to replenish trees that were lost during the Spotted Tail Wildfire in 2006. The seedlings were purchased with a grant from the Arbor Day Foundation.